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When I got my first Glock years ago, I was uncomfortable carrying it chambered because it was the first semi-auto without a safety that I had ever owned. I would cock it then insert a full mag and carry it cocked but unchambered. Every few days I would remove the mag and KNOWING it was unchambered I would point it in a safe direction and pull the trigger. Each time it clicked letting me know that it was still cocked and that the trigger had not accidently or negligently been pulled. This went on for 2 or 3 months as I began to feel more confident that the gun would not just go off if I was careful in handling it properly and especially with extra precaution when holstering. The day came when I felt ready to start carrying chambered and I loaded a round and never looked back. I can understand where someone is coming from when they are uncomfortable with a chambered round because I was there for a couple of months myself. I have never felt the least bit uncomfortable with a cocked and locked 1911.
Best response so far.
I got my first GLOCK in my late 30s or maybe 40+, I don't really remember. By then I was a well seasoned CCr so there was no issue as far as carrying it condition 1.
I guess I never gave it a thought.
 

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One of the most heated arguments involving handguns is the proper carry method of the 1911 semi-automatic pistol, or any other single-action semi-auto. I’ve found that those who carry single-action pistols are relentless in their convictions, either adamantly for carrying them “cocked-and-locked" or carrying on an empty chamber.

What say ye...

It's same thing as the male/female sexes.

There are only two.

A gun that is ready for use has a round chambered, hammer cocked and thumb safety engaged. Anything else is most decidedly not ready for use.



There are males.....and females......that's it.



Some things don't nee a pile of debate as they are generally that damn simple to grasp.....yet so many don't seem to.
 

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One of the most heated arguments involving handguns is the proper carry method of the 1911 semi-automatic pistol, or any other single-action semi-auto. I’ve found that those who carry single-action pistols are relentless in their convictions, either adamantly for carrying them “cocked-and-locked" or carrying on an empty chamber.

What say ye...
Cocked and locked? Y'mean ANOTHER safety? Unlocked is just like a striker fired gun then so why the thumb safety?

Seriously, that's the polymer crowd mindset :)

It's not only SAO guns, Even my older S&W's, Beretta's, Tanfos, S&W M&P (Yes mine has a TS) Browning, and Sig P226 X5 have a TS and whilst shooting or carrying the TS is on when I don't want it to go bang.

For every situation where the user forgot to snick the safety off in a firefight in the last hundred+ years (which I doubt are many if any) I bet there were thousands of AD's with striker fired guns. I know I've seen those :)
 

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1911's, a bunch and counting...
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While I may not have my edc on me every second I am in the house...I carry all the time when I am working outside, going to the store, etc. A coworker carries occasionally, says he moves around too much at work to carry at work. I carry at work 100% of the time, our owner is perfectly fine with it. I believe learning to live with the gun is essential. To be familiar with it, to have it a part of your everyday routine. You can't plan when you'll need it.

I carry my little xds9 when I need maximum concealability or while rv camping, lots of sitting. My 1911 is carried almost any other time.
 

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It doesn't matter how you carry a 1911 - you're either safe or you are not. FWIW, John Browning carried his semi auto pistols on half cock - he considered the half cock notch as a safety - his personal 1911 had no thumb safety because he thought it was unnecessary. He only designed the thumb safety because the Army Ordnance Board demanded it. As far as I know he never managed to shoot himself or anyone else unintentionally.
 

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Perhaps, if you are uncomfortable with condition one, you need to carry something with double action, or a safe action like a Glock. With the 1911 the only way to carry is cocked and locked and this also is the only way to carry a Browning HP.
 

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No, cocked and locked is simply one way to carry it. Ask anyone who was in the military how it was carried. Nobody used cocked and locked. Cocked and locked IS the fastest way to bring it to bear. But there are many people who have no business with Condition One.
 

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Gotta add my $.02...currently carry Sig 229 SAO cocked 'n locked. DW ECP coming this weekend and after "break-in" will be carrying cocked 'n locked...

I've never given it a thought...out, thumb, "fire when ready"...
 

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I have yet to think of a scenario where I'd prefer Condition 2, hammer down on a live round.
The chief problem with hammer down on a loaded round is the risk you take getting it to this state.
While there are guns with 'decockers' the 1911 is not one.
You have to pull the trigger and control the hammer to prevent firing.
 

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In my youth I would carry my Colt SAA in 357 Magnum with an empty chamber only on horseback. Around the ranch I would load all six.
I too carry the Colt SAA with the hammer down on an empty chamber.
If I suspected I might need six, I loaded six with the hammer down
with the firing pin nose resting between
the rim two cartridge cases.

As for the 1911 it’s cocked & locked…

///
 

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The thing that bothers me about condition 2 carry is not getting it ready to fire but the risks associated with mashing the trigger and lowering the hammer on a chambered round. Bad things can happen...loud noises and holes in things that you would just as soon not have holes in...in other word a negligent discharge. Condition 1 for me.
There's a movie from 1986 titled FX that had a federal agent named Lipton as an antagonist. That character carried condition 2 so he could cock the hammer to intimidate people and then decock it to put it up. My brother and I found that amusing and ridiculous. Typical Hollywood BS. :ROFLMAO:
 

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My take is the conversation stays relevant because folks like me are just starting to consider carry and run flat into the question.
For myself I know damn well what the arguments are and have some of my own ideals on them.

Years back the coach on my local BE league looked at the gun I bought and dismissed the safety- “we don’t use those”.
All these years I used a safety on a pistol once and it was yesterday.
I was trying to clear a dud from a new rimfire gun and flipped on the safety figuring why not.
Two minutes later I couldn’t get the gun to fire so packed it up for the day.
It took me getting home to figure out the safety was on…

The bedside- condition three safety off.
I am pretty well convinced a carry should be condition 1

But…
I bought a first sample of the carry type gun and it’s a Hk striker- no safety with their fairly light short take up trigger.
It says right in the manual to NOT holster with round in tube…

So take me as a sample of one of the typical kind of idiot who is wondering about carry condition.
I’m a good example of why this will always be a relevant topic…
 

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Other than my 1911s and a Hi-Power, I don't own any other pistols that have a safety. Of course, a revolver doesn't have a safety and how many years have they been around? And a revolver is usually considered the safest type of handgun. Sig P229, Kahr PM9, no safeties. A lot of professionals, Texas Rangers etc. have had the grip safety on a 1911 disabled [pinned or tied] and the Hi-Power doesn't have a grip safety. Contrary to what that actor said, if you don't pull the trigger the gun wont fire!
 

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So the question remains- would you carry the 1911 or BHP with the safety off?

My observation is that there are two distinct gun cultures which are dependent on the gun in hand.

There is to my mind a curious shift in attitude on this question which is hardware driven.

I mentioned it before- this nice Hk I have has a lighter pull than my BHPs .
It would be a safer gun if provided with a manual safety.
Trigger/muzzle discipline is essential for any firearm but it is used to explain away the need for a manual safety when in discussion of those arms which lack it.

Its just odd to my mind to shift the discussion in this manner based on the manual of arms not on universal principle.
 
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