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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I recently spoke with Les Baer (The company, not the man) and was informed that they use 24lb. variable recoil springs (Wolff)in their commanche length guns.

I have been having some of those infamous "reverse case stovepipes" with my gun (Concept VII), but a change to a Wolff 22lb recoil spring seems to have solved the problem.

What is the reason behind the 24lb. spring, and why do they use a variable rather than a regular spring, and what do you all consider the best recoil spring setup for a commander/commanche length gun?


Thanks for the help.

SFB.

P.S. What are the advantages/disadvantages of a shock-buff on a coammander length gun?
 

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Bill

I use a 20 lb spring in my Commander and it functions perfectly. I would expect the reason Les Baer is using the 24 lb variable is the tight slide to frame fit they build into the guns, and a variable is to allow the start of the slide action with a lighter sprng force with the stronger force when the spring is compressed. If your pistol is functioning properly with a 22 lb spring I would not worry about it.

Using a Shock-buf reduces the slide travel by the compressed thickness of the buff, usually a little less than 1/8 inch. This may or may not be an issue in the Baer pistol depending on if the pistol uses a bushing, or has a bushingless barrel. The concern is will the slide have enough travel to reliably eject and empthy and pickup the next JHP round in the magazine,this can be a big issue in a slide that uses a reverse plug with a bushingless barrel.

Another thing is the slide stop notch length. If you look at a Kimber slide stop notch it is about twice as long as the original design. In a Kimber, if you use a buff retracting the slide will not depress the slide stop allowing the slide to go forward. In a Kimber, if you use a buff you must depress the slide stop to close the slide. I do not believe Baer does this but it is worth a look.

I hope this helps.
Str8_Shot
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Str8_Shot,

Thanks for the reply. I figured that the Reason for the variable was the force needed to "start" the slide back.

The spring that came with the gun did not feel like a 24lb. spring. In fact, The 20lb was heavier, so I figured it as a standard 18lb. spring. Once every 100 rounds or so, I'd get one of those reverse case stovepipes, but I put this 22lb. spring in it, and after about 250 rounds, it has been perfect. Therefore, I think I'll leave it in.
 

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I ordered some recoil springs for my Stinger. It has a Commanche length upper. The lady who answered the phone said it uses 21 lb variable springs. They have been working fine for me. I have two Commanches, but have not as yet replaced their springs. I assumed they would be the same as the Stinger. Maybe not.

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