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I have a question about cleaning my new Para PXT. I have had my gun for about six months now and have never performed a complete break down for cleaning purposes. The reason being is that the manual that came with the gun states that the gun should be cleaned only by removing/breaking down the top half of the gun (slide, bushing, barrel, etc). The manual goes on to say that should the user break the gun down any further (mag release, disconnector, sear, trigger, etc) would VOID the warranty and that it should be done only by a professional gun smith.

Why would this be? Colt, SA, Kimber, etc do not seem to place this restrictions on owners of their guns, why would Para?
 

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I have a question about cleaning my new Para PXT. I have had my gun for about six months now and have never performed a complete break down for cleaning purposes. The reason being is that the manual that came with the gun states that the gun should be cleaned only by removing/breaking down the top half of the gun (slide, bushing, barrel, etc). The manual goes on to say that should the user break the gun down any further (mag release, disconnector, sear, trigger, etc) would VOID the warranty and that it should be done only by a professional gun smith.

Why would this be? Colt, SA, Kimber, etc do not seem to place this restrictions on owners of their guns, why would Para?

blueorb,

The manual is right. One only need to field strip the pistol for general cleaning. Anything farther is vastly unnecessary.


rimfire,22
 

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Discussion Starter #3
blueorb,

The manual is right. One only need to field strip the pistol for general cleaning. Anything farther is vastly unnecessary.


rimfire,22

Funny how many opinions there are on this. What about after 2500-3000 rounds? Do you never clean your pistol beyond a field strip clean?

Thanks.
 

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I completely strip the frame on a new pistol to get all of the dirt, shavings, grit, etc that's put there from manufacturing. After that, I never strip the frame. I flush it out with brake parts cleaner, blow it with compressed air, spray aerosol CLP in hit, allow the excess to drain and then I blow it out again. I don't need to do a disassembly except to replace pars.. YMMV.
 

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I completely strip the frame on a new pistol to get all of the dirt, shavings, grit, etc that's put there from manufacturing. After that, I never strip the frame. I flush it out with brake parts cleaner, blow it with compressed air, spray aerosol CLP in hit, allow the excess to drain and then I blow it out again. I don't need to do a disassembly except to replace pars.. YMMV.

+1

I do basically the same thing, only I use Berrymans B-12 carb. cleaner.
 

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Funny how many opinions there are on this. What about after 2500-3000 rounds? Do you never clean your pistol beyond a field strip clean?

Thanks.


blueorb,

Regardless of how many rounds are fired through my 45's I never go beyond a field stripping
Again it's just not necessary. Cleaning fluid and a nylon tooth brush is all I need to clean the frame and slide minus the barrel. That I need my rod and cleaning brush.


rimfire,22
 

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Other than LDA's (I'm chicken) I've been known to pull 'em apart all the way....

Nothing to it, once you've done it once or twice.

That said, have a manual or other instructions (or a friend) handy. Lots of little bits in the drop safety that are a little different and may not be in the usual manuals.

You can pop the grip safety and MSH, and get to most of the critical parts in the frame - including an LDA. Some spray degreaser and spray lubricants will do a fairly good job on the goodies in the frame, without actually taking them out. DO re-lubricate everything later.... Spray oils (I like Rem Oil a lot) can do that. Just not WD-40! :D

The slides are simple enough (assuming you've got some info on the way the drop safety works) to pull apart. IMHO, the PXT needs to be removed and cleaned (and re-lubricated) every once in a while. The tunnel gets dirty and that may slightly interfere with the extractor. Likewise, the firing pin tube needs a Q-tip (and a pipe cleaner) once in a while too.

The 1911 was originally designed as a throwaway. To be made at the lowest possible price on tooling (and with materials) that existed at the time. They're designed to be repaired by a cook detailed as a truck driver using parts from battlefield pickups. It's not rocket science....

The Colt drop safety and Kimber's Swartz (also used in Llamas and S&W's 1911's) are additional complications that require a bit more care but given that you can't get a Kimber rear sight off anyway (necessary to work on the Swartz safety) without a jackhammer, it's a non-issue if you don't lose the little pin in the frame. You can still manage to damage the pin in normal "just take the top off" cleaning. (Pre-Series-II Kimbers don't seem to have their rear sights on quite as tightly. Or at least mine didn't....)

The LDA and similar strangeness is another story. Para's PXT is a little more complicated, but is also a drop-in. If you don't break something you won't hurt anything. I would suggest NOT taking a PXT apart without some serious care - there are a few little parts in there.... That can go flying....

Regards,
 

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The Para single actions are licensed Series 80 pistols and fully disassemble exactly the same way. The M1911 was designed to completely disassemble by ordinary soldiers and you should have no trouble. Just be sure you know how to replace the Series 80 parts and don't lose any of them. Also note how the PXT extractor assembles.

Regardless of the "void the warranty" nonsense you should learn to completely disassemble a M1911. It's a manly skill! Skip the brake cleaner, gun scrubber, and simple green unless you want to damage the pistol. The only thing ya need is CLP, a small brush, a couple of rags, and Bore Snake.

The best instructions for M1911 maintenance are the 1980s edition of Army Field Manual FM23-35, usually available at the local gun show. Complete instructions with photos. Only the PXT and Series 80 parts differ.

-- Chuck
 
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