1911Forum banner
21 - 40 of 42 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
958 Posts
I would try a very light recoil spring like 8, 9, or 10 pounds. If it returns feeds and returns to battery, I would call it done.

With the stiff recoil spring in, you can push the frame forward with the slide abutting a ledge like a counter top or picnic table (have to position such that the barrel can make it’s excursion through the barrel bushing) and then engage the slide stop to lock the slide open. Now insert the charged magazine. Release the slide stop and you are good to go.


Best wishes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
785 Posts
You know, I didn't ask for all the information; including your age.
I did not come here for a urination confrontation.

I passed 70 a long time ago. I just finished fighting Covid for the past six months.

NOW, can I change one or two springs in the 1911 that will give me a small advance in racking the slide?
Change whatever you want is your gun, you asked, I answered in good spirits, on the same note, I don't care about your age or your covid, can take the barrel of your 1911 and .........not going to get far with your attitude in this forum though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
549 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Change whatever you want is your gun, you asked, I answered in good spirits, on the same note, I don't care about your age or your covid, can take the barrel of your 1911 and .........not going to get far with your attitude in this forum though.
You are not a nice person.

I have not been on this forum for years......... now I know why!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,182 Posts
Hello @Road Rat
If you decide to go with a much lighter recoil spring, you also might want to consider adding a Shok-Buffer to your spring guide to prevent impact damage to your frame. At one point, I had some trouble racking the slide on a couple 1911s. Turned out the problem wasn't grip strength but simple dry skin. Still have trouble opening plastic bags sometimes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
549 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Hello @Road Rat
If you decide to go with a much lighter recoil spring, you also might want to consider adding a Shok-Buffer to your spring guide to prevent impact damage to your frame. At one point, I had some trouble racking the slide on a couple 1911s. Turned out the problem wasn't grip strength but simple dry skin. Still have trouble opening plastic bags sometimes.
Just thinking about dropping a couple of pounds until I build myself up again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,182 Posts
Just thinking about dropping a couple of pounds until I build myself up again.
That sounds like a good plan. I keep a piece of white flannel with a bit of paste wax inside the soft gun case to wipe down the gun after handling to avoid rust and that seems to be enough to wet my hands slightly to make gripping the slide easier. These days, I also handle and dry fire a couple 1911s just about every day which probably isn't bad exercise because of the need to clear each gun before dry firing. The recoil springs I am using were usually 18.5 pounds but the most recent one I put in was a 17 pound Wolff. It replaced a stock Colt spring which measured a bit over 14 pounds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
That sounds like a good plan. I keep a piece of white flannel with a bit of paste wax inside the soft gun case to wipe down the gun after handling to avoid rust and that seems to be enough to wet my hands slightly to make gripping the slide easier. These days, I also handle and dry fire a couple 1911s just about every day which probably isn't bad exercise because of the need to clear each gun before dry firing. The recoil springs I am using were usually 18.5 pounds but the most recent one I put in was a 17 pound Wolff. It replaced a stock Colt spring which measured a bit over 14 pounds.
Pretty cool that you are least measuring that stuff before you swap it out.

:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,182 Posts
Pretty cool that you are least measuring that stuff before you swap it out.
I decided to buy a spring tester because I have quite a few used recoil springs and was wondering about the general wisdom of changing out recoil springs every 3000 rounds or so. I was pretty sure they were not wearing out all that fast.
They all look about the same to me and I don't see the point of throwing out perfectly good springs.
The 14 pound spring was one that was original to a gun that was manufactured in 1986, It has only seen perhaps 2000 to 3000 rounds total, I thought the spring was weak from the measurement, but from discussions around here, it seems like the spring was probably no different from when it left the factory. 14 pounds is apparently pretty common for a factory spring though I only found that out after I swapped in a 17 pound Wolff spring which, by the way, measured almost exactly 17 pounds.
Now I don't have to guess what I am looking at and when a spring needs replaced. (No, I did not throw out the 14 pound spring.)

- Ivan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Speaking of Tisas spring weights. I called the SD imports and spoke to a Tisas rep. He told me the 9mm 1911 was 16 lbs. I questioned that because mine seems lots less than that. He said the .45 was 18 lbs. What to make of that? I also tried a 14 lb spring in my Garrison today,,and it worked with most everything I put through it. Nevertheless I'll probably take the Springfield CS rep's suggestion and replace the 14 with a 12 which is max weight as far as the factory is concerned for a 9mm. The original spring weight for the 9mm was 9 lbs. Where does one get a spring tester?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
14 pounds is apparently pretty common for a factory spring though I only found that out after I swapped in a 17 pound Wolff spring which, by the way, measured almost exactly 17 pounds.
Now I don't have to guess what I am looking at and when a spring needs replaced. (No, I did not throw out the 14 pound spring.)

- Ivan.
My comped 1911 needs (at most) a 12lb recoil spring to reliably cycle / run regular pressure 45acp (230grain FMJ @ 800ish fps) ammo. Much more than that (spring wise) turns it into a single shot firearm.

Very minimal slide dip when things go back into battery.

Good grief that thing is fun to shoot and fun to shoot fast! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
wearing some thin Leather Shooting gloves helps,, wearing gloves helps in a lot of Physical Activity. i too have grip issues due to neck and nerve problems. when i first picked up my new Tisas Service Model i thought for sure it would be too much for me to shoot. now after 250 rounds it is considerably looser and easier to use. i still use gloves though when using it or most of my other handguns. good luck to you...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,179 Posts
Dang, ask the time and some one tells you have to build a watch!! I have 9 mm’s. I asked about a .45 ACP. If you can’t answer the question please stay out of the conversation. Unless you are building up postings!
You have the sense of humor of a rock :geek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
549 Posts
Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Road Rat which Tisas model do you have?
I bought the 1911A1 that normally sells MSRP $419.

The only reason I bought it is they were sold as BLEMS since the finish on the slides did not exactly match the frames. IF you hold it just right the light will let you see the difference!! For $319.00 shipped, no taxes, etc., I didn't care and bought two. In my hand for $339.99 each.
 
21 - 40 of 42 Posts
Top