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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The last post on this topic was about 10 years ago. There are many advantages to having a C&R License, they are abundantly posted.

I want to know what the Disadvantages are of having one.
 

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Two things to know about C&R licenses: first you must keep a bound book with a record of your firearm purchases, and second ATF has a right to come inspect your home and collection if they deem it necessary. If you get sloppy with your record-keeping or don't like visitors in sunglasses and suits then you will have to think about that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Two things to know about C&R licenses:
I CAN NOT FIND the legal requirements on the ATF website. Why?

I have been "told" but can't verify that
-) a stapled printout is considered acceptable. I would rather keep an electronic copy of my transactions as I currently do, but obviously willing to do what is needed to meet with the rules.
-) "if" they MIB want to inspect, 99% of the time I can do it in their offices rather than mine.
-) I do not need to keep any records for inspections of acquisitions/dispositions that the C&R license is not used for.

I am not running a business and vary rarely part with a weapon once it enters the collection. But $10/year makes it much easier and will save money.
 

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I CAN NOT FIND the legal requirements on the ATF website. Why?

I have been "told" but can't verify that
-) a stapled printout is considered acceptable. I would rather keep an electronic copy of my transactions as I currently do, but obviously willing to do what is needed to meet with the rules.
-) "if" they MIB want to inspect, 99% of the time I can do it in their offices rather than mine.
-) I do not need to keep any records for inspections of acquisitions/dispositions that the C&R license is not used for.

I am not running a business and vary rarely part with a weapon once it enters the collection. But $10/year makes it much easier and will save money.
I had one from a few years when you start and renew you had to go see the chief of police and tell him all about yourself and why you need this C&R and what kind of firearms do you collect. Plus all the fingerprints and background checks records keeping . Then you had to hope the chief didn’t talk to others about what you do and where you live. Not really worth it for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I had one from a few years when you start and renew you had to go see the chief of police and tell him all about yourself and why you need this C&R and what kind of firearms do you collect. Plus all the fingerprints and background checks records keeping . Then you had to hope the chief didn’t talk to others about what you do and where you live. Not really worth it for me.
According the ATF.gov website, there are little "requirements" when applying.
"A photograph and fingerprint card are not required if you are applying for a Type 03 Collector of Curios and Relics license only."

Not really happy having my address on file with the ATF, but no local fuzz requirements that I can find. I am sure that the State of Texas has already given my address to the ATF my address when I got my CCL.
 

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You are correct that the bound book is only for firearms bought/sold using your C&R. The key thing to understand is that a C&R license is simply another type of FFL, and many of the same rules apply. The main difference is that you cannot use it to engage in the business of buying or selling guns, as it's only to build a personal collection. That and the fact that only eligible firearms may be purchased using it (i.e. 50+ years old or else on ATF's list of eligible firearms).

The reason why ATF requires a bound book is so that it's harder to add or remove transaction records after the fact, which an unscrupulous person might do especially if they're trying to use their C&R to buy and sell guns for profit. Your local FFL also uses the same type of book for his records as well.
 

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The only ATF requirement that involves the local police or whatever group has
jurisdiction over where you live (like State Police) is that when you renew your
license, you need to send a letter to them to notify the local Chief that you have
renewed it. No fingerprints, photos are required for this.

I've had a C&R license for 30 years and no "men in black" have ever visited.
They are spread a bit thin for messing with small volume guys like me. A
friend of mine, who was a noted collector and seller of M1 Garand rifles
got a yearly visit where they checked his bound book. No hassle he has
told me as long as your records are up to date.

All in all, a very worthwhile thing to have if you're trying to build your collection.
 

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I've had my C&R for 13+ years and I've never had to inform my COP of anything since the first license. I also have never had anyone want to inspect either my paperwork or my guns to determine if I have been honest in my buys with no sales.My "bound book" is simply a conglomeration of plastic sheets with paper records slipped inside. While it may not be "spec," I can't imagine there woud be any issue for which I would be at risk. I've bought maybe 50 or 60 guns since I began with none, either C&R or anything else, being sold. I even keep the dogs - fortunately only a couple. Since my C&R's are in their own safe, I don't have to worry about any future inspector checking my autos, SBR's, etc.
 

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So if you 4473 a gun that's over 50 years old it doesn't need to go into your A/D book? I was under the impression it did. And what happens to guns over 50 years old that you had prior to your C&R that you decide to get rid of? Do you have to log them into you A/D book & than log them out?

When I was in CA, there was a lot of benefits to a C&R due to exemptions for having it in written into CA law. But when I got to AZ, most dealers didn't even know what one was. And so many times I 4473'd a gun only to get it home and realize it was over 50 years old. And was under the impression it now needed to go into my A/D book.

As I rarely used it for on line purchases, I let mine expire.
 
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