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Discussion Starter #1
I am a newbie to casting bullets. I am casting a 230 full wadcutter .357 bullet with a 6 cavity mold. After I get the mold warmed up the bullets are great, until they start sticking when the mold gets hot, I assume? The bullets also get the frosted appearance at this time. I assume that it is due to the mold being too hot. Do I need to remelt these bullets? Or will they work. They are only being pushed around 920 fps. I am using a RCBS 20lb pot, and warming the lead to where it will flow. I tried turning the heat down but it wont flow. I just get it warm enough to flow. If I have diagnosed the problem, any suggestions to keep the mold cool. I only get about 200 bullets thrown when it gets too hot. Thanks for any help. I have saved myself a bundle doing this, but would like to do it right. (got a buddy that has a auto luber/sizer) Regards, DC

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[I am casting a 230 full wadcutter .357 bullet with a 6 cavity mold.]

Well, I'm not sure what you mean by "230 full wadcutter .357 bullet".... standard weight bullet for a wadcutter .357 is 148-grains weight...

But to your question.... frosted bullets are useable.... so I wouldn't re-melt them. Your mould is too hot... I recommend casting with two moulds, as follows:

Step 1. Fill Mould A -- set it down to cool.

Step 2. Fill Mould B -- set it down to cool.

Step 3. Pick-up Mould A & break the sprue -- dump the bullets. Re-fill Mould A -- set it down to cool.

Step 4. Pick-up Mould B & break the sprue -- dump the bullets. Re-fill Mould B -- set it down to cool.

Step 5. Go to Step 3; repeat.

This will optimize your casting cycle, and keep your moulds cooler. I do this two-mould routine using different caliber bullet moulds, so I can cast an assortment of bullets at one session.

If you have only the one mould, you will have to slow down and let your mould cool, or shoot 'frosty' bullets. (Better to buy another mould). --CC
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It is indeed 230grain full wadcutter, for bowling pins.
The mold was a bit pricy, so I will just case some other bullets at the same time. Thanks for the reply, DC

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What brand of mold is it? If you have a Lee mold, it must be used hot to cast well filled bullets.

To ease the problem of sticky bullets in the mold, use some Midway mold release. It is a moly-type spray; a light coat of that in a cold mold will help.

Also, I've got to ask, too: Are you firing a .357 or a .45? A 230 grain wadcutter would take up almost ALL of the space inside a .357 case, let alone a .38.

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Frosted bullets are no problem.

Follow the Lee instructions for cooling the mould and in seconds you will be casting "pretty" bullets again. I use a damp towl and place the FILLED mould on it for a few seconds at most.

Multiple moulds, as has already been suggested, will also do the trick. The nice thing about using 2 moulds is the spures tend to cool really well for perfect bases.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the info, guys. Yes, it is a 230gr full wadcutter in a 38sp. case. It is the single best bullet/caliber configuration in revolvers for bowling pins based on muzzle flip, sight recovery, etc. I know it sounds weird, but it works. Have a good one, DC

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Discussion Starter #8
We run the bullets right around 900-950fps, giving us our 195+ power factor for pins. Jerry Miculek used to run 200gr bullets @1000+ at second chance, and other guys experimenting came up with the 230full wadcutter design. Guys that shot every Second Chance thought it was the stuff! I agree, and the top revo shooters shooting pins all use some variation of the bullet weight. Regards, DC

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Shooting 230-grain .357 bullets must be a lot like shooting broom handles.


That's an interesting load, pingun. A bullet weighing the "standard" weight of a .45 caliber bullet, travelling faster than the "standard" velocity of a .45 slug, all out of a .38 revolver. Amazing. It would make a good self-defense load, too, I would imagine.

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