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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, I am new to this forum and happy to be here.
Just installed a new WC Slide Release on my new Springfield 1911 Defender. It seemed to install just fine. The slide racked just fine the first time then upon trying to rack it the second time it locked up. I could not pull the slide back. So I disassembled it, put the original slide release back in and it worked fine. I thought it might be a fluke so I reinstalled the WC Slide Release again and the same thing happened. Upon inspection it seemed to fit through the link just fine with proper dimensions. Anyone know what is going on? Wilson says on their website that it is supposed to be a drop in part.
Thank you.
 

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What's the shaft diameter on each of the slide stops. It sounds like the diameter on the WC may be slightly larger and binding on the barrel lug.
 

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I had one recently that would not fit fully flush in the frame which caused it to not engage the slide properly. A little work on the back side with a file solved it. The offset was so slight you really had to look close to see it.
 

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Wilson says on their website that it is supposed to be a drop in part.
Thank you.
New WC slide stop pin diameter sounds just a touch too large for your 1911. As Reloader said, larger pin is likely binding on the lower barrel lugs. Put some marker on the new slide stop pin, install and confirm.
Drop in means it may not need much fitting. Yes, yes I know it says 'drop in' but that is not usually the case.
Look at it this way, you will achieve a much better, correct fit if the part does require a bit of fitting. Read up on fitting because there may be more fitting required.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hello all, I called WC and they said it may need some fitting and to call back Monday because the guy to talk to is out today. I asked if this was something I could easily do myself and he said yes. To dadjoker who asked why I was replacing this all I can say is I guess I figured a forging would be better, but having read all the discussion about MIM vs forging I guess MIMs can be and are as strong. I thought I would drop in the WC Bullet Proof Slide Release and be done with it. However, grinding on such a critical part is not what I had in mind. I'll wait and see what the guy says Monday and then probably just send it back and use the OEM part
Thanks for the feedback
 

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On most 1911 style guns, if you replace the slide stop, first measure the diameter of the old slide stop, then the new WC slide stop.....For the most precise measurement, a one inch micrometer will give you the exact measurement. Most likely the WC shaft is a larger diameter, and if so, it will bind on the lower lug/feet of the barrel. You could mark the top of the slide stop pin shaft, with Dykem or a black Sharpie pen, then find the best way to hold the slide stop securely, and flat file the top of the shaft. Take your time, mark the shaft repeatedly, and test the fit often, until you find the new WC slide stop supports the lower lug and does not bind which will allow the slide to operate properly. It is not uncommon to file the top of the shaft to allow more clearance, and if the gun is used in high volume shooting, if the slide stop seems a bit loose, you could order a slide stop with the correct diameter or use your old slide stop. For example, Evolution Gun Works (EGW) makes slide stops with the standard .200" shaft, and an oversize .203" shaft.....and may be ordered through Brownells.
 

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Grinding "on it" would be a serious exaggeration. Get some 600 and 800 grit sandpaper (or even a Scotchbrite in those grits) and just twirl the slide-release between your fingers as you are just looking to take a few hundreds off (if that), re-check often until the slide racks with ease
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
On most 1911 style guns, if you replace the slide stop, first measure the diameter of the old slide stop, then the new WC slide stop.....For the most precise measurement, a one inch micrometer will give you the exact measurement. Most likely the WC shaft is a larger diameter, and if so, it will bind on the lower lug/feet of the barrel. You could mark the top of the slide stop pin shaft, with Dykem or a black Sharpie pen, then find the best way to hold the slide stop securely, and flat file the top of the shaft. Take your time, mark the shaft repeatedly, and test the fit often, until you find the new WC slide stop supports the lower lug and does not bind which will allow the slide to operate properly. It is not uncommon to file the top of the shaft to allow more clearance, and if the gun is used in high volume shooting, if the slide stop seems a bit loose, you could order a slide stop with the correct diameter or use your old slide stop. For example, Evolution Gun Works (EGW) makes slide stops with the standard .200" shaft, and an oversize .203" shaft.....and may be ordered through Brownells.
I am not able to picture that in my mind. The locking lugs are on the opposite side of the barrel. How can the pin interfere with them. Also Before I installed the WC release ( I am calling it a release because that's what WC calls it) (I am also aware of the silly arguments about whether to call it a release or stop) I compared the WC pin with the SA pin and the WC pin was indeed greater in diameter but still had a lot of "slop" if you will.
Thank you for your reply.
 

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The bottom barrel lug ride on the slide stop pin to push the barrel into the upper (locking) lugs. The link serves only to pull the barrel out of lock-up.

The bottom lug must be fit to the slide stop pin for proper function.
 

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If one were going to fit the slide stop pin to the lower barrel lugs it would be best to only remove material in the top center section of the shaft where the lower barrel lugs contact the shaft. Clearance a path a little bit wider than the lower lugs to ensure that no potential "wobble" gets it off track during firing. That leaves the ends larger to better fit the frame holes. I've done that using a small narrow smooth cut file, wrapped in sand paper or a sanding stick, finishing with a stone. It is tedious work if done with the care required to do a good job, but the few times I've done it my results have been more than satisfactory.
 

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As I mentioned in post #7, and as BBBBill mentioned in post #13, if you do decide to remove metal from the WC slide stop pin, you only mark the top of the shaft of the slide stop pin with Dykem or a black Sharpie, and flat file the top of the shaft. Check you work often, make sure the file is held level, and continue to check your work as you remove metal until you get the proper fit of the slide stop pin shaft to support the lower lug of the barrel without binding.......
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
To answer a previous question. No, it is not an extended slide release. And it is not hitting the grip. I am going to use the original slide release from Springfield. I am not brave enough to grind or sand on my pistol parts. I do have some mechanical and technical background and I know that parts are made with special metallurgical and dimensional specifications as well as specific surface coatings. Even if it's done all the time by people, I am going to leave it alone. The OEM part works just fine.
 

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You've used the word grind, twice now. You've made the right decision to leave alone. However.... if you want to learn reread what a couple of very knowledgeable people have said to do to fix your issue. They are explaining how to correctly fit a part that at this point is extra. If you mess it up put the original back in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You've used the word grind, twice now. You've made the right decision to leave alone. However.... if you want to learn reread what a couple of very knowledgeable people have said to do to fix your issue. They are explaining how to correctly fit a part that at this point is extra. If you mess it up put the original back in.
I mentioned "grinding" only because someone previously mentioned it. I did read the comments about "removing" metal correctly from the part. I just don't think that after doing that that I would be confident of the part no matter how correctly I thought I had done it. I did learn a lot from this post. Thank you all.
 
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