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Breaking Even?

3851 Views 125 Replies 38 Participants Last post by  RetiredRod
I have recently added .45 ACP to my collection of firearms and had forgotten how much I really enjoy shooting the 1911. I have also recently retired so I have a little more time on my hands so I was considering the possibilities of reloading. If I venture into reloading I will probable load .45 ACP and 300 Blackout rounds.

I have had a minimal of experience many years ago with my father as a teenager. I know I have a lot of studying and catching up to do.

I know the economy has been rough on all of us and reloading cost has gone up as well.

So My question is: Roughly, At current cost of basic or what you would think needed reloading equipment and supplies. Approximately how many rounds would be needed to be loaded to break even on the cost of equipment and supplies? I known prices vary a lot. I'm just trying to get a rough idea of feasibility?
Thanks.
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Saving money by reloading is the lie you tell your wife to get your gear. Breaking even after xxxxx number of bullets is the lie you tell yourself to get you deeper down the rabbit hole.

the truth be told you get into reloading so you can spend more time at the range per 100 dollars. No savings involved, just more quality time with your firearms.
Yeah, I've figured that out. I was just trying to lie to myself since I don't have a wife to boss me around. ;)
It is kinda like the lie about how buying a motorcycle is going to save money on gasoline. 馃弽
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Whilst one is lying to themselves, it is a good idea to remember that you can produce a box of loaded ammo that is more accurate and far less expensive than store bought. Box for box, case for case, it doesn鈥檛 matter, one鈥檚 choice to go out and blast three times as much has nothing to do with the comparative! 馃檪 Just the cost of one nice set of golf clubs will set a guy up with all the equipment he needs that will last a lifetime. Clubs cost you money, loading equipment makes it!
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You are not going to break even at all. Unless you are a competitor. Bidenomics and the Scamdemic have pretty well ruined that for a few years.

The point to reloading is:
  1. The relaxation/enjoyment
  2. the precision/quality of your work
  3. shooting what you have made and
  4. collecting, cleaning it all and doing it again.
So far, the only "profit" I see on the horizon was: the prices I saw on PMC 223rem last week were almost low enough that it was cheaper to buy their ammo, pull the bullet, dump the powder and rebuild them from there: component-wise it would save a nickel per case (the cost of new brass+primer+bullet)
You omitted Bidenflation
Saving money by reloading is the lie you tell your wife to get your gear. Breaking even after xxxxx number of bullets is the lie you tell yourself to get you deeper down the rabbit hole.

the truth be told you get into reloading so you can spend more time at the range per 100 dollars. No savings involved, just more quality time with your firearms.
It's not vodoo... just basic math. Sure, some people lie about it but many of us actually tracked the spending.

I got into reloading because I couldn't afford to shoot 45acp as much as I wanted. Traded golf for reloading and spent more time at home and the son started loading as well... it was an all around family win. I wish more people experienced it that way.
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I have recently added .45 ACP to my collection of firearms and had forgotten how much I really enjoy shooting the 1911. I have also recently retired so I have a little more time on my hands so I was considering the possibilities of reloading. If I venture into reloading I will probable load .45 ACP and 300 Blackout rounds.

I have had a minimal of experience many years ago with my father as a teenager. I know I have a lot of studying and catching up to do.

I know the economy has been rough on all of us and reloading cost has gone up as well.

So My question is: Roughly, At current cost of basic or what you would think needed reloading equipment and supplies. Approximately how many rounds would be needed to be loaded to break even on the cost of equipment and supplies? I known prices vary a lot. I'm just trying to get a rough idea of feasibility?
Thanks.
Well it depends on how much you value your time!! I enjoy reloading just for the fun of it, I didnt get into it fir money. My kids and grandkids get to see how its done, and even fire them at the range鈥. So to me that is sn added benifit money cant buy.
Primers, powder and boolits are still hit or miss on availability here in deep south La.
But its part of the process.
Makes you appreciate ammo when you do it yourself too.
Id say go for it, you will learn a lot and can say you reload in coversations and meet people of like interests.
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Look at reloading as a hedge against future ammo shortages caused by elections and gooberment activity. Stock on essential components so you can still enjoy shooting when crap hits the fan.
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Well it depends on how much you value your time!! I enjoy reloading just for the fun of it, I didnt get into it fir money. My kids and grandkids get to see how its done, and even fire them at the range鈥. So to me that is sn added benifit money cant buy.
Primers, powder and boolits are still hit or miss on availability here in deep south La.
But its part of the process.
Makes you appreciate ammo when you do it yourself too.
Id say go for it, you will learn a lot and can say you reload in coversations and meet people of like interests.
I got into it when I started shooting a lot . Then I started shootsin
I got into it when I started shooting a lot . Then I started shootsin
Then I started shooting Bullseye Matches. When you shoot 180 rounds ( 45 ) in a match it doesn't take long to realize you need to reload unless you have very very deep pockets . I would shoot 4-500 rounds a week in practice unless there was a match or two then it was more.
[...]so you can still enjoy shooting when crap hits the fan.
Or, shoot yer way out of it.
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Well it depends on how much you value your time!! I enjoy reloading just for the fun of it, I didnt get into it fir money. My kids and grandkids get to see how its done, and even fire them at the range鈥. So to me that is sn added benifit money cant buy.
I agree but for those who read the first line the other way- with my 550 I can comfortably load a sustained 300 rounds/hr. which includes filling primer tubes and spot checking powder drops. In 45acp, I save roughly 25-30 cents per round. 300 x .25 = $75/hr. (minimum) I'm thrilled "making" $75 hr for doing something i enjoy. I mean hey, I could be on the couch or watching tv for nothing. :unsure:

