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My experience has chiefly been in using RCBS and Redding dies. I have a couple older C&H and a few Lee dies. I just worked up some new .44 Magnum Starline cases and ran them through my RCBS sizer die. Since they were unused and unstained I could easily see how far down the case the carbide sizing ring went. It appears to stop a good 1/4" to 3/8" above the rim. I've loaded 1,000s of rounds and this has never been an issue, and it isn't now. What I curious about is; does any company make carbide sizing dies that go further down the case in rimmed cases?

I suspect this area of the case does not expand as much as the top 2/3rds does and therefor doesn't need resized. I could be wrong. Anyone want to chip in?

Grumpy
 

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Rollsizer! But if you are working with a normal sized budget- you need another option! :LOL:

You can modify the die a bit by sanding down the base to allow it to go further down the brass (credit Tom Freeman for that nugget). I understand some dies go further but most [carbide dies] stop similarly short. Any of us that have had issues in the past (usually from unknown pick ups or purchased range brass) have a bulge buster for occasional use.
 

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Mostly the lower part of the case is not sized due to the bevel they put on the carbide ring to guide the case in the die, I have punched the carbide rings out and flip them over to increase the sizing down the lower part of the case, but it made it tougher to line up the cases with the die in the sizing step, especially with progressive press.
 

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I've noticed that sizing new Starline brass with my Dillon carbide sizing dies it seems to take them down a little and leave a line.
I have a Rollsizer for 38/357 & 44 but to be honest the way I load them I don't really get enough bulge to worry about much less cause functional problems. But still it doesn't make them look like new like some of the other calibers.
 

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The RCBS carbide sizer dies that I have, recommend leaving the thickness of a nickel, between the shellholder and the bottom of the die. This is supposed to leave the displaced brass somewhere to go. I have never found displaced brass to be an issue anyway. I usually just crank the die down as far as it will go.

Also, the theory behind this recommendation, is the brass nearest the case head is the thickest, and doesn't hardly expand at all, if any, with sane loadings, so sizing there is not necessiary.
 

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I too set the sizing die closer than the nickel thickness but am cautious not to let the die contact the shell holder. Hard contact can crack the brittle carbide ring.
 

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Not saying it can't happen, but I just haven't seen anyone post complaints about cracking their carbide sizing rings... is this really a problem that folks are having?
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Not saying it can't happen, but I just haven't seen anyone post complaints about cracking their carbide sizing rings... is this really a problem that folks are having?
I've always set my sizer to touch the shell holder with a wee bit of breakover at the end. None of my carbide rings have cracked or broken. I'm not saying it can not happen, I'm saying it hasn't happened to me in 30+ years of loading. To be correct I should say it hasn't happened yet, it could or it might never happen. However if it would happen I'd just call the manufacturer and order a replacement die. I've got my money's worth out of these. :)

Grumpy
 
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Some people out there can manage to break an anvil. Just sayin... :rolleyes:

609257
 

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I use Lee carbide 45 dies screwed down to touch per Lee's setup instructions, I ran several new Extreme brass thru the sizing die and have the same bright ring at the bottom of the case. Just ahead of the web, according to all I have read in the past indicates this part of the brass is thicker and doesn't expand under normal pressure. therefore doesn't need to be resized.

Case head expansion as measured at this location is a pressure sign in bottleneck rifle cartridges following multiple firings. More is written on this subject than I care to type. Someone correct me if I am wrong on this.

Doug
 

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You measure expansion at that point as an indicator of incipient case head separation in bottleneck cartridges. Loose primer pockets may not be the first sign of this high overpressure We are talking magnum large rifle primers and high pressure loading.
I am unsure about the .357 sig, no experience personally, bottleneck cartridge, high pressure but it headspaces on the cartridge mouth...not the shoulder.
 

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I am unsure about the .357 sig, no experience personally, bottleneck cartridge, high pressure but it headspaces on the cartridge mouth...not the shoulder.
I played with the 357 Sig for a while. Fun caliber, but noisy with lots of muzzle flash. It also turned out to be temperamental. Haven't loaded it in a few years. If I wanted to push a 9mm bullet fast, there was always the 38 Super, 9x23 or 9x25.

Initially I set up my dies to headspace off the mouth like SAAMI and CIP say. That worked fine until a pice of different headstamp brass snuck in the mix.

Then I just set my dies up to bump the shoulder about 3 thou and then all was better.

Kinda like the 300 Whisper/Blackout. There isnt much of a shoulder, but it is there. Use it.
 

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I played with the 357 Sig for a while. Fun caliber, but noisy with lots of muzzle flash. It also turned out to be temperamental. Haven't loaded it in a few years. If I wanted to push a 9mm bullet fast, there was always the 38 Super, 9x23 or 9x25.

Initially I set up my dies to headspace off the mouth like SAAMI and CIP say. That worked fine until a pice of different headstamp brass snuck in the mix.

Then I just set my dies up to bump the shoulder about 3 thou and then all was better.

Kinda like the 300 Whisper/Blackout. There isnt much of a shoulder, but it is there. Use it.
I wondered about the Sig when I first was around one. Kinda like bumping the shoulder on a belted mag. Yes loud and a lot of muzzle flash. I had a range friend years ago that used one when it first came out. I had a pair of Glock 23s back then, a good friend let me use his WC and Ed Brown Govt. models in multiple training scenarios. Ruined me for anything but 1911s real quickly. Now I am building another Glock, a 19 with a Wilson Combat barrel and GGP slide etc. Just for fun .
If this component shortage ever repairs itself, I am going to explore a 38 Super.
 

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Lee and Hornady go down the furthest. The "chamfer" on the carbide ring, to ease the case entering the die, and the shell holder control how far down the die can size.
I have an original RCBS carbide die from the '70s that has the barest chamfer just to "break" the sharp edge. I had to jiggle almost every case to enter the die.
 

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The first pistol die set I purchased was a Lyman carbide set for 38spl/357mag.
The instructions for the carbide sizer says to keep the sizer off the shell holder to keep from cracking the carbide ring.
I disliked the coke bottle appearance of the finished cartridge case that I purchased a 357 mag Redding Dual Ring carbide sizer, it makes cartridges that look proper.
The down side is Redding recommends the cases be lubed for sizing.
I’ve used the die with lubed and un-lubed cases and lube cases are so much easier to size with.

Subsequent die purchases for 45 Colt and 45 Automatic die sets have been for old fashioned steel die sets. I like the steel sizer dies much better.

Both the single ring and dual ring carbide and my steel sizing dies leave the thicker web portion the case head un-touch by the die.
I believe cartridge case manufacturers make the case head and web areas small enough so their cases will fit into the smallest SAAMI chamber and sizing dies are just not made to the the same tight specification.
 
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