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Discussion Starter #1
Most everyone says that the new "II" Kimbers' trigger pull is not affected by the firing pin blocking apparatus. On the other hand, many grouse about Colt's 80-style block and its negative impact on trigger pull. Why doesn't Colt go to the Kimber method, which I understand started with Colt Mfg. in the first place?!

I've been reading some other posts in this particular forum about Colt's supposed demise (I think it's horse pucky BTW), and I would like to own a new one (many people in the "know" have said that the guns coming out of Hartford are GREAT now), but the Series 80 part of it always stops me. Fair concern?
 

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One of the main reasons I won't buy a Colt.
I think Colt should offer a "70 Series" pistol for those who shoot competition or do not desire those parts and Kimber should keep the series I pistols around for those who need a standard 1911. If Colt offered, say, their XS series pistols, in both stainless and blued carbon, without the pin blocks, they could widen their market share greatly. I would, with out a doubt, buy one. Might have bought it over my Kimber. Now it looks as if Springfield will be the best option left for for a "true" 1911. My problem with them is that they make their guns outside the U.S. I also don't like the squarish frontstrap.

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"A flute without any holes isn't really a flute and a donut without a hole is a danish." Ty Webb

[This message has been edited by Denbo (edited 11-26-2001).]
 

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I'm no trigger expert, but I personally don't mind the trigger on my Series 80. It's a bit heavier than the Kimbers I've fired, but just as crisp. If you're really picky about the weight, any decent gunsmith will know how to work with the Series 80 mechanism. I just don't feel like I need any work on mine (of course, I don't shoot bullseye).

I do believe that Kimber has a better idea (not an original idea, but there's nothing wrong with that) as their firing pin safety is disengaged by the grip safety. However, as I hardly notice the difference, the Colt's other features more than outweigh any increase in trigger pull weight.
 

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Guys,

I've shot both a Springfield "loaded" pistol with a 5 lb pull and a Colt 1991A1 Series 80 with about a 5-6 lbs pull. I felt no difference between the two. Maybe it's my fingers, but both felt the same to me. Does the Series 80 trigger become "jerky" when you competition guys want a 2.5-3 lb trigger? As far as personal defense goes, I want my trigger above 4 lbs, so maybe this whole series 70 vs. series 80 thing doesn't apply to someone like me.

themao
 

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Originally posted by McNamara:
I'm no trigger expert, but I personally don't mind the trigger on my Series 80. It's a bit heavier than the Kimbers I've fired, but just as crisp. If you're really picky about the weight, any decent gunsmith will know how to work with the Series 80 mechanism. I just don't feel like I need any work on mine (of course, I don't shoot bullseye).

I do believe that Kimber has a better idea (not an original idea, but there's nothing wrong with that) as their firing pin safety is disengaged by the grip safety. However, as I hardly notice the difference, the Colt's other features more than outweigh any increase in trigger pull weight.
Yeah.....Colt pioneered that style saftey, what in the '40's? Swartze saftey? Then dropped it.
 

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I believe I read that Colt's Milspec 1911A1's are supposed to be 'pre-Series 70' firing pin design. They make them in Colt Commander size as well. Another option?
 

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Whether it is really necessary or not is open to debate, but the Series 80 drop safety is sound, safe, and reliable; furthermore, any gun that can be given a decent trigger pull without the system can be given a decent trigger pull with it.

That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.


Chuck
 

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i haven't dealt with the new kimbers, but to me the colt series 80 is not a problem. it was an improvement meant to make a product safer. whether people like it or not is a risk that a company takes, personally i like it because it doesn't affect the trigger pull enough to keep me from shooting where i want. yeah there are smoother trigger pulls, and if i decide i need it then i will change the pull, but in no way does the series 80 keep me from carrying a colt.

wanna keep me from carying a 1911? put a full length guide rod and extended slide stop and thumb saftey, those i don't need, someone else may like them, but not me.

if your not buying a colt simply because of the series 80, your missing out on a fine weapon. if you choose an other brand because over all its better for YOU, then you did the right thing.

but colt is strong,

i like kimbers, but i spend money on colts, they have what i want, basic weapons.

choose whats right for you, no matter what it says on the side.

russel the cop

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CHANCE FAVORS THE PREPARED MIND....
 

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Discussion Starter #10
My understanding is that all non-Series 80 1911s made by Colt (like the WWII reproduction....is it the only non-S80 they make?) is produced by their Custom Shop to get around the liability issues. You won't be seeing any Series 70s rumbling down the normal production lines.
 

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My two 1911s I own are a Kimber and a Series 80 MKIV. The Kimber is NOT a series II, but the way kimber implements their safety the trigger pull should stay the same. I will tell you my Colt is going for a trigger job now that I've finally found a gunsmith in the St. Louis area that knows his way around a Series 80. It breaks clean but my Kimber has one of the sweetest triggers I've ever felt out of the box, and the Colt is definitely stiff in comparison. That is my only complaint with my 80 gun, otherwise it is still my favorite betwwen the two -- once you catch Colt fever it's hard to look at any other `11 in a fair light.
 
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