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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently rebuilt an ATI government 1911. I chose a cheap gun as I am learning (mechanically inclined, always worked with my hands, not just someone taking a stab in the dark) I purchased the Kuhnhausen book which I studied and used as a reference. Ever part of the ATI is now Wilson parts, beside the grip safety which I cut into a rat tail bc of the retro commander hammer I installed. I have fired just 2 mags through the gun and it ran great, was mostly checking to see if ejector, extractor and all functioned well. My question it, what are the steps to make absolutely certain that thee safety systems are to be trusted? I carry my colt cocked and locked as a reference so im more just looking to know I can be sure to do that with this gun. This is my usual carry gun bc I don't care if it gets banged up so id like to know it can trustedtrusted. All internals have been replaced and fitted by me.
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First off check the grip safety is easy, cock it, lower your hand so the safety isnt depressed, try pulling the trigger, nothing happens, you are good.

Second, thumb safety, cocked and locked, try pulling the trigger, if nothing happens you are good.

If those 2 things work, next Id say shoot it, I typically set a standard of 500 rounds before I carry a 1911, then again I set this standard years ago when ammo was cheaper than gold....so you may want to adjust your round count.

and I didnt say it but of course make sure the weapon is unloaded.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
First off check the grip safety is easy, cock it, lower your hand so the safety isnt depressed, try pulling the trigger, nothing happens, you are good.

Second, thumb safety, cocked and locked, try pulling the trigger, if nothing happens you are good.

If those 2 things work, next Id say shoot it, I typically set a standard of 500 rounds before I carry a 1911, then again I set this standard years ago when ammo was cheaper than gold....so you may want to adjust your round count.

and I didnt say it but of course make sure the weapon is unloaded.
Thanks, much appreciated. And that was my concern, though I have a decent supply of ammo, last thing I really wanna do is tap into it in these times hahaha
 

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Thanks, much appreciated. And that was my concern, though I have a decent supply of ammo, last thing I really wanna do is tap into it in these times hahaha
Yeah right now unfortunately is a horrible time to have to burn ammo.

The 2 tests I mentioned should square you away on the safety aspect of it though.

Real honest, Ive not been a fan of ATI 1911.....but I do like what you did with yours......The idea of buying one as a "build" gun is intriguing me now....so thanks for that! haha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah right now unfortunately is a horrible time to have to burn ammo.

The 2 tests I mentioned should square you away on the safety aspect of it though.

Real honest, Ive not been a fan of ATI 1911.....but I do like what you did with yours......The idea of buying one as a "build" gun is intriguing me now....so thanks for that! haha.
I totally agree, not a fan of them at all but picked up a new one for about $320, so I figured it'd be a good starting point since the slide is forged. I knew that putting expensive parts in it wouldn't help the resale, but it was more about learning and having a carry piece I could trust
 

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I totally agree, not a fan of them at all but picked up a new one for about $320, so I figured it'd be a good starting point since the slide is forged. I knew that putting expensive parts in it wouldn't help the resale, but it was more about learning and having a carry piece I could trust
Well hopefully the world goes back to "normal" soon and we can buy ammo without getting a second mortgage and selling a kidney, then both of us can start shooting our 1911's again haha!

Im very interested to hear about it all goes after some time carried and shot!
 

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A little more rigorous test of the thumb safety is the M. Ayoob YARF test.
Yank And Retain Function.
Cock the hammer, engage the thumb safety.
Pull against the trigger hard.
Hold the gun to your ear and ease the hammer back slightly.
There should not be a "click" as the sear returns to full depth. The thumb safety locks the sear into the hammer hooks and it should keep them ALL THE WAY into the hooks, with no movement if the trigger is pulled.
 

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Thumb safety test: As Jim Watson said, do the YARF test.

Disconnector test:

Cock hammer, then slowly pull the slide back part way, (about 1/4".)
Hold trigger down while holding slide partially back.
Continue to hold trigger while releasing slide, then release trigger.
You SHOULD hear the disconnector click back into place.

If the hammer falls when lowering the slide back down while holding the trigger, the disconnector is not working, and is unsafe.

Very important! If the disconnector is not resetting, the gun can go full-auto!
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hold the gun to your ear and ease the hammer back slightly.
There should not be a "click" as the sear returns to full depth. The thumb safety locks the sear into the hammer hooks

when you say ease the hammer back, are you saying let the hammer down? and what sort of click would I be listening for?
 

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When listening for the click, you are thumbing the hammer back, taking it off the sear. The click comes from the sear resetting, having been allowed to move slightly because the thumb safety was not fitted to prevent any movement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
When listening for the click, you are thumbing the hammer back, taking it off the sear. The click comes from the sear resetting, having been allowed to move slightly because the thumb safety was not fitted to prevent any movement.
so any rearward thumsafety movement is bad? it moves rearward about 1/12 of an inch
 

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I'm not certain I follow you. You are checking to see if there is any sear movement, causing the click. This indicates the thumb safety is not fit correctly

The thumb safety nis not touched, other than being engaged during the test.

I'm not certain either by what you are calling thumb safety movement. It should rotate on the pin, but there should be no linear movement that seems implied in your message.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I'm not certain I follow you. You are checking to see if there is any sear movement, causing the click. This indicates the thumb safety is not fit correctly

The thumb safety nis not touched, other than being engaged during the test.

I'm not certain either by what you are calling thumb safety movement. It should rotate on the pin, but there should be no linear movement that seems implied in your message.
my bad, I meant rearward hammer movement, when checking for the click the hammer moves back about 1?16th of an inch
 

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That shouldn't matter in this case. What we are looking for (listening for) is the click of the sear once the hammer tension is eased up. It will happen as soon as the tension is eased.

If the thumb safety is properly fitted, there will ne no click as the thumb safety is correctly preventing any movement of the sear when applied.
 
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