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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
If a Colt slide, (slide only,but complete) does NOT have the series 80 firing pin blocking system, yet, is NOT roll-marked "MK IV SERIES 70, does that mean it is a slide from before 1971 ? or.....

Original bright blue, left side roll-marked: Government *MODEL* COLT automatic caliber .45

Rampant Colt follows that.

Right side: COLT'S P.T. F.A. MFG. co. HARTFORD CONN. USA

Thanks. Trying to get up some pictures.
 

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I think it would be before 1970 but yes I think that is what it means. Don't collect those. Have pre 70s Commanders and Gold Cups but no Govs. so can't do a picture, but if you can post one that would be good.
 

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One of my Favorite rollmarks and Colt should have used that one instead of the Series 70 rollmark on the current repop of the Series 70 which is NOT a series 70 in any way , shape or form ...

:rolleyes:
How is the new Series 70 not a Series 70? I'm not being a smarta**. I'm honestly interested in knowing the differences that are significant. I thought the absence of the firing pin block made it a Series 70. Sounds like there's more to it.
 

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Infidel525's eyelids start to twitch whenever he hears someone call a current non-Series 80 1911 a "Series 70", because from 1970-1983 that term exclusively referred to the finger collet barrel bushing and matching Accurizor barrel. Nowdays everyone uses the term to indicate a 1911 without a firing pin safety, and in fact even Colt does so as well. The current Series 70 reproductions are actually "pre-Series 70" guns mechanically, since they have the solid barrel bushing of those older models.

Anyway, here are the typical rollmarks used on pre-Series 70 Colts from ~1957 to 1970:



 

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Discussion Starter #8
Alright guys you settled that question for me, and right quick at it too.
The left and right sides as DSK posted is exactly what I see, including the two tiny "stars" by the word MODEL.
The left side by 1saxman is the same also, except for the lack of the two "stars" by that word.

More interesting info about the slide. While is is NOT a roll marked "MK IV SERIES 70" slide; it does have a barrel with that designation stamped clearly on the barrel hood.

Top line = COLT .45 AUTO, and under that: MK IV SERIES 70. It does not have the collet bushing, but has a well fitted solid bushing.
The barrel also is the "series 70" type barrel, with a .014 larger, final half inch or so....... Regarding that feature, I think the barrel's last half inch is .581, which is pretty standard Colt, and the rest of the barrel behind that is machined down to .567.

Now in my dream world; this beauty of a slide would be mounted on a proper Colt's frame from around 59' or so, (went in the Army in 59'), but as life will have it, it sits atop an ESSEX ARMS CORP ISLAND POND VT. 3774X. Heaven only knows when the frame was built. HELP HERE, APPRECIATED !

While most (all) opinions say the ESSEX is a hit or miss proposition with quality; I find this one to be of the "hit" side of the equation. Very dark blue/black, not parkerized, and the "flats" are of the same level of pre-polish as the rounds, but overall an almost un-detectable match to Colt's frames.

It is not mine, (yet), and will be my decision to buy or pass, after a range session Mon. or Tues.

Thanks for the information.
 

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The barrel would not have come in that slide, but they are good barrels. You're right, the muzzle end is not larger, the main portion is smaller. If you think about it, the muzzle end could not be larger than standard because of fit problems with bushings and slides, but the measurement proves it without any rationalizing.

'The left and right sides as DSK posted is exactly what I see, including the two tiny "stars" by the word MODEL.
The left side by 1saxman is the same also, except for the lack of the two "stars" by that word.'

That is of course impossible, but I think we gather that it is the '60s model.

An Essex-framed pistol with Colt slide/barrel, all good condition and proper function, is probably worth $500 at most as far as I know.
 

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Infidel525's eyelids start to twitch whenever he hears someone call a current non-Series 80 1911 a "Series 70", because from 1970-1983 that term exclusively referred to the finger collet barrel bushing and matching Accurizor barrel. Nowdays everyone uses the term to indicate a 1911 without a firing pin safety, and in fact even Colt does so as well. The current Series 70 reproductions are actually "pre-Series 70" guns mechanically, since they have the solid barrel bushing of those older models.

Anyway, here are the typical rollmarks used on pre-Series 70 Colts from ~1957 to 1970:



B E A U T I F U L pistol !!!

What gets me going even more are the [censored] that call a COMMANDER model a SERIES 70 when there is no such animal.

Someone needs to tell the dumba$$e$ at Colt to stop feeding the ignorance.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
.....Infidel525's eyelids start to twitch
Aw jeez, you mean like "Chief Inspector Dryfus", (Herbert Lom) who was the "twitchy-face" boss of "Inspector Clouseau" in "Pink Panther" ???

I overlook all the "Series 70" Commanders, and all the other incorrect references to "Series 70", but I must say a picture of a "NIB COLT", with the mainspring housing PIN in backwards,(dimple to the right) instead of left gives me "pause".

However, I DO see a need to differentiate somehow, between everyday term usage of "Series 70", (1971 to 1983 or so), and today's "Series 70".

Curious as to how no one ever questions how Colt's came to a MARK IV,( for the Series 70), but hardly anyone knows what the MK I, II, and III, were in the 1911 .45 auto

"Mark" of course, not only with Colt's, means the next "variant" of a product. Army Jeeps, Webley and Browning H P firearms come to mind.
Colt's use though, is difficult to put a "handle" on.

The National Match mid-range .38 special's final configuration was "MK III" but the .357 / .22 revolver "Trooper" is also a MK III ??

Dag, now my eyelid has gone to "twitching".
 
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