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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I put a used Colt MK IV Series 80 on layaway. Its the blued Government model that is bone stock as far as I could tell. About the only think wrong with it was a minor scratch on the frame, but thats no prob cause its going to be a build up. The gun seems like it was never fired or the owner just took real good care of it. Total w/ tax and everything came out to be $520 and I am wondering if I got ripped off or is it a steal? Also, what do you guys think about using this as a base gun or should I continue to look for a Series 70?
 

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I think you made a real good buy. Prices vary in different areas of the country but even at a total of $520 you are still in real good shape price wise.

I'm not into the real custom gun thing, whatever that is. I have two MK IV series 80 Colts and the only thing I did to is remove the FP parts on one and the other is stock. I have a lot of rounds thru both guns and I have never had a problem with either one of them.

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turn that series 80 into a series 70
sounds like a decent price
 

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I have a series 70 Government 45. Which I want to eventually turn into a full custom pistol, capable of competition. Because I don't compete, I just have fun fully utilizing my potential. Also I have been shooting this particular 70 since 83 or 84. I might just do this with a pre 70 NM, I have'nt decided which to have customized yet. I already have a 1991 customized and its fun to shoot. Just like the Commercial NM and 70 Government in their stock configuration.
 

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I have two Series 80s which Wilson built. Everyone who tries either comments on the quailty of the trigger pull. Since the quality of the trigger pull is the major complaint against the firing pin safety, I don't see the problem.

A friend of mine recently had a KB with his Kimber. As best we can tell, it was a slamfire caused by a flacid firing pin spring. The FP block in a Series 80 would have prevented it. I understand that Kimber is coming out with a firing pin block of their own, albeit not of the same design as the Colt.


Yr. Obt. Svnt.

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Fred J. Drumheller
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I can make a series 80 trigger feel REAL GOOD. I think the fuss over the firing pin safety is unwarranted.
 

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Originally posted by James P:
I can make a series 80 trigger feel REAL GOOD. I think the fuss over the firing pin safety is unwarranted.
I agree 100 % James. I have never felt that the series 80 parts were a burden to me.
 

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B5,

I think you did well -- I would have done the same thing, and perhaps even paid a bit more if necessary. It's mighty tough to "wave off" once you get the gun in your hand.

Also, I have to echo what Pampers, James P and shane45_1911 have all said ... I think that the griping about the Series 80 parts is unwarranted. You can still have the gun tuned exactly to your liking, and you'll get a bit of extra peace of mind along the way.

I would built up that Series 80 without hesitation. IMHO, you just might end up with a better overall product than if you started with a Series 70 ... how's that for heresy?!


Chuck
 

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Was this with factory ammo? If not, a high primer seems much more likely.

Originally posted by Pampers:
A friend of mine recently had a KB with his Kimber. As best we can tell, it was a slamfire caused by a flacid firing pin spring. The FP block in a Series 80 would have prevented it. I understand that Kimber is coming out with a firing pin block of their own, albeit not of the same design as the Colt.


Yr. Obt. Svnt.
 

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if its the mkIV series 80, i wonder if the customizing will hhurt the value. now let me contridict myself... if your buying it to shoot, do whatever you want to it, you got a good deal, and make it with your touch.

however, i read along time ago that if your gonna build a custom shooter, buy the cheapest and build on that, because most of the same things get changed anyway.

my opinion is leave it stock, find a 91A1 to work on.

i almost cry when i see a gold cup at a gun show and someone has taken the axe to it.

do whatever you feel, just thought i would give my spill

russel the cop
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi Russel. The gun is used so the value has already decreased, plus its going to be a shooter anyways, so why not
The reason I decided not to get the 91 cause I dont like the big ugly roll markings
I found the MK IV Gvt Series 80 sitting next to a 1991 stainless for $760 and opted for the used instead. For $520 out the door, I figured I could spend the extra $200+ on ammo, holster, and extras. As far as upgrading the gun, as soon as I have the money, im considering having Dane do a retro look to it w/ barsto barrel, serrate flat top , etc. When this gun is done, it will be a keeper.
 

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I would just as soon use a MKIV Series as ANYTHING as the base of a custom gun.

Talkin' about heresy, I actually prefer the 80's firing pin block over a gun without.
When the 80's safety timing is properly advanced and tuned, the action of the lower lever on the rear of the trigger bow, is not unlike the extra finger of a 4 finger sear spring. As most of you know, this prevents trigger bounce from causing the hammer to follow the slide.
One of the tricks is to machine the top of the hammer, to a flat, parallel to the slide, when cocked. This will both increase the life of the trigger job, by reducing the return slam associated with overcocking, and also be far gentler on the semi-fragile rib of the disconnector slot of the slide.
Be sure to allow sufficient overcock for a possible future tune-up, and also radius/bevel the leading and trailing corners of this flat.

The only downsides of the MKIV VS a 1991A1 would be the slide serrations and the greater expense of machining a matching set in the front. Also flattening a round top exposes an additional .030" of the front sight, effectively increasing its height and 'findability'.
I typically serrate the enhanced rib, but find removing or shortening it to be too much work to get it to 'look' right.

Also.....with modern Colt's, I use all stock trigger parts, including the stock plastic trigger, and still offer a lifetime warranty on the trigger job. The stock trigger is drilled and tapped for an overtravel screw and for two set-screws, top and bottom, to be stoned to fit the raceway and eliminate the slop.

The enhanced 'high grip' cut on the frontstrap is actually uncomfotable to me, but can be readily reworked into a great, proper high cut.

For $520..........I'd buy it for me!!!



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Chuck Rogers
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Nothing wrong with a Series 80, I just turned in my Colt Gold Cup National Match into 1911-Heaven to be rebuilt after 100,000 plus rounds was shot through it in the past 15 years. Should be ready within week or two depending upon when all the Ed Brown parts get in for it.

You made a good decision, hope it all works out for you.

TC

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You did good boy !
 

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I wouldn't sweat customizing a Series 80 as long as the work is done by someone reputable. Remember, immense numbers of these things were made. There is also an awful lot of customizing you can do without permenantly altering the gun (e.g. add a fitted match barrel & keep the old one). And as for the Series 80 safety mucking up the trigger... any good gunsmith can make it as good as anything out there. My Delta Elite has a fantastic trigger, better than some custom pistols without the Series-80 dohickey.

And that price is GREAT! GOOOOOOD deal!

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CastleBravo
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[This message has been edited by CastleBravo (edited 04-26-2001).]
 

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I agree that if you are inclined to get work done, go ahead and don't worry about its lack of "originality" hurting the value, at least in terms of most of the typical add-ones you might make.

My Combat Commander had a crummy trigger job and is now a full auto after about 1000 rounds, which may sound cool but you sure have to hold on tight to keep from shooting into the sky at the range.

I have ordered a new sear and hammer. The other things, like extended safety and extended beavertail are typical add-ons and will increase its value, generally. I went with the extended beavertail because the sharp edges on the corners of the upper part of the grip safety started chewing into my hand on a good range session.

This is one fine piece, any way you slice it. The thing shoots through the same hole consistently at 25', with a 4.25" barrel (on this model) and is an absolute classic.

Although now that my trigger pull will be back to normal I will probbably have to re-learn how to shoot it.
 
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