1911Forum banner
21 - 36 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,698 Posts
Here are three video's I like. They are all a little different, and use different products, but they all work. Pick what you like and discard the rest.

Dave Anderson - note at the end how he lubes without field stripping, a handy tip ...
1911s been around for 110+ years so many ways to clean them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,698 Posts
No one has touched on the classic "idiot mark" on the 1911.

The proof that a private, second lieutenant or a sailor was issued your pistol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
If it slides, grease it. If it rotates, oil it.
I prefer to use grease on the rails, especially in a hit climate and when the gun is carried vertically (ie, in a holster) for long periods.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
76,465 Posts
If you haven't already seen it, check out this older thread:


Remember that there are differences between lubricating a 1911 meant for shooting and merely preserving a collectible one to protect the finish. A shooter 1911 only needs a bit of oil on the moving parts. A collectible one meant to stay in the safe needs a complete coat of oil inside and out, preferably an oil that won't quickly evaporate or drain off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
772 Posts
I order my sperm (whale) oil from a place called Pequod's in Massachusetts. The owners name is Ahab but I usually talk with Ishmael to place my order. It take a long time to get here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,350 Posts
Remember that there are differences between lubricating a 1911 meant for shooting and merely preserving a collectible one to protect the finish. A shooter 1911 only needs a bit of oil on the moving parts. A collectible one meant to stay in the safe needs a complete coat of oil inside and out, preferably an oil that won't quickly evaporate or drain off.
+1

I’m a big fan of Breakfree CO Collector preservative. It’s a thick synthetic oil that doesn’t gum up and stays where you put it. They claim that their product will preserve metal for up to 5 years, but I have some pistols that I treated almost 8 years ago. They still look amazing inside and out.

Another great benefit, is that if its a firearm that you occasionally shoot, just run a dry patch through the barrel and let er rip. No need to disassemble and dengunk, it’s shooter ready.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Well, I fired it dry straight out the box from CMP. It came very clean with no oil or grease in sight. Shot 50 rounds of Federal American Eagle ball and had several FTFs. It worried me until it dawned on me I needed to maybe lube it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Well folks, I cleaned and lubricated my WW2 1911A1 using tips from here.

Can’t wait to see if this alone will resolve my failure to feed issue.
Here’s what I did:
1) I applied some little dabs or armorers grease on the slide rails and frame rails
2) I sprayed Breakfree CLP-4 liberally on the barrel, trigger, slide, frame, and magazine.
3) I then used a small toothbrush to spread the oil into the various nooks and crannies (firing pin, trigger assebly, magazine shoot inside frame, spring, etc.)
4) Afterwards, I mopped up excess oil using a white t-shirt rag. Using a cleaning rod, I pushed the cloth into the magazine well to remove excellent cleaner/lube oil from there.
5) I reassembled the parts being careful to properly align the barrel catch either realease pin. Little tricky here but worked easily enough.
6) With magazine removed I operated the slide vigorously back and fort several times, then again with magazine inserted.
7)Can’t wait to shoot it tomorrow!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,894 Posts
Shot 50 rounds of Federal American Eagle ball and had several FTFs.
If you have any malfunctions with your now well lubed pistol, don't clear the malfunction immediately. Instead, take some close up pictures from several angles showing the malfunction and take special note of the position of the bullet nose relative to the feed ramp and barrel as well as the position if the case rim relative to the extractor claw. Then post the pictures and your description of the malfunction here so folks can diagnose the problem and give you suggestions on how to fix it.

Also take note of which round in the magazine was involved in the malfunction e.g. 2nd round, last round, etc.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
If you have any malfunctions with your now well lubed pistol, don't clear the malfunction immediately. Instead, take some close up pictures from several angles showing the malfunction and take special note of the position of the bullet nose relative to the feed ramp and barrel as well as the position if the case rim relative to the extractor claw. Then post the pictures and your description of the malfunction here so folks can diagnose the problem and give you suggestions on how to fix it.

Also take note of which round in the magazine was involved in the malfunction e.g. 2nd round, last round, etc.
Ok, I’ll do that. Appreciate the offer. I hope the lube does the trick.

About the springs. Is that something I need to replace straightaway or wait for an issue?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
76,465 Posts
Well, I fired it dry straight out the box from CMP. It came very clean with no oil or grease in sight. Shot 50 rounds of Federal American Eagle ball and had several FTFs. It worried me until it dawned on me I needed to maybe lube it.
Like most older designs 1911s do not like to run bone-dry. You have to have some oil on the slide/frame rails at the very least.

About the springs. Is that something I need to replace straightaway or wait for an issue?
Get a fresh 16# factory-spec recoil spring and extra-power firing pin spring from Wolff or Wilson. You shouldn't need to replace any of the other springs.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I ordered the 16# spring from Wilson. It comes with another spring. Is the firing pin spring flat forked spring steel part? l didn’t see a description for the second spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
Some of us have been shooting 1911s 20 years before Glock was ever conceived. So its like comparing apples to oranges and some people have zero experience with Glocks. Just an FYI
You must be talking about me . I never owned a Glock and don’t know anything about them. A good old 1911 or and S&W or Colt wheel pistol is more my style.
 
21 - 36 of 36 Posts
Top