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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Brass shavings and Jams (Picture)

Hi, I had some problems with my Kimber custom target II during my last range visit. Hoping someone here can advise.

I had a round fail to chamber. After clearing, I noticed a couple very small pieces of brass, mainly near the firing pin area. I wiped the brass shaving away and continued to shoot. Sure enough, another round did not chamber and I noticed more small brass shavings. I stopped shooting with two (2) jams in 100 rounds. It's hard to describe the jam; the slide was not closed and the cartridge was wedged at an angle.

I saved the two jammed cartridges. Both have dents, one has two dents connected with a scratch, in the side of the case. It looks like the dents could have been caused by the part of the slide that strips the cartridge out of the magazine.

The pistol is a Kimber 45ACP with 2300 rounds through it. I have not done any maintenance other than cleaning it after every range visit. I was using a relatively new Wilson Combat 8 round stainless magazine with about 500 rounds through it. I've shot all kinds of ball ammo, I was using Federal American Eagle. I'd like to blame the ammo, but I've been using American Eagle for a while with no problems.

This is my only pistol, and has been very reliable so far. I've had it for a year and a half. If anyone has any ideas or knows a good gunsmith in NJ, please reply. Thanks
 

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Try dropping the slide on some snap caps or dummy rounds. Most people probably don't have snap caps or dummy rounds. If you're going to drop the slide on live rounds .....please be careful.
 

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You're describing a classic "failure to feed" (FTF) malfunction and there are several causes.

If you have a different magazine, try that instead. Is it the last round in the magazine that jams? If so, that's a common problem with some magazines.

Another possibility is a build up of jacket material or other fouling on the feed ramp or in the chamber, preventing the round from entering the chamber completely.

It may be that you are loosening your grip as you become more relaxed with the pistol and therefore the slide does not cycle properly. That is a common cause of such FTF's.

I wouldn't worry about the brass on the breechface near the firing pin; most likely that is a result of brass being deposited from the headstamp area of the case during recoil and you will always get this. If the shavings are larger than a speck of sand, look like a small sliver, and are near the extractor, it could be that your extractor is cutting into the brass and interfering with chambering.

I am not too familiar with the Custom Target II -- does your owner's manual specifiy if or when to replace the recoil spring?

-Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Dave, thanks for the info.

The brass shavings on the breechface were small slivers. I've never noticed them before and I don't think they were normal brass fouling. I'll check to see if they were concentrating around the extractor next range visit.

The feed ramp and chamber are clean, & I'll check my grip and use a different magazine. The manual doesn't mention when to change the recoil spring.

John
 

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Check the area at the chamber mouth for any sharp edges. Also check the extractor hook and the space right behind the hook for sharp edges. The bottom part of the hook should be rounded on the inside bottom and so should the area behind it. That is where the case has to come up under the extractor. If it is caught on a sharp edge, it can't rise and chamber.

Jim
 

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In addition to the above...

It might help to take some fired brass (no bullet, no powder, no primer) and, with the slide off, check how easy the brass slips up and behind the extractor.

If the extractor does not allow the rim of the brass to slide behind it, because of accumulated grit or being "out of tune", this will prevent chambering.

-Dave
 

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Hi, Guys,

Note that my comment on the extractor has nothing to do with its being "out of tune"; it has to do with the configuration of the extractor itself.

In addition to making extractors out of cheaper material than the spring steel that should be used, many makers do not configure them correctly, leaving sharp edges that can dig into the case and interfere with feeding. The tension of the extractor has little to do with this; even a strong tension will not cause feeding problems if the extractor is properly made.

The solution is simple and requires only a few file strokes, but many makers don't take the time.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I purchased a new Wilson recoil spring and fired 50 rounds with the factory 7 round today with no FTF's. However, there are still some brass shavings. They seemed to be mainly on the extractor side of the breech face. I can't tell where they are coming from by looking at fired cases. I saved the two largest ones for a pic. Most were quite small.

There are no obvious burrs or sharp edges on the extractor. I can place a round on the breech face pretty easily, although there is some resistance.

Thanks for the replies, some good info here. I'm probably going to have a smith take a look.

Pic:
 
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