Most hobbies cost money and time- reloading is time spent augmenting another hobby and reducing the cost of it.
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I agree but for those who read the first line the other way- with my 550 I can comfortably load a sustained 300 rounds/hr. which includes filling primer tubes and spot checking powder drops. In 45acp, I save roughly 25-30 cents per round. 300 x .25 = $75/hr. (minimum) I'm thrilled "making" $75 hr for doing something i enjoy. I mean hey, I could be on the couch or watching tv for nothing. :unsure:

Most hobbies cost money and time- reloading is time spent augmenting another hobby and reducing the cost of it.
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My wife gifted me a Hornady lock and load single stage with all the fixins so that has been my setup dinfe i started鈥.so that is more time comsuming.,..but i like my setup.
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I don't break even. I don't even track it anymore. I do, however, have fun shooting relatively inexpensive ammo I put together. Fun is an important reloading component. I load mostly .45 acp, some FMJ, but mostly cast lead round nose (similar to FMJ). I enjoy putting together what is usually pretty clean, accurate ammo. Don't break even, but I don't lose either. Fun is where you find it.
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All things have limitations, of course.....but when it comes to hobbies it may not be wise getting too analytical as to the specifics......may scare you off from every trying. "Aww that's too expensive....I'll just pass".


Life is too short to not enjoy it.



Have fun.


All things within reason, of course....but the satisfaction of fun & constructive self-reliance is well reinforced when you see your first sub-MOA handload groupings.....or kill your first deer with some loads you developed.






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Fun is an important reloading component.
Quoted for truth!
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Fun is known by the state of California to have cancer causing effects in laboratory animals. There will be a fun tax added to your next take it up the ass property assessment. 馃悁
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Well my first set of books are in, I'm about half way through the Lee Modern Reloading 2nd Edition. It is a good and easy read. Like he says its like having a conversation with a friend. Well written. I have definitely already learned a quite a few things.

I went to one of my local suppliers and of coarse he does not have large primers but does have a selection of small primers various brands at about the same price as the internet without the Hazmat. fees.
So I went ahead and order a set of dyes, and 500 small pocket .45 caliber brass.
I will buy the primers and powder from the local dealer to avoid the Hazmat fees and possible bullets.

I will definitely be looking more into the 300 BLK as their is a much larger cost savings in that. I don't shoot it much but it is because it is expensive and there is a good saving for the .40 S&W as well. I can already see this is going to grow a bit.

I was planning on working out of my shop out back since I already have the bench and space but it is not climate controlled and it is very humid down here in the south.

So now I am thinking of converting storage room (6ft x 10ft ) Shelves on two walls in garage and putting a bench in there. I would have to add better lighting, but has a lockable door, inside of locked attached garage. Still not totally climate controlled but I have plenty of space to keep powder and primers in laundry room cabinets next door which is climate controlled.

Thoughts and suggestions are welcome as how to set up as I am setting up from scratch, I would rather do it once than do it over.
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Good Choices.. "dies" and, believe it or not, the chances are better to order bullets online.

LGS bullets will never really be what you want, just "something". You'll find coated, cast bullets work very well in the 45 - and I suspect gas-checked (GC) cast would work well in the BO as well.

Enjoy 2nd edition - Lee's book is an excellent read and resource.
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Yeah, I've figured that out. I was just trying to lie to myself since I don't have a wife to boss me around. ;)
It is kinda like the lie about how buying a motorcycle is going to save money on gasoline. 馃弽
You are telling me the 3 motorcycle plan isn't saving me money? Uh oh.
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