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what are some of the reasons that early on I saw a lot of reviews that were kinda against series 80 and 90 models. just want to understand what I can before buying.:confused:
 

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If you are buying a new pistol it is a non issue in my mind.

The Colt Series 80 mechanical firing pin block based off the trigger and introduced by Colt in 1983 is probably used by more other manufacturers than alternatives (Para, Remington, Taurus and others). Kimber uses a variation of the Swartz design that was developed at Colt and used by them before WWII based off the grip safety. S&W used to use and maybe still uses one based off the grip safety and not the trigger like the Series 80. S&W E Series pistols no longer use this.

Look at the bottom of a Glock slide and you will see a little plunger. As I understand it that is a mechanical firing pin block based off the trigger.

All Colt Series 90 pistols use the Series 80 mechanical firing pin block based off the trigger. Series 90 was introduced with the Colt Double Eagle DA pistols. One example below.



Colt continued to call some models Series 90 pistols such as the Colt Defender which is a SA pistol. Still Series 80.

If you read enough threads on enough forums you will find people that prefer the Series 80 system on a carry 1911.
 

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Colt

Likewise.. shoot the Combat Elite I just did a trigger job on. It came with a 7 lb:eek: trigger pull.. now breaks at 2 3/4 lb every pull:)
 

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I have a few Gold Cups: series 70, AND Series 80. I defy you to pull the triggers and tell which is which without looking at the slides. If one knows thier stuff, a great trigger can be set on either. I've shot a few series 70 with mushy sloppy so so triggers too.
 

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You can get a good trigger on an 80 series with work, you can't get a great trigger on an 80 series.
This series 80 has a superb trigger; it was done at the Colt custom shop. Bullseye shooters tend to be very trigger-sensitive. 80's series guns can be tuned as well as any older 1911. Gotta know what you're doing. Most bullseye-tuned series 80 guns that I've tried had NICER triggers due to the slight roll-off the trigger pull had. The initial mushiness of 80's triggers can be worked into an awesome roll-off trigger, which most international and conventional pistol shooters want. Good rapid-fire targets can't be shot with creepy, heavy triggers.
Bob

 

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well I was going to join in but seem you guys got this difference of option straighten out

But as long as I am here my GCNM Series 80 has an awesome 3.5# trigger<G>
 

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You can get a good trigger on an 80 series with work, you can't get a great trigger on an 80 series.

that would be a myth...ive shot 70 series colts the same time next to my gold cup and my 80 was as good as the 70 hands down...mine breaks like glass with no creep...consistently at 3.5-3.6 pounds.... id have to agree with the above post...in a blind test it would be a wash between modified 70 and 80 series colts.....maybe the top 1% of 1% would tell a difference.
 

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I put off buying a Series 80 for years because of all the trash talk. Last spring I broke down and ordered a new Super 38 Series 80 through my gunsmith. I'm sure he saw dollar signs when I did. When the pistol came in, it was so smooth, tight and crisp that he accused me of having it worked over before it was shipped. Long story short, I have a new 45 in Series 80 on the way now.
 
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