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Hi there,
I'm new to the 1911s but have been reading the 1911 board for sometime. I did some research and choose a 1991 Commander as my 1st .45. I'm happy with my choice but am having some questions.

- The pistol shoots way left, about 6+" at 50 ft. The groups seem ok but I've never had a pistol shoot that far off. Has anyone else experienced this with their 1991? Is the solution as simple as moving the front sight or should I send it back to the factory?

- Speaking of the front sight, can this be replaced with one that is a bit more visable?

- I would like a couple quality 8rd mags. What manufacturers and types do you recommend?

- Because the grip safety digs into my hand when fired, is there any drop-in grip safety manufacturers / types you recommend.

Thanks, I appreciate any of your comments or suggestions.
 

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hello and welcome to 1911 land. i may not have the answers you're looking for, but i'll do my best.

1)maybe drift the rear sight to the left a tad...how's it shooting at closer ranges? there's a possibility that it could be shooter induced. if so, do some dry firing and warm up to that sweet 1911 trigger.
2)it can be replaced. might suggest taking to a smith if you're new to gunsmithing.
3) www.wilsoncombat.com
4) wilson combat as well as kings offer a "drop" in beavertail grip safety. maybe others can direct you to kings' website.

good luck with it, and don't forget to post your range report!




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Nothing like the smell of Breakfree to make my day complete.
 

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Johnnyknoxville

I agree with Bolantej, your pistol shoting left could be shooter induced. So before you adjust the sights, Colt is pretty good at getting them in the correct location, shoot your pistol some more. Just be sure to place the pad of your finger tip on the trigger and use a short, smooth stroke when pulling the trigger, and be sure to pull straight back. Usually there is a little take up, meaning the trigger moves fairly freely then there is more resistance before the hammer falls. The free travel is the take up.

I also agree with the suggestion to dry fire your pistol. Do this often. Pick a spot on the wall, place the front sight there and watch the front sight while you are dry firing. I the sight moves you are jerking the trigger. Remember a 1911 has a shorter trigger travel, and requires less force to pull than most other pistols, so some tuning of your technique will be needed. A good practice technique is to place a quarter on top of the slide. When you can dry fire consistantly without the quarter falling off your trigger control is getting good. If your pistol contiunes to shoot to the left the drift the rear sight to the right.

Before you replace your front sight, I suggest you paint it first. The reason for this is Colt uses a staked on front sight so a replacement is generally a task for a gunsmith. For paint many better equipped gun stores will carry high visibility paints intended for firearms. Select a color you feel is easy to see and paint the rear surface of the sight. Though most paints will not stick to oily surfaces so you will need to clean the sight realy well. I suggest using a good gun cleaning solvent (Hoppes #9 Semi-auto is good) and following that with paint thinner, or acetone (fingernail polish remover), and alcohol. This will give you a clean and oil free surfce to paint. If you can't find the paints I mentioned at your local gunstores, model airplane paint will work. Just apply the paint in thin layers, and let each layer dry before adding another.

Concerning the magazines. I agree that Wilsons are probably the best. I prefer 7 round magazines, since they are easier to get to seat properly than 8 rounders are in my pistols. Colt and Chip McCormick magazines are very good, and so are Metalform. Stainless Mec-Gar magazines are good, but the blue ones are not up to the same standard in my opinion.

For a grip safety, the Wilson and Kings are good. I have also used an Ed Brown which is very good. Though when ordering you need to be careful. For a while there were different frame configurations from Colt. The 1991 used to have the same configuration as the Series 70 which had longer tangs out the back. The few new 1991 pistols I have seen now use the same frame configuration as the "Enhanced" Colt's did. Wilson makes drop in grip safeties for both configurations, Ed Brown only has one for the longer tangs, I do not know which configuration the Kings safety is. So it will probably be worth your while to buy this part of the rack from a well stocked dealer, or have it installed by a smith.

I hope this helps.


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Str8_Shot

The best handgun for self defense, is the one you have with you.
 

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When I got mine, it was doing the same. Not the shooter's doing; the rear sight was way too far to the left. Drifted it a smidge to the right and bingo. On target. YMMV

Adios Qweeksdraw

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Generally, for firearms links, I use; www.rkba.net

They'll have a link to brownells, kings, wilson's and just about everybody :)
 

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To adjust the rear sight,,,, remember this,,,,Always move the rear sight in the direction you want the bullet to go.
 

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Awesome choice you made! I have a 91A1 also.
I agree to keep practicing before you make any adjustments. Try to shoot from a sandbag rest if at all posible or at least a way you can keep the weapon fully supported. But yes, practice through a few boxes. Maybe you'll need to drift the rear sight a teeny bit. I thought mine shot like crap when I first bought it, but that turned out to be me. Over time my groups shot better and better.

Yes, there are great drop in beavertails safeties. Wilson's sounds good. I have one and can vouch for the quality.

Better sights? If you ever replace the front sight, try to go with the dovetail style. I'm having that done on mine along with a Novak rear sight (Low mount). But do that later
Enjoy you 45 for a while. I'm paying about 150.00 to have the sight work done.

Magazines: I use the original Colt mag and it's fine. I bought 2 Wilson Stainless 7 rounders and they are great. No problems. I only replaced the the bottom pads with thin ones. I've never used Wilson's 8 rounders but I'm sure they're fine. I just like 7 rounders. 7 is enough for me!

I also bought cheap 7 round mags (generic style) at a gunshow for about 6 dollars each, and they are fine too- Although I only use them at the range. But I never had problems with them either.

David
1991A-1 Commander (1994 vintage)
 

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johnnyknoxville, welcome to the 1911 forum! As I recall, the windage on my '91A1 was off just a touch at 25 yards. A gunsmith friend reminded me of something I knew but didn't remember. By knowing the distance to the target, the number of inches you are off, and the distance between the front and rear sights, you can calculate the exact amount you'll need to drift the rear sight, should it need adjustment. We did it, drifted by that amount, and she's right on.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
A big "thanks" to everyone that posted. Your comments have been extremely helpful.

1.) Upon dryfiring the pistol, I found that I was anticipating my own trigger pull and slightly jerking/pushing the pistol forward. I am very leery of dryfiring any firearm but this has been helpful.

2.) Upon closer inspection of the the rear sight, it is seated more to the left. Is moving the rear sight something that needs to be handled by a gunsmith?

Thanks again
 

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1) a 1911 was made to be unharmed while dry firing. just make sure that it's UNLOADED of course.
2)it can be drifted by yourself with a brass punch and a hammer, or if you are unsure of yourself, and afraid to screw it up, just drop it by a smith and they can probably do it in two minutes flat. good luck and be safe.

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Also, if you bring it to a gunrange that has a 'smith on the premises, and buy a box or 2 of ammo, you can fire a few rounds before and after the adjustment, to verify the results. Might as well have fun while the adjustment work is done.

david
91A-1 cdr
 

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If dryfiring is a problem then most IPSC/IDPA shooters are in BIG trouble. Dryfiring the only way to develop the trigger stroke needed for fast shooting. It's also the only way to get a fast draw, reload, ect. My old Para was probably dryfired several hundred thousand times, and it's still ticking. I know of professional shooter's guns that have probabbly been dryfired millons of times. Same guns that often have over 100k rounds on them. No ill effects. So go ahead and dryfie every night. I think you'll find yourself a better shooter from it.
 
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