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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if others would like to share pictures of their M1903/1908 Pocket Hammerless, 1908 Vest Pocket .25ACP, .380 Mustang and other small Colt pocket autos. Here is mine, a .380 M1908 dating back to 1927:



 

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Those are nice photos that bring back pleasant memories. One of my neighbors had a pocket hammerless .32. He used to take his sons and I shooting with. That was the first Colt Automatic I ever fired over 30 years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
In my experience the stainless Colts are prone to rusting, so be sure to clean that little guy out every once in awhile.
 

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DSK,
The rusty look is due to poor lighting, but your point is well taken. The aluminum frame does tend to show some corrosion under the grips. The "miracle" teflon finish (more like paint) of the newer lightweights doesn't seem to hold up as well as good old anodizing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The alloy frame shouldn't corrode, but I've seen at least two Mustang Pocketlite pistols with rusted slides. I've also seen stainless Colt 1911's with rust forming underneath the grips. It seems that Colt's stainless steels have a much higher carbon content than some other brands. As a result I usually advise somebody with a pistol such as yours to get the slide hard chromed.
 

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DSK,
A closer look does show some rust starting in the cocking grooves! Virgil here I come!

Just so no one thinks I'M trying to hi-jack this thread...
A pic of my Pony with her sister (my wife's)



How about a Vest Pocket from 1919:

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm surprised we don't have more folks here with Colt Model M's. They're the perfect matchup for a classic old Government .45 1911. Here are my two gems from 1927, the little guy and his big brother:

 

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Here is my vest pocket .25 Pony with two big brothers - I just really love that little gun - it's become my "Vegas" gun! - it's the only pic I have right now and the gun is at the other house....

this is a great thread - a nice variation on the usual

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Pity its two bigger brothers are no longer with it. Was the 'A1 original finish or reparkerized?
 

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dsk - sorry, I just matched up what I typed with the pic = I still have them all. For some reason I thought the pic I selected had a few Springfields in it and not the old Colts. I still have them all!

The A1 was a DCM gun sold in the 50's. It was made in 44. I still have the box, wax papers and triplicate receipt papers selling it from the Red River Depot for $17.50. Any thoughts on your part about when it was parked?? Original or an arsenal repark?
The older pony was shipped to the "Allied Expiditionary Forces France" in 1918 - that's the only history I could find on it.
 

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Hi, Paul,

Welcome to the forum! In answer to your question, it's the same procedure as disassembling a 1911 magazine. Use a padded object such as tape-wrapped screwdriver tip, etc. so as not to mar the follower. Push the follower down about 1/2 to 2/3 of the way into the magazine, and
then put something long and slender, such as a nail, etc. through the witness holes under the mag follower bottom.

That will catch the spring, but not the follower and release the follower to come up to the feed lips. You may have to tap/shake it depending on how clean/rusty, etc it all is, inside. The follower is an L-shaped piece with a tongue sticking down into the mag from the back of the follower body. Tilt the follower forward towards the front of the mag and slide it out in front of the feed lips. Once you have it out, then put your hand over the feed lips to catch the spring, and remove the nail holding it down.

LOOK AT THE ORIENTATION OF THE SPRING as it comes out of the mag tube; they only work one way!!! While you have it apart, it's a great time to clean out about 90 years worth of carbon and congealed oil. I use a .22 cal. cleaning rod end with patches and Hoppes solvent, and scrub the inside of the body until it comes clean. Also clean the underside/sides of the follower, and pay special attention to the undersides (insides) of the feed lips, as this is where a lot of carbon can build up. By wrapping a larger patch around the forward end of the cleaning rod tip, you can scrub the bottom plate of the mag from the inside, and dislodge all sorts of crud depending on how the mag has been treated for the last 100 years or so. Then dry out the mag; I put a VERY light coat of break-free on the inside using a patch on the cleaning rod, to prevent rust.

Insert your new spring, paying close attention to orient it the same way the original came out. Push it down into the mag body and capture it with your nail through the witness holes. Then, slide your follower back into the tube, the reverse of how it came out. Release the spring. You're not done yet:

Make sure the forward edge of the spring goes toward the forward edge of the follower, lying flat under the follower and allowing the spring to operate in a normal manner without kinks. Sometimes they will hang up tilted toward the back of the follower, and all you have to do is reach in under the follower, grab the front of the spring with your nail, pocket knife, whatever, and pull it toward the front of the follower until it snaps into place. Cycle it a time or two to make sure it operates smoothly and keeps the front of the follower pointing up as it goes up and down (like it's supposed to), and you're done.

Hope this helps,
John
 

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Thanks for the info!

I have been looking at that dang mag for a couple of days and was not able to figure out what was going on. It seems like a Chinese puzzle! Same thing with diassembling the pistol itself.

Regards,
Paul
 
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