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so do you use one? do you like it?

how did you cut the lugs before you got it?

I have always used a file to cut the lugs on the barrel, but I seem to be building more guns lately and using this tool seems like it would give a good fit.

also

it comes in two sizes 186 and 195, in the catalog it warns that if you use the 195 cutter on some frame, slide, barrel the fit maybe a little loose, how come? the pin is 199 so the 195 cutter should never produce a loose fit or am I missing something?

thanks
sno
 

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I have the .186 cutter. Show me a .186 or close slide stop, exactly, not there. I too have read the warning for using the .195, I don't see it happening. After I use the .186 cutter I still have a huge amount of filing to do, sort of defeats the purpose. I would be buying a .195 cutter for future use, but I just got a milling machine and I am going to be doing future work on the mill with the Jack Weigand barrel fitting fixture.

Good luck
 

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a little loose, how come? the pin is 199 so the 195 cutter should never produce a loose fit or am I missing something?

thanks
sno [/B][/QUOTE]

Sno;
The cross pin diameter is secondary to the height that you cut the lugs. That's one of the problems with that particular system[lug cutters] of fitting the lugs. It's not very precise. Even though the lug cutter is .195, it "may" remove more metal than necessary for proper lug height, on some guns, thus causing the loose fit that they're referring to. The .186 cutter will require filing. Again, any thing but precise.
In reality, it's the C/L distance between two axis' .. The cross pin C/L axis and the barrel channel C/L axis . The pin radius is the easy part.

Jerry
 
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