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Discussion Starter #1
Hi again, My Loadmaster came in and I also got the Book Modern Reloading by: Richard Lee

While looking at load data I do not see anything about swc, all I see is cast or jacketed. Am I correct to assume all lead bullets load the same, and all jacketed bullets load the same?, wether or not they are rn, swc, ect.?

BTW I'm off to the big gun show in Lakeland FL tomorrow, they have it every year at this time. I'll be looking for some supplies <grin>

Thanks

Thanks
Tom
 

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The weight of the Bullets will make a difference in the load data. If you Check most of the powder manf's. load data on their respective sites they reference load data by Jacketed, Lead, and Bullet type FMC,SWC,RN. Here's a link the allient site so you can see the difference http://recipes.alliantpowder.com/
 

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Originally posted by bowhunter:
The weight of the Bullets will make a difference in the load data. If you Check most of the powder manf's. load data on their respective sites they reference load data by Jacketed, Lead, and Bullet type FMC,SWC,RN. Here's a link the allient site so you can see the difference http://recipes.alliantpowder.com/
oops maybe I should have clarified that better, I see the dfferences in the weights of bullets, say a 200gn SWC and a 200gn rn, would they load use the same amount of powder?, this book does not show differences between swc, rn, fp, ect, it only shows a difference between lead or jacketed in each gn bullet

Thanks again
Tom
 

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Not all bullet _SHAPES_ of the same _WEIGHT_ can be safely interchanged...

For example: look at the Speer manual... the gold-dot HP bullet has significantly different powder-charge / pressure limits than Speer's comparable jacketed RN or TC bullets of the same weight.

Bullet design & shape variables are perhaps more critical in maximum rifle loads, where certain 'premium' bullet designs require lower powder charges, which may, or may not, result in lower velocity.

For handgun loads, the critical factor is "USEABLE REMAINING CASE VOLUME" once a bullet is seated. In simple terms, the deeper you seat a bullet into a cartridge case, the less volume remains for the powder to combust... as volume is reduced, pressure INCREASES in a non-linear and un-predictable manner.

Hence, some loading manuals list overall length of the finish cartridge for each specific bullet. This is an important dimension -- not just for the completed cartridge to fit a revolver chamber or semi-auto pistol magazine, but to keep pressure at a safe level.

So, back to your question: even with cast bullets, if you change bullet shape, you also MAY need to change bullet seating depth... which also may change remaining USEABLE COMBUSTION CHAMBER (case) VOLUME, which also may substantially increase PRESSURES.

WHEW -- It is 'internal ballistics' or, physics and chemistry at work. --CC
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Originally posted by Capt_C:
Not all bullet _SHAPES_ of the same _WEIGHT_ can be safely interchanged...

For example: look at the Speer manual... the gold-dot HP bullet has significantly different powder-charge / pressure limits than Speer's comparable jacketed RN or TC bullets of the same weight.

Bullet design & shape variables are perhaps more critical in maximum rifle loads, where certain 'premium' bullet designs require lower powder charges, which may, or may not, result in lower velocity.

For handgun loads, the critical factor is "USEABLE REMAINING CASE VOLUME" once a bullet is seated. In simple terms, the deeper you seat a bullet into a cartridge case, the less volume remains for the powder to combust... as volume is reduced, pressure INCREASES in a non-linear and un-predictable manner.

Hence, some loading manuals list overall length of the finish cartridge for each specific bullet. This is an important dimension -- not just for the completed cartridge to fit a revolver chamber or semi-auto pistol magazine, but to keep pressure at a safe level.

So, back to your question: even with cast bullets, if you change bullet shape, you also MAY need to change bullet seating depth... which also may change remaining USEABLE COMBUSTION CHAMBER (case) VOLUME, which also may substantially increase PRESSURES.

WHEW -- It is 'internal ballistics' or, physics and chemistry at work. --CC
Thankss, It diudn;t make sense to me that different shapes would take the same charges, I will look for another manual today as well, at least for different charges of different bullet shapes,

Tom
 
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