1911Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, and thanks for the wealth of information provided here. I need just a little advice:

I've read many threads here, and after digesting all of the information I've collected from many different sources, I've decided to purchase a Blued 1991. I realize that there exist myriad opinions on which manufacturer or type of 1911 is best, and I appreciate those. For me, this is the best decision.

Now then, I understand that there can be some variation among and between pistols of the same make and model in terms of triggers and fit and finish. Aisde from the obvious blemishes in appearance, what should I look for when I go to the Gun Shop? I hope to compare several "identical" 1991's, and to choose the best among them. What criteria, then, should I use for comparison? That is, what points should I look at so that I can get the pick of the litter? There are no tires to kick, and so aside from looking for scratches, and pulling a trigger or two, I'm a little lost.

I know that this type of nit-picking may border on neurotic, but I'd like to buy the best once.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,394 Posts
Just to affirm your decision, the current production 1991 Colts are an excellent choice. Better metallurgy than the other production 1911s, with the unique Colt "feel" - a combination of balance and shapes that are often copied, but seldom duplicated. All guns save "Reissues" of classic models come with a stainless steel barrel -and all come with the new Colt exclusive "Dimple" throating. My XSE feeds empties, right out of the blue Colt shipping box. And most models come with the really pretty double diamond stocks. "Forged in USA" frames, slides, barrels and slide stops. Most other parts machined, with very little MIM and good parts integrity and reliability.

Plus, at no extra charge you get the Colt Heritage - the Right Arm of American warriors since 1836. From the Seminole War in Florida, used by both sides in the Civil War, the Wild West, Hickock, Earp, Cody, Teddy Roosevelt at San Juan, Alvin York, Frank Luke, Audie Murphy to the deserts of Iraq - the list using Colts is long and distinguished. That little horse has ridden with a lot of good men.

Here's my "quick and dirty guide" I suggest to customers when choosing from several ("Cherrypicking") of the same model 1911s - by any Manufacturer. Your priorities may vary from mine, but I base mine on how much trouble it is to change the item to my liking latter.

1.) Overall evaluation - are you satisfied with the cosmetics - finish, machining, rollmarks, slide frame even back around the hammer, dovetail cuts. Plunger tube tight against the frame with no movement. Left stock should bear against the plunger tube and retain it.

2.) Barrel fit. There should be very little to no movement of the barrel hood in the ejection port. (Assuming the barrel's "feet" are bearing evenly on the slide stop crosspin, the gun should shoot.) Barrel inside the bushing should have only slight play - a thousanth or two. This is easier to upgrade with a match bushing, if a greater level of accuracy is desired, and so is of much less concern than the fit at the back.
Slide to frame fit should have some slight play in a carry 1911 - just as John Mose Browning designed it - the effect on accuracy is miniscule. The effect on reliability of "too tight" is a real concern on a serious pistol, should it have to run dirty or dry - the clonemakers have it wrong. (Current 1991s reflect Colt's return to this "pre-WWII" fitment - good barrel fit, slight, deliberate slide play.)

3.) Feel of the thumb safety (it should "click" on and off in a positive manner.) If it is mushy, it can be corrected, but again, we are choosing from several guns.

4.) Trigger pull. Both weight and "creep". Although this is important, it is more likely to improve with use and easier to deal with than if any of the preceeding items are less than 100%. By the way, the Series 80 safety is pretty much undetectable in the trigger pull - contrary to what some gunshop commandos may tell you. And it makes the gun pretty much absolutely safe against discharge if dropped, and most parts failures - which are unlikely in a Colt, anyway.

With current Colt production, you are likely to get an entirely satisfactory gun. One of the better things about your choice is that Colt is giving excellent customer service these days. Anything that is less than satisfactory to you will be covered and remedied under warranty.

That's my short list - I just went through this with a customer Tuesday who was picking out a 1991 blue Commander from the three we had in stock. In his case the guns were so identical, it was finally decided by the one with the trigger he liked best. Good hunting - and enjoy your new Colt!

Warmly, Col. Colt

"Beware of Counterfeits & Patent Infringements" - Samuel Colt, mid-1850's Colt Newspaper Ad. Just as true 150 years later!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks Col. Colt for taking the time with a novice.

That was exactly the type of response I was hoping for. I'm really very grateful. Thanks very much.

I hope that you'll understand that you've made one man both very comfortable with his ultimate decision, and very happy with the years of pleasure that the weapon is sure to provide.

This site really is an outstanding web resource, and that because of people like you.

With enthusiasm,
HighpowerEX
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top