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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello, all,

I have a one-of-a-kind Colt Gov. Model 1911 that was manufactured in 1916, accurized by Jim Clark in 1959, and completely gold inlaid and engraved in 1962 by E.C. "Jack" Prudhomme of Shreveport, La. While this gun is 98 percent or better, it is inevitable that even atmosphere will take a toll on a blued gun. Should I ever decide to have such a piece reblued, I would appreciate suggestions on where to send it. Or perhaps I should ask the following question first: Should an engraved and gold-inlaid gun EVER be reblued? I assume the gun was reblued once after the work was done. Thanks. You're welcome to copy answers to [email protected]
 

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If you are looking at value, I do not think you should do anything to it. That piece has a lot of histoy to it, and re bluing it would wipe some of that away. You would no longer be able to say that it was inlaid by Mr Purdhomme since the inlay would have to be removed. Oh yeah.... PICTURES PLEASE:rock:
 

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Re-bluing an engraved, inlaid gun is an absolute LAST resort.

The metal has to be polished and this will wash out at least some of the engravers finer work.

If you MUST have it refinished, I'd send it to a top-end restoration service.

About the best is Doug Turnbull, who specializes in restoring antique American firearms to factory-new condition.

Among the guns he restores are engraved double shotguns, which usually have very fine engraving.

If anyone could do it without doing irreparable damage, it'd be Turnbull.

However, due to the value of your gun, any refinishing would do serious damage to the value, so, I'd recommend not refinishing the gun at all, unless you have no choice.
 

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Most guns that have been on a gun store's shelves for very long are in no better than 98% condition. Unless your gun was damaged in some way, refinishing would cost a ton, and add nothing to the gun's value.
 

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Absolutely do not try to refinish that gun. I doubt if any restoration gunsmith or refinishing shop would touch it with a ten-foot pole. Polishing will ruin the engraving and remove the gold inlay. That could possibly be replaced/redone at an astronomical cost, but of course it would no longer be original. So, you would pay $2000 to have it look new, while losing all the value in the gun. Just keep the gun clean and oiled, and touch it only with soft cotton, no synthetic fabric.
 
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