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This may not belong in here, but since it's clearly marked "Springfield Armory" on the slide, I figured I would start here.

I was in the local gun shop today and noticed this oddity sitting in the gun case. It's a gun they brought in on trade. Check these markings out.



Not so strange, right? Now look at the left side.



Sorry for the camera angle, it's a phone pic and I had to move around to reduce the glare from the lights.

The markings on the gun suggest it's a war production 1911. It has the US Army eagle on the slide along with an ordnance bomb. The markings include "Property of US Gov". The only manufacturer name I can see is the large "Springfield Armory" on the left side of the slide. The frame doesn't have a makers name on it, only the property of US Gov and a serial number. Given the style of the script on the serial number I would say this gun is old school...

What's odd is that it has a Colt patent date on the left side.

The gun appears to have been nickel plated. I say nickel and not chrome because there is a little flaking on the ride side of the frame up by the rails.

Does anyone have any idea what the story on this gun is?
 

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When the Colt M1911 pistol was adopted, part of the deal was that the government could manufacture, in its own armories, one pistol for every two it bought from Colt (the ratio is from memory, and I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong). In the years between 1912 and when we got involved in WWI, Springfield Armory made M1911 pistols. The demand for M1903 rifles was such that Springfield stopped making the pistols, to devote their full capacity to making rifles. We are talking the U.S. Government arsenal in Springfield, MA, not the Illinois company that bought the name after the armory closed in 1968.
I think the frame on that pistol is Colt, since the location of the U.S. property stamp indicates 1918 manufacture, and Springfield didn't make any pistols that late.
 

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SA markings

The government specs were such that all the parts were drop-in which allowed military armorors to mix and match slides safties barrels and all internals without fitting.

It was a common practice for colt frames to end up with SA, Remmington and others because that is what the armoror had. Some armorors had the habbit of taking new shipments in cosmoline -- say 10 to 20 weapons and stripping them all at once to clean the cosmo off. Shipments may have been of mixed breeding creating weapons that were true mutts-- no particular parentage but friendly and loyal to the owners and viscious to the bad guys

Dangerous
 

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$629 seems a bit much. The money would be much better spent on a nice, used M1991A1.
 
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