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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking at hammers and sears on Midways website and there are two sears listen. One is a standard sear and the other is for the Gold Cup with the newer aluminum trigger. Different part numbers but same price.

Are there any experts that can tell me the true difference? I know the old style GC had the assist lever, but the discription indicates this is the newer.

Is there a difference in shape? According to Colt there is no difference in hammer's hook shape.
 

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GC sears have a small recess near the bottom of them for the little spring, as part of the sear depressor parts exclusive to them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks . . . so the real difference is the hand fitting of a GC verses a standard government model.

I am taking a swing at stoning the hammer and sear on a pistol I am putting back together. Do you see any reason not to hone factory Colt parts?

I still need the jigs and stones.

I will end up with a Remington GI model R1 with the following:

Springfield serrated mainspring housing, with Colt factory internals (around $30 complete)
Colt spur hammer, strut and pin
Colt hammer pin
Colt sear and disconnector ($11 on clearance for disconnector)
Colt sear pin
Colt aluminum 3 hole trigger (only $21.00)
Remington match barrel and bushing (barrel was stamped with an M and I was told this meant Match.

Replacing cheap factory safety with an extended Colt model (only $14.95)

Looking at some G10 grips to replace the wood ones.

Considering a Colt full length guide rod and cap from an XSE (anyone like or dislike this model?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
To learn mostly . . . pistol was not complete. Got it at a good price and figured why not.

For me the best way to learn is to get as much knowledge as possible then give it a try. This is how I started building 10/22s and AR15s
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Besides Colt parts to me are the best mix of quality and price and easiest to get. Colt doesn't seem to have as heavy of restrictions on parts like Ruger Remington and Springfield. Not to mention factory internals of Remingtons are very rough. My factory stock R1 has a country mile trigger creep with every bump in the road felt. I am trying to get the trigger to feel like my Range Officer with out using expensive custom parts. I installed a C&S kit on a friends R1 Enhanced and he really liked it. It was prefit and complete, but the Enhanced has a beavertail so it worked great.
 

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Colt sears and hammers are very decent factory parts and it is very easy to get a great trigger pull with minimum stoning. The primary sear face angle is already correct so all you have to do is adjust your jig to the sears angle, stone the primary and cut in a secondary.

The hammer hooks are around .022-.023 and can be taken down a little but not really necessary.

Colt internals are great for trigger jobs. Don't buy the Gold Cup sear. Just buy the standard Colt sear.

I would also look into buying a Colt NM barrel over the Remington barrel. The Colt match barrel is very under rated and is capable of great accuracy and usually only costs around 100 bucks.
 

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I had to replace the hammer and sear on a series 80 Combat Commander. I went with the Wilson Combat Bulletproof and they are simply outstanding. Just a thought.
 

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Colt sears and hammers are very decent factory parts and it is very easy to get a great trigger pull with minimum stoning. The primary sear face angle is already correct so all you have to do is adjust your jig to the sears angle, stone the primary and cut in a secondary.

The hammer hooks are around .022-.023 and can be taken down a little but not really necessary.

Colt internals are great for trigger jobs. Don't buy the Gold Cup sear. Just buy the standard Colt sear.

I would also look into buying a Colt NM barrel over the Remington barrel. The Colt match barrel is very under rated and is capable of great accuracy and usually only costs around 100 bucks.
Doesn't the Colt have a much narrower barrel hood than a Remington?
 

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Doesn't the Colt have a much narrower barrel hood than a Remington?
You are right, I'm not entirely sure what Remington uses so I apologize. Colt does use a narrow hood on series 80 models and the Colt semi drop in they sell is for that barrel hood size.

Although I did manage to find one online retailer claiming to have wide hood barrels in stainless and blued in stock.

http://www.midwestgunworks.com/page/mgwi/prod/SP57319
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all the help . . . I ordered the standard sear and I am now trying to decide whether to fit a grip safety of use a standard one.

On some other sites, all I got was, "waste of Time" "why bother" "sounds like kitchen table gunsmithing" blah blah blah.

I had no idea there were so many 1911 pre-madonnas that think no one else can learn the skill. But don't get me wrong, I have a great deal of respect for the 1911 expert! It is something I want to learn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Oh and by the way, I got the factory fitted barrel with it so I will just use that. I am not ready to try and fit a barrel yet. I need to learn more about that.
 

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I had to replace the hammer and sear on a series 80 Combat Commander. I went with the Wilson Combat Bulletproof and they are simply outstanding. Just a thought.
If I may, why did you have to replace them? I'm about to send off the same firearm to my smith and was on the fence about having the trigger job done on the stock Colt parts or replacing them.
 

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Sorry for the late reply as you already bought a Colt sear.

IMO, the Colt standard sear is not a good sear to work with. It is made using the MIM process. There are dimensional defects and hardness issues.

If you don't mind paying a little more, I would have suggested buying a machined sear from Wilson, EGW, EB, or others.
 

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Sorry for the late reply as you already bought a Colt sear.

IMO, the Colt standard sear is not a good sear to work with. It is made using the MIM process. There are dimensional defects and hardness issues.

If you don't mind paying a little more, I would have suggested buying a machined sear from Wilson, EGW, EB, or others.
What are these dimensional defects you speak of? I find them to be quite excellent. MIM and all.
 

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The primary surface is sometimes not even. One side is higher, usually on the right.

And there is no secondary surface.

MIM parts tend to be brittle. Seen so many chipped off or broken in half.

The very early Colt MIM sears were really bad. You could see it engage only one hook on the hammer.
 

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The broken MIM sears I was referring to was made in India by Indo-MIM. They are the world's largest MIM manufacturer, providing parts for US and European gun manufacturers.

The MIM process is described in their website. Cost of a MIM sear is around $2, provided you pay up front for tooling costs and order by the thousands.
 
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