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BRAVE EAGLE said:
How does the Lawman MKIV and the Trooper MK III
rank.
Thanks
I have always been a Python freak but my father purchased a Trooper about 1973. I have made a point of escorting it to the range whenever I visit. Very nice gun. (It shoots so well, I can't really tell the difference between his and mine (same bbl length). I highly recommend it.
 

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I had a MkIII 6" barrel that was the most accurate .357mag I ever owned. I ended up selling it and have always been sorry I did. I later bought a 4" trooper that wasn't nearly as accurate and suffered from small part breakage on a regular basis. If you do find a good used one check it out carefully.
 

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I just bought a used Trooper MKIII, nice gun and it has the Horsie on the side. It's bigger then a Model 19, about like a L-frame. It's harder to find grips, but Herretts and Hogue make wood ones. Haven't shot it much yet, but I like it so far, for a revolver. It's very under rated, get one before the price goes up, also look fo a King Cobra or Trooper MKV.
 

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Quality and accuracy-wise the Python is the "Rolls Royce" of the revolver world.

The Python is basically a custom built revolver, completely hand assembled and fitted, and has a hand polished exterior finish.

ON THE AVERAGE, a Python is the most accurate production DA revolver ever built, and was intended from the get-go to be the finest DA revolver ever built.

Like a horribly expensive Italian sports car, it isn't for everyone, and it can't be abused like lesser guns can, and still function.

The Colt Trooper Mark III was Colt's replacement for the older style guns which had the same action as the Python.
When it simply got too expensive to build hand made revolvers, Colt designed the Trooper Mark III action.

The Trooper Mark III action is a transfer-bar ignition system, with internal parts made of a fore-runner of Metal Injection Moulding (MIM), known as "Sintered Steel".

The Trooper Mark III was later upgraded with a "short action" design hammer and trigger, a vented barrel, and a more rounded grip frame, and was named the Trooper Mark V.
In the Mark V, the hammer and trigger were changed to cast steel.

In the mid-1980's, the Trooper Mark V was fitted with a new design vented and ribbed barrel, made in stainless steel, and sold as the King Cobra.

These later Colt guns are absolute TANKS.
Master gunsmith Jerry Kuhnhausen thought these were the strongest mid-frame revolvers ever built, mostly due to Colt's superior forged and heat treated frames and cylinders.

If these guns have ANY weakness, it's the firing pin.
It's "possible" a few firing pins "may" be too hard, and "might" break if the gun is dry fired too much.

If you do break a firing pin, it's a factory ONLY replacement.
To replace the firing pin, a special press, press punches, and support jigs are needed to remove and replace the firing pin bushing, and a special tool is needed to re-stake the bushing rivet.
Unless these special tools are used, the frame can be seriously damaged, or even ruined.

The "fix" for any firing pin issues, is to simply use snap caps when dry firing.

Other than that, These later Colt's are very high-quality guns.
From my personal experience dealing with them, seeing how the actions stand up to use, and the internal and external fit and finish, I rate them as about 1/2 step above the S&W 686, a full step above the Ruger GP-100, and head and shoulders above the Taurus.

So, I'd put the Python as the sports car, and the Trooper Mark III, Mark V, and King Cobra as a Hummer.
 

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Don't Know about the lawman, but

I had a trooper mkIII as the first gun I ever bought , and sadly , traded it away years ago before I knew enough to appreciate it. Great gun, very accurate, super trigger (bought used with trigger job). I wish I had it back.
 

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I have a Trooper MKIII and a King Cobra both have 4 inch barrel's and there both accuarate and are 100 % reliable. I hope the rumors of Colt making Pythons again IN 06 are true as I might find myself buying one....:cool:
 

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Speaking of the 'cream of the crop' a bunch of us go out every Dec for an annual plinking session. Every kind of firearm imaginable shows up. But the one that turns the most heads is the colt python elite, 6" polished SS. The owner becomes the center of attention which he throughly enjoys. He said that only time he ever consider selling it, he went into a pawn shop and the shop owner talked him out of the transaction... "something like "are you crazy, starving, etc.?"
 

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dfariswheel said:
In the mid-1980's, the Trooper Mark V was fitted with a new design vented and ribbed barrel, made in stainless steel, and sold as the King Cobra.
Like this? :rock: I love my Colt King Cobra 6" .357. Great revolver and a blast to shoot.

 

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The Lawman is simply the fixed sight version of the Trooper. I have Lawman MK IIIs and Trooper MK IIIs in nickel, blue, 2" and 4" and round butt. I have yet to experience any negatives with them. I carry them in Ruger GP-100 leather.
 

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I bought a 4" blue Python, NIB, in `65. It was the standard I used to test accuracy when I bought a new gun. Two years ago, I bought a 6" Trooper Mark III. On the first trip to the range, it outshot the Python. Maybe it's the extra 2",

John
 
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