1911Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,204 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A while back I bought a couple of cans of Bostik NEVER-SEEZ Clean Brake (tm0 Heavy Duty Brake Cleaner. It contains Hexane, Ethane, Methanol and CO2, listed on teh can in that order.

It works well on removing crud from firearms but evaporites much more quickley than the dedicated gun cleaners or most of the other brake cleaners I've used. I did not get any on plastics so I can't report on the effects (if any) of the cleaner on them. I sprayed it on a painted steel rod and the paint was not removed, some cleaners will remove paint. I also tried it on a piece of steel that had heavy grease and dirt build up, it took several uses of the cleaner to remove the build up. The rapid evaporation rate may have had something to do with that, not enough time for it to set and work.

The cost was not as high as that of a dedicated gun cleaner but more than the other brake cleaners on the market. I had ordered it from http://www.mscdirect.com and with the shipping costs added the total price was even closer to that of the dedicated gun cleaners. If it was available in auto supply shops, it would be a good item to add to the gun cleaning supplies.

As an aside, it is the only brake cleaner that I have seen that comes with Material Safety Data Sheets.

------------------
Ne Conjuge Nobiscum
Molon Labe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,845 Posts
I'm crude and just use the cheapest brake cleaner I can find, although I mainly only use it on my ARs.

I still go through it fairly fast since I also clean my moulds with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Ran a search here for "hexane" and came up with this single, old, post.

I purchased some brake cleaner containing hexane, isopropanol and carbon dioxide. Hexane isn't listed as a halogen (like chlorine) but I was wondering if anyone has had any experience or heard of any reports re: the use of hexane on firearm metals.

The can says the product is non-chlorinated, so I think I'm good to go but I wanted to check what "the word on the street" was first. I'm looking to use this product on both Stainless and ferrous metals. Plastics too if possible.

Anyone???

BTW - all the msds sheets I have read on hexane state it is not a carcinogen. That's a plus but I'll beleive it when I die at 100 years old from natural causes :rolleyes: .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
Hexane is a hydrocarbon, like gasoline, and will not do anything to metal.

I imagine hydrocarbons will go after polystyrene, polyethylene, polypropylene, etc., pretty well. I really don't know what the plastics are that are used in firearms, so I can't predict what will harm them. But I think we very rarely hear of any problems with cleaning and plastic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
967 Posts
How does the brake cleaner work on rifling? Does it ease the removal of lead and copper fouling?

Aside from the barrel, the only place I have a problem cleaning on my 1991 is the inside of the dust cover. Everything else responds well to a toothbrush and elbow grease.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
2cats said:
I imagine hydrocarbons will go after polystyrene, polyethylene, polypropylene, etc., pretty well. I really don't know what the plastics are that are used in firearms, so I can't predict what will harm them. But I think we very rarely hear of any problems with cleaning and plastic.
The only "plastic" gun I have is a Glock and I can just do a test on a crappy old mag. I think they are the same material as the gun. The only other plastic parts I can think of on a gun would be the grips and possibly some sights but with the exception of the sights all the parts would probably be removed to do a full de-greasing/cleaning anyways. Someone with one of the new Berettas with all the plastic parts like trigger and such might want to beware though.

How does the brake cleaner work on rifling? Does it ease the removal of lead and copper fouling?
I have a feeling that the brake cleaner might not do the job on lead and copper very well but I have never tried it so I can't really say. I think the main reason for the brake cleaner is the removal of all the old oil/grease and to wash away dirt, debris, powder residue, carbon and that sort of thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
I use brake cleaner / carb cleaner to clean my firearms al te time. I ssuallyget either the cheapest stuff the store has (97 cents) or the Gmot brand for a bit more cash ($1.30, I believe).

Both of them WILL attack certain plastics. Specifically, I noticed the bristles on the toothbrush I was using to scrub parts down was sticking together, and a pair of nitrile gloves disintegrated while I was wearing them! Had to wash my hands REALLY fast then! Nowadays I wear at least two pair when spraying parts, and I change them as soon as the colour of the gloves starts changing.

You really shouldn't use this stuff for general gun cleaning, though. I only use it on new acquisitions (new or used - you never know) to completely clean and degrease them, so I can use my preferred lube. Besides, every gun I've ever bought used was FILTHY - looks like people around here just don't ever clean their guns!

