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Discussion Starter #1
okay, i ran into this beautiful colt buntline 45 l.c. sn#sa450XX, turned only a little, in 99.999% condition for around $1400. i am buying it. should be in my hands in a few months (bad timing, due to the season). my main question is:

I WANT TO SHOOT IT, BUT SHOULD I?

also, any advice for a new colt sa owner?
any way to tell what generation it is?
year exactly?
any websites ?

thanks. i will post a pic when i get it.
i am soooo excited. almost peed my pants when i saw it.



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Nothing like the smell of Breakfree to make my day complete.


[This message has been edited by BOLANTEJ (edited 11-24-2001).]
 

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All firearms are manufactured to be used. That being said, shooting a collectable gun can lower its value. If this gun has already been fired, go ahead and shoot it, but be careful. Every pull of the trigger could be costing you money. On the other hand, if you plan on keeping it indefinitely, enjoy it, but take care of it. It sounds as if you have come upon a really nice pistol. Enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thank you. i will and i have.



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Nothing like the smell of Breakfree to make my day complete.
 

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I wouldn't buy it if I wasn't going to shoot it. $1400's a lot to invest in a gun you're just going to look at.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
i agree. the thought of having such a beauty sit in the safe makes me quiver. thanks for your insight.

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Nothing like the smell of Breakfree to make my day complete.
 

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With the "SA" as a prefix, It is 3rd Generation. $1400 is reasonable as long as the box and papers are part of the deal. Down the road, having the box and papers will mean serious $$$ if you ever want to sell it.

Being a "turned" 3rd gen., shooting it (kindly) will not hurt it much.

Guys who compete in SASS and CAS events like 2nd and 3rd gen. guns for shooters...2nd Gen. are preferred because they are configured most like the orignal (pre-war)SAA's.

NEVER SHOOT 1ST GEN. GUNS (NO "SA" PREFIX OR SUFFIX)UNLESS IT IS A BEATER/MIX-MATCH OR YOU DON'T CARE ABOUT ITS POTENTIAL VALUE...These are the ones that fetch megga buck$ and condition is a major factor.

Parts for 2nd and 3rd gen. guns are easy to come by, but keeping it original is most desireable.

Suggestion: shoot factory "cowboy" loads (ie. Black Hills ammo) or lighter hand loads most of the time.

I just got an early (1962) 2nd Gen. gun in .357 mag with a 7.5" bbl. on a straight-up trade for a new Springfield S.S. "loaded". It came with a Bianchi gunfighter leather rig. The gun is about 98% blue/80% case colors, no box/papers. I will probably never sell or trade it, so I have no problem shooting it. I generally run .38's and .38+P's through it... ocasionally mild .357's. And, if I ever need parts, I know where to get them and I can work on it myself.

I have had peacemaker "Clones" in the past, but they just don't have the same appeal as the orignal Colts.

Own one and you will know. I will try to look your SN. up and see if I can find a production date.

Here is some useful data:

1st Gen.: 1873-1940 (SN's have no prefix/suffix).

2nd Gen.: 1956-1976 (SN's have an "SA" suffix).

3rd Gen.: 1976- (SN's have "SA" Prefix... some early 3rds have an "S" prefix and an "A" suffix ie. "SXXXXXXA".

The major difference between the 1st Gen.(pre-war)and the 2nd Gen. is that first Gen. guns had longer cyl. flutes and beveled cyl. faces.

The major differences between 2nd and 3rd Gen. (besides workmanship) is that the 3rd Gen. guns don't have a separate cylinder bushing like the 1st and 2nd Gen. guns.

Please remember, as with any single action gun with a firing pin on the hammer, not to put the hammer down on a loaded chamber.

To accomplish this, load one chamber, skip one, then load the remaining four. Using your thumb, lower the hammer and you will have the hammer down on an EMPTY chamber.

This is the only safe way to carry a loaded single action without a transfer bar (like Ruger's and other clones).

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks for the informed post. i'm assuming it's a 3rd gen. i can't wait to get my hands on it. take care.

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First of all, I must make a correction... I stated that some early 3rd Gen. guns had S.N.'s that had an "S" prefix and an "A" suffix; that did not start happening until about 1983.

Your (prospective) gun is of 1980 production.

If you do get the Buntline, you should also consider getting a Colt factory letter. They are about $100.00 ea. and include all the factory details regarding configuration and exact production date. It comes in the form of a watermarked, Colt letterhead document that "legitimizes" the gun even more.

Go to Colt's website for more info.

Another little tidbit... If you were to go about trying to order a new SAA, you'd be paying upwards of $1600.00 and be added to a backlog of orders that extends a couple of years (depending on the features you order).

So picking up a nice used one is a good investment; especially at a time when Colt's future, or at least the future of the SAA is somewhat murky.

Greg
 
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