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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just spent a week restoring an old fn high power that had the ugly scratched up painted finish. Mechanically the gun was in new condition, except for carry wear. I wanted to completely disassemble it and reblue it and improve the trigger. I knew the trigger pin would be a bitch to get out. At first i hit it with a large brass drift from the right to the left. I could drive it flush with the reciever, but after trying for 2 hrs. To drive it out with a small pin punch it would not move and i didn't want to ding up the frame on the gun, so i determined i would need a small arbor press from harbor frieght for $39 and i then used a small piece of brass 3/8 rod with the end ground to look like a pencil point, with a small blunt tip. The whole brass piece is only about a 1 1/2" long. I then place the frame on a wood block with a small hole drilled into it for the trigger pin to go thru. I then place the frame & wood block under the arbor press and then use the small brass pointed drift to press out the pin. Once the pin moves about a 1/16" under the frame the pin slides out easy. Note the brass drift may bend or break a few times , but after reshaping it, it will press out the pin fine. I then bought a new trigger pin from brownells that drives in easy with a plastic hammer. I also bought steves camps disassembly manual. It helped me take the gun apart. Also you can make a small steel drift pin out of a ground down drill bit smaller than the trigger pin, but the hard pin may still damage the hole if you slip. The brass punch is still the way to go as it will not hurt the metal

Note ! I just bought another $350 FN painted high power, and began the disassembly and the trigger pin removal above failed to work even with the arbor press and using cut down drill bits it snapped 4 bits in a row with out moving. This one was stuck , but it did move flush with the reciever with a big brass drift and big hammer and about ten hard hits. I wasn't about to give up , but what I needed was a more durable bit to drive out the pin. What I used next was some old worn out phillips screw driver bits. I placed them into the cordless drill and held it up to a bench grider and used the drill and the grinder as a POLISH LATHE and turn the tip down to a round cylinder drift to about .075" , note the trigger pin is about .120" . I used this bit under the arbor press and it drove the pin out a little at a time. The ground down bit broke 3 times , but it finally drove the pin out about an 1/8" ( enough to safely use a regular steel drift punch and a big hammer. Note this pin had to be completely hammered out, Alot harder than the first one. I went thru all this to not ding up the reciever and I was very successfull.
 

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mag safety removal

i am either dumb, stupid or just slightly confused. i have removed the mag safety 'guts' from two Hi-Powers. all i did was drive the pin out of the trigger (NOT the trigger pin but the little pin visible going THRU the trigger laterally) and pulled the 'guts' out thru the mag-well. both have had thousands of rounds thru them since. am i missing something? my BHP is an FN 84 mkII and the other was a friends newer practical.
 

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Hello. No, the magazine disconnect guts can be removed that way. I did so on many '70's vintage Hi Powers. On some later-made Hi Powers, the trigger assembly requires being removed. I am not sure exactly where the cuttoff date is but on my early run Mk II, "245PV" serial number, bought in March of '86, the trigger had to be removed to take out the disconnector parts.


Best.
 

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I read the trigger 101 and for the life of me cant understand what side this should come out of.

What side of the marker do I need facing up when removing the trigger pin?

The board side left side when shooting
The backside of the boardright side when shooting
 

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Discussion Starter #7
pin direction

the trigger pin is tapered and in meant to be driven from right to left for removal. Hit the trigger pin with a hammer from the ejection port side or right side of gun.
 

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the trigger pin is tapered and in meant to be driven from right to left for removal. Hit the trigger pin with a hammer from the ejection port side or right side of gun.
Hello,

The pin isn't tapered, it's original spec is .117" Dia. from end to end, the hole in the R.H. Side of the frame is under sized, so be sure to drive the pin out from Right to Left. The current production Matte Finished Trigger Pin's measure .1176" Dia. all the way across.
 

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Guys, I'd try a DIY on the magazine safety if I knew that it could be accomplished by simply removing the retaining pin from the trigger. Is there any way to know in advance if the magazine safety removal will require the removal of the entire trigger assembly? Thanks for the help.

KLR
 

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Steve, what is it that prevents the disconnect from being removed? Is it how the frame is formed, the over all tightness or something else? I appreciate you thoughts.

KLR
 

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use a nail setting or "cupped" punch on the pin. The tip of the pin will sit in the cup so it CANNOT slip off. Once pin is slightly below ths frame use a standard brass punch to finish driving it out.
 

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Stephen A. Camp said:
Hello. No, the magazine disconnect guts can be removed that way. I did so on many '70's vintage Hi Powers. On some later-made Hi Powers, the trigger assembly requires being removed. I am not sure exactly where the cuttoff date is but on my early run Mk II, "245PV" serial number, bought in March of '86, the trigger had to be removed to take out the disconnector parts.


Best.



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Generally, you are better off using an aluminum drift as opposed to brass, since brass can work harden under repeated blows to the point where it will deform steel. Also, aluminum will only leave a silvery stain on the steel which is easily removed with a bit of solvent, while brass can permanently remove bluing. In over fifty years of use I have never had aluminum work harden to the point where it would deform steel. I sometimes use old X-acto knife handles as punches.

(Edit: Had to remove an erroneous statement; Was thinking of another make of gun.)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Generally, you are better off using an aluminum drift as opposed to brass, since brass can work harden under repeated blows to the point where it will deform steel. Also, aluminum will only leave a silvery stain on the steel which is easily removed with a bit of solvent, while brass can permanently remove bluing. In over fifty years of use I have never had aluminum work harden to the point where it would deform steel. I sometimes use old X-acto knife handles as punches.

(Edit: Had to remove an erroneous statement; Was thinking of another make of gun.)
Your wrong in this situation, the problem with using aluminum as a punch is that it is a lot harder than brass and can actually take bluing off, and using it as a punch, it is to lite of a material and can not transfer enough force to the pin. I have never seen a brass punch remove bluing or parkerizing, unless it had a sharp or jagged edge that would work as a knife edge etc.

Punches or drifts should always have any sharp edges or mushrooming metal remove from them prior to use, for saftey and to avoid damaging the item being worked on.

Brass is a lot more dense than aluminum and far better suited in this situation.
 

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I found this thread after struggling with the trigger axis pin on a matte hp and bought a small HF arbor press as suggested (btw, simple green takes the smell of the preservative away). I was going to use a ground screwdriver bit or brass rod as suggested, but remembered that security bits have hollow ends to fit over the pins in screws. HF has a set on sale for $6.99 so i wasn't concerned with messing them up. Found a round strong but thin round magnet that sticks to the bottom of the ram and holds the bit firmly, the magnet eventually broke in half, but i didn't care since it holds the bit somewhat square and securely. I taped the pin and receiver with electrical tape to be safe and used scraps of leather to pad the receiver and to get it somewhat level. Selected a smallish diameter bit that fit over the tapered point of the axis pin, and the pin broke free easily. I used an even smaller diameter bit to press the pin all the way out. About $40, but i can use the press and bits for other things.

Joe
 

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My current mkiii is harder than hell to move, I think its slightly misaligned. My inglis is pretty easy to remove. I'm gonna try to fit the trigger to the frame. I think the holes are slightly misaligned in mine...
 
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