The only other time I use brake/carb cleaner on guns is to do degreasing chores - after a trigger job or "fluff n' buff", or a feed ramp polish, just prior to a bluing touch-up. I'd use it also to help clean out a really dirty gun after a range trip, but I never let my guns get that bad!

Hey, my philosophy is: a gun can really never be TOO clean. If you gotta scrape out carbon fouling with a pick or something, you're not cleaning 'em often enough. Of course, I've not fired 1000+ rounds at a sitting, either (except when in the military - and they didn't get to that point then, either).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Brake Cleaner

I've been using the stuff for years on my stainless guns and on a Ruger 22/45, which has a plastic frame. No problems whatever but I make sure to lube and wipe down afterwards, as it removes all oil film. I'd keep it away from wooden grips that I care about.
Jeff
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,561 Posts
Something strange: I was using GunScrubber on my 1911, and some of it got on my left hand, and on and under my titanium wedding ring. I get the stuff on my hand all the time, and it never hurts. The second it hit that ring, it started zinging my hand something fierce. I went to the sink to douse immediately, because it hurt pretty good. When I took the ring off, there was a reddish-colored "burn" ring around my finger that continued to hurt for about a day. Also strange, the ring did not appear to be harmed in any way at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Neisse said:
You really shouldn't use this stuff for general gun cleaning, though. I only use it on new acquisitions (new or used - you never know) to completely clean and degrease them, so I can use my preferred lube. Besides, every gun I've ever bought used was FILTHY - looks like people around here just don't ever clean their guns!
Agreed. I give my toys the standard issue field strip cleaning after every (or every other) use but after a while the build up of gunk over time warrents a good 100% cleaning/de-greasing. I think this will come in handy for an annual or semi-annual cleanings.

Thanks for all your input everyone!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Actually, any hydrocarbon cleaner will dissolve the oil in your skin and be absorbed by your body. Not usually a good thing...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
If you read the MSDS sheets on these cleaners, most that contain the mentioned ingredients target your liver. This holds true for brake cleaner or gun scrubber, as the ingredients are nearly identical.
This is absorbed through the skin.
Keep your hands off this stuff!!!
There are better ways to ruin your liver. :) :cool:
Eric
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,075 Posts
ctrmass said:
If you read the MSDS sheets on these cleaners, most that contain the mentioned ingredients target your liver. This holds true for brake cleaner or gun scrubber, as the ingredients are nearly identical.
This is absorbed through the skin.
Keep your hands off this stuff!!!
There are better ways to ruin your liver. :) :cool:
Eric
Yea, I call this stuff "Cancer in a Can" and though I have it I try not to use it. Same for the Walmart Ed's Red I made. I've had a liver transplant and the older I get I'd rather use something safer, like FP-10. When I use brake cleaner I make sure I don't get it on my hands - I've gotten it under the wedding ring too and it hurts!

Also, surgical type gloves are no good with these - it eats 'em up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
953 Posts
Jim V said:
A while back I bought a couple of cans of Bostik NEVER-SEEZ Clean Brake (tm0 Heavy Duty Brake Cleaner.

As an aside, it is the only brake cleaner that I have seen that comes with Material Safety Data Sheets.

-----------------
Ne Conjuge Nobiscum
Molon Labe
Any chemical that is used in a OSHA regulated occupation has to a have a MSDS sheet. Most of the time you have to call the manufacturer and they will fax you a copy. Our MSDS folder is about 2 feet thick, and it includes three brake cleaners including the NEVR SEEZ kind.

Be careful with this stuff. Minimal use won't lead to cancer, but the greater the exposure the greater the risk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
I've used brake cleaner to get a really nasty gun back into shape, but for normal cleaning, I don't bother. I'm not exactly worried about it's carcinogenic effects--I was a mechanic for years. Way I figure it, what difference will another blast or two on my fingers make at this point?


Later!

--Coop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,305 Posts
In reference to the effects of such things on plastics I wouldn't base any judgements on a "quick test" when it comes to critical parts like synthetic pistol frames. Even if a few dousings don't cause a visible surface breakdown or other effect, repeated use over time might cause brittleness and pre-mature aging of the material that may manifest itself more severely at a later time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Try rubbing alcohol - works as well but is cheaper and isn't so hard on the hands. Doesn't effect plastic or other parts.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top