1911Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok, I know of Tap, rack, bang and SPORTS, but what procedure does one use for the 1911?
Step by step possibly?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
538 Posts
Tap, rack, ready--if that fails RUN. Second gun is nice, would not leave home without it. GLV
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,030 Posts
I know I am getting old, but what the hell is tap, rack, bang, and SPORTS? Are we talking NASCAR, NFL??

T,R,B is not a good thing have to agree with the previous poster, T,R,, REEVALUATE/REACESS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Tap=tap the bottom of the mag to make sure that it's seated in the magwell

Rack=rack the slide to eject possibly faulty/stuck round or casing

Bang=bang

SPORTS applies to the M-16/M4 series

Slap the magazine up to make sure it's seated

Pull the charging handle

Observe the chamber for round/casing ejecting

Release charging handle

Tap forward assist

Shoot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
In addition to others, some have added Roll. The pistol is rolled to the right during the rack in an effort have gravity assist in removing anything from the ejection.

On a lighter side, I read this the other day:

Smack, Jack & Whack!

Smack the base of the magazine;
Jack the slide to the rea;
Whack the Goblin or the target.

Hey, it was funny.



[This message has been edited by shotgunner (edited 07-13-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
that smack jack and rack sounds more on the personal level. easier way to remember though
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
605 Posts
Don't know how this fits in with real life but when shooting in an IDPA type match I have decided on a reload.

First of all, FTF could mean a faulty round, a light strike, no round, poorly seated mag or faulty mag. If it is the latter, a TRB is only going to result in another FTF. Trying to cover all the possibilities with the failure drill costs me time and brain power that needs to be focused on the original scenario (before the FTF).

Therefore, if I pull the trigger and get no shot fired, I reload, rack and go (RRG?). This drill works for a revolver just as well...gun go click...reload.

With this method, the failure drill is an action you are already familiar with - one less thing to remember in a gunfight. Also, you don't have to try to remember how many shots were fired before the FTF. You may actually be empty! Slides don't always lock back.

What do you guys think?

Mikey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,518 Posts
Originally posted by Mikey:
Don't know how this fits in with real life but when shooting in an IDPA type match I have decided on a reload.

First of all, FTF could mean a faulty round, a light strike, no round, poorly seated mag or faulty mag. If it is the latter, a TRB is only going to result in another FTF. Trying to cover all the possibilities with the failure drill costs me time and brain power that needs to be focused on the original scenario (before the FTF).

Therefore, if I pull the trigger and get no shot fired, I reload, rack and go (RRG?). This drill works for a revolver just as well...gun go click...reload.

With this method, the failure drill is an action you are already familiar with - one less thing to remember in a gunfight. Also, you don't have to try to remember how many shots were fired before the FTF. You may actually be empty! Slides don't always lock back.

What do you guys think?

Mikey
Not at all to be condescending - after all everyone has to work out their own emergency plan - but reloading simply takes too long.

I have yet to see the person who can reload *from concealment*, rack the slide and be back on target in less than 2 seconds (from the first failure to fire)... If you were already in serious trouble (else why are you shooting) then you don't have 2 seconds.

TRA (used to be TRB) takes less than 1 second. But I also like to stress that every reload and every remedial action should begin with a move... either to cover or, if there is no handy cover, to make yourself harder to hit.

TRA and clearing a vertical "stove Pipe" (which is sort of rare)are the only two remedial actions that I will attempt for real... the rest are corrected by pulling the backup gun.

Food for thought,
Jim Higginbotham
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
605 Posts
Mr. Higginbotham,

I will re-evaluate my decision. Your recommendation, based on your experience alone, is enough for me to do a re-think.

My personal thinking has been that it takes me a second just to switch gears and perform a different movement than I would normally do if the gun was empty. I figured it was less confusing to my muscle memory. I also figured, perhaps improperly, that a FTF had a better than fair chance of being the result of a faulty magazine, resulting in another failure if the TRB was executed instead of a reload.

I have been somewhat spoiled by the dependability of the guns I use for carry and competition. I have gone many thousands of rounds without having to actually clear a malfunction. The "DUH" response is almost guaranteed should I have a malfunction tomorrow, hence my original response - gun no shoot...put in more bullets.

Mikey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,304 Posts
I like the New York reload.

But instant, no hesitation stoppage drills are why it makes sense to have a few "faulty magazines" for range practice. Once in a while have someone else put them into, or hand you the mags to put into the gun/mag pouches blind. Any stoppages will be at least a bit of a surprize, especially if they are the "feed ok sometimes" and you'll get real practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
What Jim said.

Too...many people use the orange safety trainers to induce FTF's. Have your range buddy load a couple of those in while your not looking, very good practice.

There is some debate whether it is better on a 1911 to rack from the rear or forward grasping grooves. I am still sticking w/ the rear, but other prefer the front.

Some people shoot left handed from the left barracade, and then Tap, rack , bang w/ the right hand. I found that this was just too goofy for me. So, if I now shoot left handed w/ right supporting (I am right handed), I will clear stoppages by switching the pistol back to my right hand, and then back again. Sounds too complex, but it works for me better than fumbling around the other way.

The real kicker is , of course , one handed drills. Unless you are a real serious operator, I would never do these except w/ an UNLOADED gun.
Behind cover, I would try for the heel of my boot to rack on.
In the open, run for cover, or at least move around, and use your gun belt or pant pocket to hook the rear sight (cocking the hammer first helps) You tap off your leg by the way. Just raise your knee high will you are running (I get more bruises that way
People who are good at this can clear a stoppage one handed while running, with amazing fluidity.

Lots of ideas out there. Have to see which ones work for you.
Elsworth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Originally posted by Just a GI:
Tap=tap the bottom of the mag to make sure that it's seated in the magwell

Rack=rack the slide to eject possibly faulty/stuck round or casing

Bang=bang

SPORTS applies to the M-16/M4 series

Slap the magazine up to make sure it's seated

Pull the charging handle

Observe the chamber for round/casing ejecting

Release charging handle

Tap forward assist

Shoot
"Seek cover" is the first S in SPORTS. Sports is used when immediate threat falls back or when one has time to duck behind cover. Tap, Rack, Bang for immediate engagement.
Anyway, looks like my own little drills follow what has been said in the posts. Thanks guys.



[This message has been edited by Gargoyle (edited 07-17-2001).]
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top