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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm looking for a lock for a Colt Police Positive that a woman I know currently keeps in the top drawer of a very tall highboy dresser.

I've convinced her that while I respect and appreciate her willingness to defend herself and her daughter, an eight year old girl is bound to find this gun sooner or later, and I don't want to see a tragedy result from it. Informing the girl and directing her to leave it alone is not a viable option.

I showed the woman a 9v-powered, clamp-on, two piece lock which requires punching in a four digit code to unlock, at which point you pull the two halves apart and have full access to a pistol or revolver. She tried it, and said that it was too complex and time-consuming for her to perform under the conditions that would send her to the dresser for the revolver (house alarm going off in the middle of the night, etc.).

Since I haven't kept up with these devices, I'd very much appreciate any recommendations for locking devices that are fast and easy, while still securing the gun when not needed by the owner.

Thanks very much, gang.
 

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There are small safes available that use a key code or fingerprint to open it. The one I saw plugged into the wall and had a battery backup. That's what I'm going to get when my kids are born. Cabela's sells this item.

If I may ask, why is teaching the girl about the proper use and safety of firearms out of the question?

-Patrick
 

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because we have grand kids visiting the home our guns are often kept in a finger safe (holds each of our preferred home defense guns) that requires a key or a finger punched access code to open. punch pad is battery powered. the code takes a couple a seconds to enter and key requires a few seconds longer.

very easy and reliable access, once you have practiced and it is 2nd nature to you. guns are always loaded and ready this way but safely away from the kids.

when kids are not around they may stay in out of sight "safe" areas known only to my wife and i, but still would not have those accessible to the kids who have a way of finding those areas by accident it seems. some kind of kid radar thing.

i have also seen a swing out picture frame that holds a 1911 size hand gun for easy access.

be safe, shoot well. :rock:
 

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connolpm said:
There are small safes available that use a key code or fingerprint to open it. The one I saw plugged into the wall and had a battery backup. That's what I'm going to get when my kids are born. Cabela's sells this item.

If I may ask, why is teaching the girl about the proper use and safety of firearms out of the question?

-Patrick
excellent question. when I was a kid there always guns everywhere. I had the four saftey rules pounded into my head from day 1. for all i know they told them to me in the womb. I was allowed to look and handle guns anytime I wanted so long as I asked permisson, checked the weapon first thing, everytime I picked it up, and follow the other saftey rules. I never touched trigger until I was ready to dry fire. When I was very young, toddler-early elemntary I wasn't even allowed to point my toy guns at other kids. So naturally when playing cowboy and indians I missed alot.
I was probably safer then then I am now, As I often find myself checking chambers out of habit and not really paying attnetion to what ios in them. Or I catch myself sweep myself with a muzzle when dry practicing or cleaning. Boy that kind of thing didn't happen growing up.
not saying this is or can be the case for all kids. But I think if you can, familiarizing a kid with guns is the absloute safest way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
connolpm said:
If I may ask, why is teaching the girl about the proper use and safety of firearms out of the question?-Patrick
Patrick (and Higgy): Fair question. My experience as a child was very much like yours, and both of my two sons knew how to check and unload pistols, revolvers, rifles (bolt and lever action) and shotguns (O/U, side by side, and pump) at an early age (they're now 22 and 26).

Without getting into the specifics, gentlemen, this particular child, who is sweet and lovely, has some challenges that most kids don't. I could not live with a tragedy that came to pass because I didn't face that head on, and do what I could to protect her, while still enabling her mother's right and desire to defend herself and her daughter when I'm not there.

So to you and mitrod3, my thanks. I'll do some looking into the rapid access safes for her.

I have a safe from R&D Enterprises (www.handgunsafe.com) bolted into the console of my Tahoe, and it's perfect for me with its mechanical Simplex lock, but this woman wants something that is secure, but even easier under stress, so that's what I'll try to dig up.

Thanks again, gang.

Six
 

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take your daughter out with a .22 wheel gun,bring some
miik jugs with water or jello, tell her this what happens to
people , and have her single shoot a jug, show her damage
then shoot one with a .357, she'll get the idea, and teach
her often,
 

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Bulldog, . . . it's a bit of "out of the box" thinking, . . . but how about a speed loader (or 2)?

She could put the speed loader(s) another place, . . . and the gun stays in the drawer. Even with just a little bit of practice, she could load that puppy in the dark, . . . and would never have to worry about someone being hurt with the gun (provided she effectively hid all the ammo, including the speed loaders).

Just a thought, . . . my $.02

May God bless,
Dwight
 

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Bulldog,
you are right a safe is the only way to go. There is one out now that is fingerprint operated. Also when waking up from a dead sleep, for someone who does not really know weapons, the extra seconds may save her from a accidental shooting.

For those who say teaching is all you need ,,,, B.S.

I carry a firearm for a living, but when Iam not home the guns are locked and secured. I teach my kids and trust them, but mistakes in judgement happen and they do have friends, why take a chance.

Just a opinion
 
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