1911Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
395 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I might get the :dope: call on this but I am going to ask anyway.

Has anyone tried using a really aggressive media to create a front strap treatment? I guess I am wondering if a griptape or stippling style texture could be achieved using a blaster...

Any thoughts would be welcome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,062 Posts
It would have to be some VERY coarse, VERY aggressive media and run at really high pressure.
The trick would be to get the rougher texture without blasting away too much metal.

A better, more controlled job is obtained by either matting or stippling.
Matting is simply a lighter, somewhat smoother version of stippling done with a matting punch.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,401 Posts
I occasionally bead blast my stainless guns, but can't imagine the force it would take to get an aggressive frontstrap. Want something great? Check out Chuck Roger's golfball treatment, I've got it on my two main carry 1911's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,332 Posts
If you used #1 or #2 sandblasting sand with about 150 psi - it would give an aggressive texture. Just be sure to cover any parts that you do not want blasted with 2-3 layers of duct tape (yes, I said duct tape). It provided a solid enough cushion that the surface below it does not get marked.
Duct tape is what I use to protect gasket surfaces on intake manifolds when I blasted them to clean them up.
The secret would to be to use short blasts - letting the compressor build up again each time. 1 -2 passes with high pressure would give an aggressive pattern. Several with lower pressure would give a passive pattern. The more passes, the less aggressive the pattern.

A little sandblasting secret that I learned - to maintain the highest pressure for the longest time, use an air gun to release pressure until the compressor starts, stop the air gun as soon as the compressor starts, let the pressure build up again - while watching the gauge. Start sandblasting just before the compressor shuts off. It will take a few tries to find the sweet spot. This way the compressor is running at max psi and still pumping when you blast. Otherwise it drops to 100 psi before it starts. Make sense? If not re-read this and try to figure out what I meant. It does make a big difference in available blasting time. I am just having a hard time explaining myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,319 Posts
open mind

I had read about skateboard tape, and seen/touched a few guns sporting 'grip' tape, but thougt for myself only 20LPI would do, but

I kept an open mind, and

I bought $5 worth of medium-grit skateboard tape, and

applied some to my 9x19 Springfield Armory stainless steel 1911, and

now I like it more than I ever considered possible, so

I put some on my 40 S&W Springfield Armory stainless steel 1911, and

I really like it.

Other frontstrap treaments I own include smooth, stippling, serrations, and 20LPI.
Glad I kept an open mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
I "french grey" my front straps with fine aluminum oxide at 90 psi. It's not as aggressive as checkering or stippling, but it gives a decent grip. Combining it with 20 lpi serrations is my favorite no-snag treatment for my CCW guns. Holding the gun 90 degrees to the surface gives me a little more bite.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
395 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the all the info guys. I have done some sandblasting of cast parts (heads and blocks,etc) and some rusty body parts. The intention was only to remove rust or paint though, definitely not to create a texture. Hence the question.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top