1911Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Have you guys ever heard of "breaking in the barrel" of a new gun? I guy that I was talking to suggested that this is what I should do with my new Kimber. I never heard of it so I thought I would ask here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Originally posted by mlbdg:
Have you guys ever heard of "breaking in the barrel" of a new gun? I guy that I was talking to suggested that this is what I should do with my new Kimber. I never heard of it so I thought I would ask here.
I always use a certain procedure when "breaking in" a new rifle, but I've never done it with any pistol I've owned.

What I do with a rifle is:
1.clean bore and chamber
2.fire one round
3.run saturated patch through bore followed by dry patch.
3. repeat 1-3 for a total of 5 rounds.
4. repeat above procedures increasing by one shot after each cycle until you work up to 5 rounds.
5. then shoot 10 rounds
6. then blast away!

some say overkill...some say not enough break in.

YMMV
Mike
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,948 Posts
Yes, I will break in new barrels for anyone that wants to send their new possession to me, along with significant quantities of their choice of ammo.......or......you could follow mn2deep's advice, although the benefits of doing this with a hangun barrel (even a custom match grade barrel) will probably be marginal.

Just shoot the damn thing and have fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,137 Posts
Shoot it.Pistols aren't going to benefit from it for the ranges they're used at.I do try to keep the first box jacketed bullets,but my second most accurate 45 has only had about 45 lead rounds through the naw barrel (Bar-Sto BTW).Don't sweat the petty things,pet the sweaty things
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,649 Posts
This is the exact method I was trained to use, and I've been shooting 30 years and haven't changed yet.
Originally posted by mn2deep:
I always use a certain procedure when "breaking in" a new rifle, but I've never done it with any pistol I've owned.

What I do with a rifle is:
1.clean bore and chamber
2.fire one round
3.run saturated patch through bore followed by dry patch.
3. repeat 1-3 for a total of 5 rounds.
4. repeat above procedures increasing by one shot after each cycle until you work up to 5 rounds.
5. then shoot 10 rounds
6. then blast away!

some say overkill...some say not enough break in.

YMMV
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
First I ever heard of this. Could be that the guy that made that recommendation didn't know that most guns, especially the quality ones, are proof tested before they leave the factory.

What does proof tested mean? They shoot 'em.
The ones that don't blow up, bulge, or otherwise break during proof testing are therefore "broken in."

Wear ear and eye protection anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
My "break-in" procedure is to field-strip the gun, remove all of the preservative oil, and clean and inspect the piece. I make sure the bore is completely clean and free of oil or grease. Then I lube the gun, using Tetra-Gun Grease on the rails and locking-lugs, and Break-Free CLP everywhere else.

Next, I go to the range and fire 100 to 150 rounds of new, U.S. manufactured, full metal jacket ammo. I use Federal American Eagle, Speer Lawman, or Winchester White Box.

Then, I field-strip, clean, inspect and lube as above.

In a few days, I shoot 100-150 more rounds of FMJ ammo, then clean, inspect, and lube again.

The full metal jacket bullets will smooth-up the bore, making it easier to clean.

-Mk.IV

[This message has been edited by Mark IV Series 80 (edited 10-14-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
I ALWAYS fire a hundred or more jacketed rounds through a new barrel before trying cast bullets. This always seemed reasonable to me, and it proved itself to me with a new S&W 686 a few years ago. An older similar gun didn't lead with a certain load, and the new one did. After 200 rounds of jackted bullets, the leading stopped in the newer gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Originally posted by feedramp:
First I ever heard of this. Could be that the guy that made that recommendation didn't know that most guns, especially the quality ones, are proof tested before they leave the factory.

What does proof tested mean? They shoot 'em.
The ones that don't blow up, bulge, or otherwise break during proof testing are therefore "broken in."

Wear ear and eye protection anyway.

The procedure I listed is not about "Proof Testing" a firearm for reliability. It is the well known and accepted method used to break in a rifle barrel to insure that the rifle shoots to it's full accuracy potential.

Here's a few notes that offer an explanation of the reason for breaking in from the Krieger Barrels website: http://www.kriegerbarrels.com/break_in_and_cleaning.html

Happy shooting
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,987 Posts
...just get a case of ammo and shoot the crap out of it! If that doesn't do it, stay at it 'til that sucker runs right!!!

...Welcome to the forum...


------------------
>>>>>>>>>>g2<<<<<<<<<<

!!!Molon Labe'!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
Originally posted by mn2deep:

The procedure I listed is not about "Proof Testing" a firearm for reliability. It is the well known and accepted method used to break in a rifle barrel to insure that the rifle shoots to it's full accuracy potential.

(snipped for brevity)

My remark was in reference to the original question that mlbdg asked. Until he posted his question, I had never heard of anyone "breaking in" a barrel. Sorry for the confusion.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top