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I've never carried a cocked and locked 1911/A1 pistol. I have carried a Glock for years and am completely familier with basic gun safety. I am not familier at all with the nuances and methods of properly carrying a cocked and locked 1911/A1 pistol. I'am sure theres a few things NOT to do and maybe I should start there. Whats the big things to remember when carrying a C&L'd 1911/A1? I understand it was designed to be carried that way and is completely safe when done correctly. Thanks
 

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I recommend a good holster. I prefer something that securely holds your gun and covers the trigger.I do not think there are any special preautions to take.Treat it like you treat any firearm you carry. I assume you are going to become very familiar with the gun before you start carrying it.
 

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If you are already accustomed to a Glock you are already familiar with Rule #1:

Keep your #$%@ finger off the #$%@ trigger until the #$%@ sights are on the #$%@ target!

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D. Kamm
USGI M1911/M1911A1 Pistols Website
http://usgi1911.tripod.com
 

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I've carried a cocked & locked 5" government model for about three years, now. I prefer a holster that not only covers the trigger guard, but covers the thumb safety as well, so as to lessen the chance of body movements wiping it off.

The Wilson Featherweight IWB is a good one, and I've used mine a lot. The Wilson Summer Companion should also be a good IWB holster when measured by that criteria.

My favorite carry holster is an Old World Leather IWB Clip holster, made of real thin leather with no reinforcing around the mouth. Can't use it during matches (too hard to reholster), but it's a great carry holster and covers both trigger guard and thumb saftey.

I'm a firm believer in lots of carry practice around the house before going out on the street, to make sure the chosen system is going to be safe and not cause public embarassment. (In Michigan, we can lose our permit if Joe Citizen sees a gun "print" and feels threatened.)

Another important consideration is to get lots of experience actually using your 1911. I competed with a Glock for quite awhile, and when I went back to my 1911, it took several matches before I was consistently wiping of the safety during a draw. Forgetting to do that during a confrontation could ruin your whole day.

Regards
Bob Hunt
 

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Greetings Bob, Although I have been shooting for just shy of 30 years, I defer to your experience in carrying (I'm still waiting for my license) and competitive shooting. Could you please explain the basis of your statement regarding the risk of losing one's permit if someone sees the gun's print and "feels threatened." I plan on carrying my S70 gov't model, probably IWB, and appreciate any guidance you can share.
Thanks, RSS
 

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RS2,

Although I wouldn't presume to speak for Bob Hunt, in many states if someone can see the weapon, then it ain't concealed! If it ain't concealed, then you're in violation of the law by semi-open carry. Disturbing the peace can also enter into it. Inadvertant display of a weapon (printing) may also be considered a form of 'brandishing" in some locales.
 

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Just be sure the holster you use is A) good quality B) Made for the 1911 and C) It does not accidentally swipe the safety off. Roll around on the floor (bed couch) or some such to be sure the safety stays on.

One other thing, some competitors adjust the safety to swipe on or off very easily. I like a noticeable snick (for lack of a better word) both on and off. I shot a Les Bear some time ago that was set up for a cop. It took two men and a boy to get it back on safety. The reason (as explained to me, anyway) was to prevent the piece from going into safety at an inopportune time
 

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Originally posted by RS2:
regarding the risk of losing one's permit if someone sees the gun's print and "feels threatened."
You don't lose your permit for "printing". In states that allow open carry, displaying your weapon in a non-threatening manner is OK. In areas where open carry is forbidden or in states specifically limiting CCW holders, not making a good attempt to conceal your weapon could get you in trouble.

Regarding printing: The only people who will "make" you are cops and other CCW holders. Everyday anti-gun nuts wouldn't pay any attention to a bulge - especially today when folks routinely carry cell phones/pagers on their hip.

I carried for two years before my kids "made" me.

The only obvious "gun" carry method is the heavy black leather fanny pack.



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Have a great day!
 

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blacklab - I believe the most important thing, as with any other gun, would be complete familiarity with the weapon. Know how to do what you want to do with it. Know what, why, and how the gun does what it does. C&L is as safe as it gets when referring to items that have a certain amount of inherent danger.
 

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Originally posted by blacklab:
I've never carried a cocked and locked 1911/A1 pistol. I have carried a Glock for years and am completely familier with basic gun safety. I am not familier at all with the nuances and methods of properly carrying a cocked and locked 1911/A1 pistol. I'am sure theres a few things NOT to do and maybe I should start there. Whats the big things to remember when carrying a C&L'd 1911/A1? I understand it was designed to be carried that way and is completely safe when done correctly. Thanks
Everything these guys told you is right, so I'll run through the basic procedure.

1-Load the weapon. The best way to do this is to chamber a round, apply the safety, holster the weapon, snap it in if holster has a snap. Then, remove the magazine, top it off, and seat it positively in the weapon. All this, of course, is done while observing rule #1. Then, don't mess with it! The weapon stays where it is until it's needed or unloaded. If needed, I like my students to try to always re-holster a fully loaded weapon, never an empty one.

2- I like IWB holsters, so quite often at the end of a day, the holster comes off my belt with the weapon secured, and they are stored together, still in Condition 1. Paddles work well, too. No matter what, always keep your finger off the trigger, and if the thumb safety(s) are exposed, make sure they remain engaged. I don't like press checks...if you're so stupid that you can't remember whether you loaded the weapon, take up some other method.

