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Discussion Starter #1
hi all,
how hard is it to switch a gun over from 45 acp to 38 super, 10mm, or 40 s&w? i am about to purchase a kimber custom target (series I) in 45 and would like to change it over to a different caliber for the sake of having something different. is it just a barrel change? or are there mods to the frame that must also be done? anything else i need to know about?
thanks,
kstockfo
 

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Discussion Starter #2
forgot to mention

i am getting a fantastic deal on this gun, so good that i can't turn it down. that's for the people who would say "buy the caliber you want instead of converting from 45acp". i also like the idea of customizing something so it's not factory-stock.
thanks again,
kstockfo
 

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The short answer is: Complete upper assembly - barrel, slide, and small parts, plus a correct ejector which is pinned hard to the frame.
 

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It's tougher than you might expect. Assuming the pistol has a traditional, non-ramped barrel, the feed-ramp geometry is different for each caliber group. Because of this, some problems can pop up. This is a non-issue if the frame is set up for a ramped barrel. You could do a caliber conversion to 400 Corbon. You'd just need a new barrel as everything else could remain the same. It's fun and different but ammo is pricey.
 

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Kimber "pre-Series II" pistols command premium prices. For reasons I don't understand, but there it is.

So assuming this is a (say $800) pistol you can spend another $600 on it and end up with, perhaps, a $600 pistol. Once you bugger -- er, modify -- it you gotta find someone with the exact wants and wishes in the pistol to buy it. All our pistols get sold eventually. Our wifes don't believe it but it happens.

Other than "just 'cuz" (which I understand), none of the calibers you mention have any advantage over .45ACP. Even the original proponent of 10mm, the FBI, has abandoned it. And never really wanted it, but the Army had just convinced Congress that .45ACP was obsolete so the FBI couldn't really ask for it and not look stupid.

If you want to play with this pistol just be aware it's all money down the drain. Can be rewarding from a hobby standpoint, but I'd do this with a pistol less in demand.

Here's an example of spending money to make a pistol worth less:



Glock 19 with the grip angle cut back to as near as M1911-angle as we could get, trigger guard rounded, pistol textured for a good gripping surfact. $450 for the pistol, $90 for the XS 24/7 tritium sights, $160 for the chop job = $700 cost = $300 (maybe) value. ;)

-- Chuck
 

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Murphy's Law as applied to multi-caliber firearms: Any time you want to shoot the gun, it will be set up in a caliber you are not interested in today.

Hey, Chuck, I like the looks of that $300 Glock. Maybe when he gets tired of it, I can try it out. Although I am a blue steel and walnut snob, I know Plastic Works, but my reflexes are tuned to 17 degrees.
 

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Jim Watson said:
The short answer is: Complete upper assembly - barrel, slide, and small parts, plus a correct ejector which is pinned hard to the frame.
And, caliber appropriate magazines.
 
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