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Shipped Oct of 1946. Purchased by a WW2 vet right after he got back to the states. He was severely wounded three weeks before the end and spent awhile in the hospital system. The original RedHead holster accompanied the pistol as well.




I know several members have some P/w p/w guns on this forum, let's see em.
The polished blue with plastic military grips is a personal favorite.



 

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That's a nice pick-up, mpd1978. That variation Super 38 is interesting indeed. As requested, here is my PWPW Super 38, a sibling born of the same year as yours. It has a small blemish on the slide above the serial number. Other than that, it's a nice pistol. I showed the Swartz safety cut-outs also.







 

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Piexcel
You have a beautiful pistol. Its funny that most of the 46 guns seem to have prewar hammers, wheras the 400 guns shipped to the OSS all seem to have flat side hammers.
 

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mpd1978, thanks. I've never personally seen an OSS Super 38. I saw one for sale years ago at some online site. It was all beat to hell and IIRC sold for a paltry sum of about $1500 (in relation to what Colt Super 38s usually fetch). All I remember is that the serial number for that gun fell in the range of the OSS guns. But I don't remember what the hammer looked like.
 

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Here is mine. If you have Sheldon's book and look on page 116, you'll notice his pistol is 37028. That pistol has a prewar hammer and mine has a wartime made hammer.
 

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Very nice, houstonsagman. At first I thought your hammer is what it is because Colt exhausted its supply of pre-war hammers. But then I realized your pistol is serialed several hundred before mine. And I have the pre-war hammer.

And BTW, good photography to both you gentlemen. I can't match it.
 

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It is known that Colt never threw anything away, but I too would be suspicious of any post-war pistol with a component from that long ago without having similar pistols to compare to.
 

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Its prudent to be suspicious in this hobby however, Sheldon makes this point himself in his book and provided a photograph as reference. Also in the link below, please notice the coloring of the sear pin. Yep, it's fireblued from early production! So either its conspiracy or there's a legitimate explanation as to why these parts might show up (like Colt cleaning house while they retool and prepare for Commercial production after the war!). Of course, a prudent person would also observe wear patterns and such as well. The only other alternative is there is a 1911 psycho out there switching parts on nice pistols with parts from the earliest production, to what end I wonder? God help us in that case!
http://www.coltautos.com/1911a1_Super38_36864.htm
 

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Well, I wouldn't go so far as to say "Anything Goes", but like dsk suggests, you need to be on your toes when dealing with some specific variations. Pre/Post war Supers being one of them. You don't exactly see them growing on tree's and I would want to inspect before purchase if possible. I'm sure that 1912-13 parts used would be an even smaller minority in the 1946 cleanup considering the totals. Sheldon says 1,548 matching slide/frame pistols gas fire finished before the war were available for assembly in late August of 1946. By December, all of the prewar finished frames/slides had been largely exhausted. 400 had already been used for the Government and OSS contracts right before the war ended.
 
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