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Do a search and you will find many more opinions about bore snakes.

Piece of crap? Why would you think that? They might be a passing fancy, but they are not crap.

Bore snakes are really great for quick clean jobs where you don't have time to do a thorough gun cleaning. I often use one on my 1911 before I leave the range. The barrel is not clean, but it is free of a large amount of residue that was in it. I usually carry one in my range bag.

Some people use them as a final cleaning product. After you clean your gun, the bore snake gets to be the last item through the barrel (with a little oil on it) that boths helps remove anything you missed and oils the barrel.

For my 870, rarely do I use anything but a bore snake to clean it. Without rifling to hold any fouling, the bore snake is all I need.
 

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I have one for every gun I own. They do a great job on FMJ ammo don't know about lead though. I like them. They are also great for 22 rimfires (they save you from disassembling the barrel from the stock for cleaning. Also excellent on shotguns. When these wear out, I would buy another in a second. My .02 worth.

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I use several for my pistols when I need to do a quick wipe through the bore. Later, I do a thorough cleaning with patches.

A bore snake is all I use for my shotguns.
 

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Beats the hell out of me raspy...Sliced bread predates me...Asked my Dad and said "toilet paper"....
 

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I have one in every handgun caliber, and they work very well with FMJ and lead bullets. I only put some gun scrubber on it for fear of a strong solvent atttacking the bronze bristles. Sometimes (not very often) some more cleaning is required, and I complement it by passing a clean or oily patch afterwards. Sometimes I also use them for field cleaning in rifle calibers.
 

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For less than 20 bucks, it's one of the best things to come along. I use it right after I'm finished shooting for the day, while the barrel is still warm and even if I don't get aroung to thoroughly cleaning my guns that night, I know that I at least did something. I wouldn't be without one in my cleaning kit.
 

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I just bought one for my 870. I don't have one yet for the .45 It seems like a good cleaning tool though. Works well for the smooth-bore shotgun.

Are you supposed to use solvent with it? It says nothing about it in the instructions.
 

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Tim C,
You can use most solvents but I would hesitate on using copper solvents to protect the copper bristles. The other nice feature of the BoreSnake is that it can be washed and reused many times. I haven't had to replace one yet. Been using them for a little over a year now.

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I dip a bend of boresnake in Hoppes #9. I saturate the bend right behind the copper bristles.

I've heard of some people even putting gun oil on the rear loop to lube the bore in one step, but I prefer to run the snake through a few times and then spray some Remington oil on.

I also have one for every caliber I own. Buy one, you won't be dissappointed.

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-Electric Armadillo-
 

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I use bore snakes as a finishing tool. After I'm finished cleaning the barrel, I spray some Rem oil on it and run it through a couple times. It takes out any fouling I might have missed and oils the barrel at the same time. Great item.
 

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Well, I do use a bore snake (thanks to the recommendations I found earlier on this site) for a final clean-out of my barrel, but I don't oil it.

In fact, that's my question. In the firearms courses that I took, we were told never to oil the barrel--or at least, to remove the oil before shooting (perhaps that's what I'm missing here). The warning was that oil in the barrel would act as a barrier to the movement of the bullet down the barrel and create excessive pressures. The oil could not possibly "get out of the way" of the moving bullet fast enough. True?
 

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Works fine for me. I only have one for my .22 and for my shotgun. I clean my pistols with the brushes, and jags.

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Isn't this the land of the free?
 

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Hi,
I use one between stages when shooting a match when I use lead bullets. It keeps lead and lube residue blown back into the chamber from collecting and causing a possible failure to completely go into battery.
 

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Originally posted by EdGCNM:
In fact, that's my question. In the firearms courses that I took, we were told never to oil the barrel--or at least, to remove the oil before shooting (perhaps that's what I'm missing here). The warning was that oil in the barrel would act as a barrier to the movement of the bullet down the barrel and create excessive pressures. The oil could not possibly "get out of the way" of the moving bullet fast enough. True?
I believe that some firearms manufacturers (HK comes to mind) produce some pistols that they advertise as being capable of being fired underwater. Seems to me that a barrel full of water would have a lot harder time "getting out of the way". Did your instructor offer any solid evidence that a light coating of oil would dangerously raise pressures?
 
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