3-If or when you need to download the weapon, simply remove it from the holster, point it in a safe direction and keeping your finger off the trigger, remove the magazine, then disengage the safety and clear the chamber, double-checking visually. There is never any need to lower the hammer on a live round, and people who do that scare the hell out of me.

The Condition 1 weapon is, in my opinion, much safer than a Glock to carry and reholster. You must pay attention to all the basic common sense safety rules, keep your equipment clean and properly adjusted, use good holsters, and handle it sensibly at all times. So what's different about Cocked and Locked?
 

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It certainly is essential to be safe with a gun, BUT, topping the magazine off and inserting it while the gun remains holstered is DUMB!!! A great recipe for a failure to feed! To scare hell out of everyone, there's Ed McGivern's opinion that a positive, sure grip can only be consistent by touching the trigger with your finger AS YOU FIRST GRIP THE GUN. As usual, Ed knew what he was talking about!
 

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Originally posted by Doug 29:
topping the magazine off and inserting it while the gun remains holstered is DUMB!!! A great recipe for a failure to feed!

To scare hell out of everyone, there's Ed McGivern's opinion that a positive, sure grip can only be consistent by touching the trigger with your finger AS YOU FIRST GRIP THE GUN. As usual, Ed knew what he was talking about!
How does inserting a magazine in the holster any more likely to cause a failure to feed than inserting a magazine in any other situation??

If Ed said that, then I would say it was he that was DUMB. Anyone who practices properly drawing the pistol from a holster(as everyone should) can tell you that you will learn through repetition to get the proper grip on the gun before you begin drawing it from the holster. If you haven't begun drawing it from the holster, then there is no way you are getting your finger on the trigger unless you have the wrong holster.
 

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Nothing wrong with carrying hammer down on an empty chamber- pretty slim chance you won't have 2 seconds to chamber one
 

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>Nothing wrong with carrying hammer down on >an empty chamber- pretty slim chance you >won't have 2 seconds to chamber one

I basically agree, but Condition Three will prove to be a *little* tricky if your weak hand is unavailable at the time you need to draw.

DQ
 

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Originally posted by Doug 29:
It certainly is essential to be safe with a gun, BUT, topping the magazine off and inserting it while the gun remains holstered is DUMB!!! A great recipe for a failure to feed! To scare hell out of everyone, there's Ed McGivern's opinion that a positive, sure grip can only be consistent by touching the trigger with your finger AS YOU FIRST GRIP THE GUN. As usual, Ed knew what he was talking about!
Since I never heard Ed referred to as 'Stubby' or 'Gimpy', and if he actually said that, he was #1-Very lucky, #2-Very stupid. The reason I prefer to top off and insert the magazine in a Condition 1 gun is because it eliminates touching the trigger (in a properly designed holster), and totally eliminates handling the weapon. As far as setting up a FTF, one should know the weapon system well enough to avoid that. Not to know and understand the system before using it is REALLY DUMB!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Originally posted by shooter452:
Everything these guys told you is right, so I'll run through the basic procedure.

1-Load the weapon. The best way to do this is to chamber a round, apply the safety, holster the weapon, snap it in if holster has a snap. Then, remove the magazine, top it off, and seat it positively in the weapon. All this, of course, is done while observing rule #1. Then, don't mess with it! The weapon stays where it is until it's needed or unloaded. If needed, I like my students to try to always re-holster a fully loaded weapon, never an empty one.

2- I like IWB holsters, so quite often at the end of a day, the holster comes off my belt with the weapon secured, and they are stored together, still in Condition 1. Paddles work well, too. No matter what, always keep your finger off the trigger, and if the thumb safety(s) are exposed, make sure they remain engaged. I don't like press checks...if you're so stupid that you can't remember whether you loaded the weapon, take up some other method.

3-If or when you need to download the weapon, simply remove it from the holster, point it in a safe direction and keeping your finger off the trigger, remove the magazine, then disengage the safety and clear the chamber, double-checking visually. There is never any need to lower the hammer on a live round, and people who do that scare the hell out of me.

The Condition 1 weapon is, in my opinion, much safer than a Glock to carry and reholster. You must pay attention to all the basic common sense safety rules, keep your equipment clean and properly adjusted, use good holsters, and handle it sensibly at all times. So what's different about Cocked and Locked?
Thanks Shooter452, thats what I was looking for; how to properly and safely carry a 1911/A1 pistol and in what condition. Seems like its like dsk said, its similar to the Glock in that the big thing is keeping your finger off the trigger. With the Glock thats pretty much it. I'am not used to the actions of engaging the grip safety and thumb safety. Just trying to learn the right way from you guys. Thanks.
 

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This is a reply to an earlier question about Michigan CCW Law:

"Brandishing" your pistol in Michigan "can" result in loss of your permit. Current legal opinion in Michigan, WHERE NO OPEN CARRY OR DISPLAY IS PERMITTED, EXCEPT ON YOUR OWN PRIVATE PROPERTY, is that if the gun is accidentally exposed in anyway, this constitutes "brandishing".

Source: the qualified LEO who teaches the legal portion of our club's Personal Protection in the Home course, which is accepted for the CCW license.
 
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