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Sometimes I forget to change the moisture packs in my safe (I live in a high humidity area apparently). Seems if I forget, and I neglect my guns for a while because of work, life, etc. it's my Colt 1911 S70 that suffers the most.

The other day I opened up the safe and on the chamber hood of the S70 there was a thick brown layer of rust (I think rust? It was pretty caked on there). I cleaned it up the best I could. There was also some on the hammer. All of my other guns were pristine and free of rust.

I will pay better attention and oil the Colt and be better about moisture control but how come the Colt seems to rust so much more than the other guns? Also have 870 shotguns, Marlin and Winchester lever actions, Sigs, CZs, etc.
 

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If the pistol is a blued one, it can also be the "salts" used in the process due to multiple reasons. Sounds like it if you have other similar materials stored in a common environment with different results.
 

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Both the barrel hood and hammer sides are left in the "white" so they are bare steel.

As you stated you are in a high moisture area. I would lean towards using a grease on bare steel areas since oil dries out fairly quickly.
 

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Frog Lube it and I believe it will help a lot. My S70 seemed to have had the same issue and I live on the gulf coast.
 

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I second the suggestion for Frog Lube.

After my Dad died I discovered that his safe dehumidifier had ceased to function at some point. I've spent many an hour removing rust and coating with Frog Lube. The rust is just a memory now.

I use Frog Lube on all of my guns, including my EDC Commander. I haven't had a problem yet.
 

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BC, Canada is located in the same "rain belt" as Seattle where I live. I've never have a problem with rust due to moisture, even on my Series 70s. While it may get pretty wet outside during the winter months the humidity remains fairly low, and I don't keep my safe in the garage where ground moisture would be an issue. I always use Brake-Free CLP on the outside of my firearms and it seems to do the job just fine, even on the naked steel chamber hoods and hammers of my Colts. If for some reason rust continues to be a problem then I suggest keeping the pistols stored in kraft boxes with VCI paper wrapped around them.
 

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I live in Nevada. I'm not sure I've ever seen rust....;-)

Seriously though, I lived in Florida for exactly one year, and my first week in our new house I noticed the hammer on my 1911 starting to rust. One of the many reasons I got the heck out of there and moved back west.
 

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You take that back.

Florida is a tropical paradise, sir...or at least looks that way from here.
20140225_152516 by Slick_Rick77, on Flickr

...or maybe a swamp...whichever.

The humidity alone is not a big deal. I've found that conditions that create condensation will rust up any gun in a hurry. I use lots of lube, gun socks and wax paper.

The only gun that's been a concern is an AK of all things.
 

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People down here in the SW have good luck with CLP type products. Even though it is hot and dry during part of the year a lot of folk still have evaporative cooling or "swamp boxes" which pumps water vapor in your house. I am lucky as I have air conditioning which pumps water out of the house during the Monsoon or rainy season which is right now.
 

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People down here in the SW have good luck with CLP type products. Even though it is hot and dry during part of the year a lot of folk still have evaporative cooling or "swamp boxes" which pumps water vapor in your house. I am lucky as I have air conditioning which pumps water out of the house during the Monsoon or rainy season which is right now.
Here in Atlanta I use Break Free CLP and noticed the other day whilst cleaning inside of my NIB New Agent's barrel that the Break Free had dripped out reddish in color. Unlike the op I didn't see rust anywhere else, because of that I'm not sure if it was rust or not. What do you guys/gals think?

In the past whilst living in South Florida I've had great results with using Break Free CLP, I thought it was kinda strange that I might have rust inside a NIB barrel in Atlanta.
 

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Colt uses a preservative oil that is reddish in color and congeals quickly, leading a lot of people to think it's rust. Clean the pistol out good, re-lube with CLP, then worry later if you see anything reddish come back.
 

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Colt uses a preservative oil that is reddish in color and congeals quickly, leading a lot of people to think it's rust. Clean the pistol out good, re-lube with CLP, then worry later if you see anything reddish come back.
Sorry, I should have stated that I had cleaned the barrel before. I'm really meticulous about maintaining my firearms. I've not had this happen with any other Colt, H&K, or any other firearm.
 

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Doesn't the New Agent come with a stainless barrel?
 

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It seems to be a hit or miss sort of thing. I have a blued Colt commander that is one of my oldest Colts that has never shown any propensity for rusting. I once had a blued Colt 38 super that, sitting in the same drawer, had a tendency to rust inside the dust cover, when I have never had a problem with any other pistol doing the same. Not sure what the difference was...got rid of that one though, and the next couple Colts I purchased were stainless. Still no issues with that early commander though.
 

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I thought all Colts made in the last few years had stainless barrels. Am I wrong about that?
Almost all of today's 1911s (any major manufacturer) have stainless steel barrels.

This doesn't mean they won't or can't rust. They most certainly can.

As mentioned in post #3, these steel surfaces have no protection from parkerization/phosphate treatments or any coatings. Protection is limited to the chromium percentage content (which most owners have no way of readily determining) and any anti-oxidation agents applied by the owner.

OP -- once rust starts, even a trace amount that's not visible to the eye, the unfortunate process of chemical oxidation has already begun. And it is hard to stop, even if all evidence visible to the eye is removed and oil or anti-oxidation agent (elg., Barricade) is reapplied.. Somehow, this got started on your Colt 1911s (probably long before you knew it; conceivably before you even purchased the firearm). Whether it occurred specifically/solely on your Colts due to possibly low chromium content, pre-existing exposures, or other factors (not affecting your other firearms) is hard to say at this time. As you say, this rust (assuming you've accurately identified the matter as rust) is the reality of what's occurred in your safe/home. All you can do is probably move on and make the best use these 1911s.

I know this isn't the most optimistic message, but it is likely to be the reality. Given that your other guns are fine, it is entirely possible that you've "done no wrong" here ... or that you've at least given enough care to preseve all of your other firearms ... which means you were doing a lot of things right.
 

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Coming from the snow,(Northern Indiana) to the Deserts around Yuma My rust killer was to putting silicone sprayed socks on my weapons. Silicone sprayed heavily on the insides of the socks before inserting the weapons. Never has a speck of rust in either locations. I did clean them well and use Rem Oil on all of them before the socks but with that NO rust in the snow or the desert areas where I live. Maybe it is a bad blue job from the factory that was never finished properly. After the rust bluing they take several steps to finish that weapon. May have missed one before it was boxed and sent out.
 

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Sometimes I forget to change the moisture packs in my safe (I live in a high humidity area apparently). Seems if I forget, and I neglect my guns for a while because of work, life, etc. it's my Colt 1911 S70 that suffers the most.

The other day I opened up the safe and on the chamber hood of the S70 there was a thick brown layer of rust (I think rust? It was pretty caked on there). I cleaned it up the best I could. There was also some on the hammer. All of my other guns were pristine and free of rust.

I will pay better attention and oil the Colt and be better about moisture control but how come the Colt seems to rust so much more than the other guns? Also have 870 shotguns, Marlin and Winchester lever actions, Sigs, CZs, etc.
How long is it between safe openings?
 
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