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I am not aware of any HP that exploded from any ammunition except a huge overload, like a double charge, or a barrel obstruction, or something similar.
But you can beat the gun to death with overly hot loads. It won't explode, at least not very soon. But the unlocking cam can crack or become loose in the frame. Engagement lugs on the barrel and slide can get peened over. Slide can develop cracks. Etc. And it may not function reliably with really hot stuff.

Many years ago I was testing some 115 +P for my department from a small specialty company that most people here would recognize. It was advertised as 1350 fps but chronographed at 1399 fps, which is about 75 fps faster than Winchester +P+. Out of 10 rds fired, 3 of them had the empty case "stovepipe" because the extractor ripped right through the rim. That was factory ammo that supposedly met the SAAMI standards for 9mm +P. No damage to the gun, but I threw away the rest of the box. And after various problems with that and other brands, I stopped using any "boutique" ammo in any of my guns.
I had more problems with about 250 rds (total, various calibers) of boutique ammo than with many thousands from the big names.
 

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Does anyone read manuals that come with the gun?

AM M U N I T I O N
DO NOT USE AMMUNITION OTHER THAN WHAT IS INSCRIBED ON THE
EXPOSED PORTION OF THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE BARREL. EXAMINE EVERY
CARTRIDGE YOU PUT IN YOUR FIREARM. FAILURE TO FOLLOW THESE
WARNINGS COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH.

WE DO NOT RECOMMEND FIRING OVERPRESSURE LOADS (+P OR +P+)
IN ANY HI POWER PISTOL. THESE LOADS CAN INCREASE CHAMBER
PRESSURES AND MAY ALSO ACCELERATE WEAR ON COMPONENTS SUCH AS
THE SLIDE, FRAME AND RECOIL SPRING DUE TO INCREASED RECOIL
LEVELS. OVERPRESSURE LOADS CAN ALSO AFFECT THE RELIABILITY OF
YOUR PISTOL
 

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Does anyone read manuals that come with the gun?
...
Does anyone read about lawyers and manuals?
A recent car of mine had 42 pages about why you should wear a seat belt, don't drive when drunk, etc.

When I went to the Glock Armorer/Instructor school, the manual still said to avoid +P+.
The instructor said there were several departments that used nothing but +P+ for years, and their guns were doing just fine.

Hotter ammo wears a HP out sooner than a Glock, but the final MKIII's were pretty tolerant of it, including mine.
Everything wears out eventually.
 

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Does anyone read about lawyers and manuals?
A recent car of mine had 42 pages about why you should wear a seat belt, don't drive when drunk, etc.

When I went to the Glock Armorer/Instructor school, the manual still said to avoid +P+.
The instructor said there were several departments that used nothing but +P+ for years, and their guns were doing just fine.

Hotter ammo wears a HP out sooner than a Glock, but the final MKIII's were pretty tolerant of it, including mine.
Everything wears out eventually.
(y)
 

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Does anyone read about lawyers and manuals?
A recent car of mine had 42 pages about why you should wear a seat belt, don't drive when drunk, etc.

When I went to the Glock Armorer/Instructor school, the manual still said to avoid +P+.
The instructor said there were several departments that used nothing but +P+ for years, and their guns were doing just fine.

Hotter ammo wears a HP out sooner than a Glock, but the final MKIII's were pretty tolerant of it, including mine.
Everything wears out eventually.
I don't know if the ammo choice is written up at the behest of lawyers. Most of the other common sense safety crap is, though, I'll give you that.

I just follow what the manual says. Crazy, I know...
 

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I don't know if the ammo choice is written up at the behest of lawyers. Most of the other common sense safety crap is, though, I'll give you that.

I just follow what the manual says. Crazy, I know...
Definitely not crazy.
In fact, pretty smart if you use the gun just for range or competition.
If you carry the gun to save your life, hotter loads may make sense if the other characteristics of the ammo are good, it functions reliably, and you accept that your gun won't last forever.

As previously mentioned, there are big differences in ammo and in the strength of Hi Powers.
A late cast Mk III with major brand +P or even +P+ should have a long life.
An early production HP shot with +P+ would probably have a short and unhappy life.

The HP's made before or shortly after WWII are beautiful guns but I think they're pretty soft.
I recall an article about Belgian Browning bolt action rifles, written by a gunsmith, who said the ones made shortly after WWII that he had worked on were a very low carbon steel that he described as "barely heat-treatable." I doubt that the HP's made around that time had steel that was any stronger. A WWII instructor once wrote that the 1911's he used would often develop frame cracks at about 7k rds. Men were tougher back then, but not guns.
 

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^^^^^
This was WWII, so they were using GI ball; some of it brass cased and some had the steel cases that were hard on extractors but shouldn't make any difference to the frame.

The crack(s) he mentioned did not actually ruin the pistol, it was on the left side of the frame starting at the cutout for the slide stop and going up through the left rail at that location. IIRC, Colt on their 10mm 1911's cut away that part of the rail so it couldn't crack. I'm sure it would eventually go downward into the frame, but he made no mention of experiencing that. There were also reports of cracks starting at the slide stop hole, or where the dust cover meets the main body of the frame.

Most likely, none of there guns had the recoil spring replaced before cracking.
 

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>>...A recent car of mine had 42 pages about why you should wear a seat belt, don't drive when drunk, etc...<<<
The reason that there 42 pages of practical, common sense information and good advice is required is that (as has been unalterable, indisputable experience and examples) that there are, and always have been, far too many * STUPID PEOPLE * in the world, without benefit of proper adult supervision.

'..Pushing the envelope..' is a fine thing for highly trained, long-experienced air & spacecraft test pilots, who KNOW and UNDERSTAND the risks and have dedicated knowledgeable teams of support. This isn't so for most people who blithely labor under the profoundly mistaken impression that they '..know better..'.
 
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