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Thinking about sending back the Armor Tuff slide on my CQB Elite and having it blued . Hoping that removing the Armor Tuff is not a big deal . Has anyone done this ?
 

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From what I understand no can do.
 

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I would think it has to be bead blasted to remove the armortuff. Which would leave a very undesirable finish underneath to Blue I would imagine..
 

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I could be wrong, and have been before. I believe WCR said that they have done some blue after AT. Not advertised very much though.
 

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forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?t=484197

Probably not exactly what you wanted to read, OP. But, there it is. ^^^^
 

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It is parkerized UNDER the Armor Tuff. It can be done but it is a time intensive and costly job with 'acceptable, read "not stellar" results
 

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Discussion Starter #10
forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?t=484197

Probably not exactly what you wanted to read, OP. But, there it is. ^^^^
Very helpful . I believe the price quoted is the same as on their website so they are apparently not charging more for removing AT . I would just be doing slide . Not sure about the new guns vs old guns and depth of rollmarks issue. My test target is March 2014 . Is mine a new gun or an old gun ?
 

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I wonder if it could be done with a chemical stripping process. Only reason I say this is because I have a gun in ion bond that I sent back where they did not do a very good job. I was originally told that ion bond needed to be blasted off. Then I found out they can perform a chemical stripping process. Can't hurt to ask.
 

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It is parkerized UNDER the Armor Tuff. It can be done but it is a time intensive and costly job with 'acceptable, read "not stellar" results
This is the key answer. Parkerizing is not reversible. It chemically alters the surface of the steel in a way that's good for anti-corrosive properties, and also a good base for Armor Tuff.

But a parkerized surface is, bluntly stated, a lousy surface for applying the chemical process of blueing ... the steel has already been chemically altered in way that's not going to take especially well to bluing.

Edit/Added: I do agree with AlchemyCustom's post below that bluing is still technically possible ... with a lot of work and skill. But doing this to a previously parkerized and Armor Tuff finished 1911, is similar to starting a baseball game or a football game with a significant deficit on the scoreboard before the game even starts. You are playing catch-up ... while it may still be possible for a great team to win, it's not a good way to choose to start a game.
 

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I have been under the impression that going from SS to Armor Tuff is not possible due to the finish not adhering well to SS.
Armor Tuff adheres pretty well to stainless steel, although not quite so well as to a parkerized carbon steel surface. Wilson's flanged barrel 1911s as well as compensator 1911s (Carry Comp, Hunter) typically have Armor Tuff applied to the stainless steel barrel flange/compensator area.

Some day, I just might get a Armor Tuff stainless steel 1911 for absolute maximum corrosion protection.
 

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It's true that coatings don't adhere nearly as well to stainless as they do carbon. It's primarily due to the way that the material reacts to abrasives, cutting, and sandblasting. We blast stainless parts for coating with garnet. This insures that we get a good surface for the coating to bite into. For carbon steel we prep with white aluminum oxide. It's more pure than the standard brown aluminum oxide. Parkerizing is a good primer, but it doesn't necessarily make the coating "stick" any better than spraying on a blasted only surface.
 

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It's true that coatings don't adhere nearly as well to stainless as they do carbon. It's primarily due to the way that the material reacts to abrasives, cutting, and sandblasting. We blast stainless parts for coating with garnet. This insures that we get a good surface for the coating to bite into. For carbon steel we prep with white aluminum oxide. It's more pure than the standard brown aluminum oxide. Parkerizing is a good primer, but it doesn't necessarily make the coating "stick" any better than spraying on a blasted only surface.
+1 Excellent input.

It's always a pleasure to learn more than one (myself in this case) previously knew from a master of a trade. Thank you Alchemy!!:)

One the last part, I'm guessing that the parkerizing process' effects of "roughening up" the surface is what causes the Armor Tuff to adhere a little better ... thus your observation that Armor Tuff (or a similar coating) will adhere equally well (or perhaps even better?) to a surface that's been blasted as per your methods. I knew the end results of what Armor Tuff best (and not so best) adheres to ... but not the mechanism as to "why".
 

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Armor Tuff adheres pretty well to stainless steel, although not quite so well as to a parkerized carbon steel surface. Wilson's flanged barrel 1911s as well as compensator 1911s (Carry Comp, Hunter) typically have Armor Tuff applied to the stainless steel barrel flange/compensator area.

Some day, I just might get a Armor Tuff stainless steel 1911 for absolute maximum corrosion protection.
Thanks for the clarification. Its appreciated.
 

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Thanks for the clarification. Its appreciated.
Thank you ... and also see Alchemy's excellent commentaries which add further to the explanation of when/why Armor Tuff best adheres to a surface. He's a master at the craft, far more knowledgeable than myself.
 

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But doing this to a previously parkerized and Armor Tuff finished 1911, is similar to starting a baseball game or a football game with a significant deficit on the scoreboard before the game even starts. You are playing catch-up ... while it may still be possible for a great team to win, it's not a good way to choose to start a game.
This analogy can be applied to many aspects of life. Funniest thing I've read in a while, chrysanthemum. :)

Thanks for adding to the thread, Alchemy. I'm sure it helps the OP and others, myself included, to make the best decision.
 

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It's always great to have the parkerized base as the "last line of defense" prior to bare metal showing through.

Someone mentioned parkerizing pitting the base metal. It definitely does that. As long as a potential finisher is dealing with quality parts with good markings, prepping for bluing or a matte bead blast, or brushed chrome finish poses no problems. It's just time on the plate or at the buffing wheel.
 
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