1911Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Started to charge about 220 45 ACP cases with 5.3 gr of powder. Plugged in my RCBS powder scale and started my Lyman powder measure. Calibrated the scale. After about 50 cases charged, I noticed that when I removed the powder weight holder (the doo dad that you put the powder in to weigh it -- I can't remember what it is called) the scale read 1.4 grains instead of zero. I rezeroed the scale and checked the weight of the last charge, 4.1 grains instead of 5.3. I had forgotten to WARM UP THE SCALE FOR ABOUT 20 MINUTES BEFORE USE. Had to dump 50+ charges and start over. My goof.

Lessons relearned:

1) Always warm up the scale.

2) When something smells rotten, STOP, check, and fix it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
This is where beam scales come in handy, as a good double-check safety net. While cumbersome to use to determine exact weights of a pre-measured charge, they can at least tell you if you are close when you set the scale to an expected weight.

A beam scale is something that should always be available.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,572 Posts
I just leave my scale plugged in and turned off. It seems to stay "warm" that way. It rarely drifts unless the AC kicks on. Mine is one of the RCBS ones but I forget the model number. Also, ALWAYS check it with the check weights!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
My RCBS scale is the same if I take it out of the box it needs to set on the bench for an hour or so
I mostly leave it out and off but pluged in and its ready to go when I am
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Berkim:

I don't know what you mean by aclimitized, but if I don't warm it up the zero wanders badly. I have a beam scale, which I use for smaller jobs, and checking each scale with weights. I used this one because it's faster than the beam, but you have to warm it up.

Peter:

I never tried leaving it off but plugged in. I will try it and see if it works.

Check weights wouldn't have caught the problem, since it started right and wandered while I was loading. After warm up it is as accurate as it needs to be, I have compared it with my Ohaus 10-10. scale and check weights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
Sorry, I'm a rotten speller... I meant, having the scale get used to the tempeture, so if the garage/shop is 50' and it was at 72', leave it in the shopfor a while to get used to the tempature, so there's no condensation, etc... I've never heard of a scale having to warm up, which I'm taking to be 'leaving it on for 1/2 hour before using",

but... what I don't know could fill a library
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
dodgestdshift said:
Check weights wouldn't have caught the problem, since it started right and wandered while I was loading.
Actually, the check weights can be handy to check for shift. I've seen cases many times where even though the scale returns to zero with an empty powder pan ok, if a check weight is placed on the scale it will read a little short.

I typically turn on my scale a while before I start loading, and just as I start, I'll perform a calibration before each session and use a check weight every so often to check for drift.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top