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I remember a story from years ago of a LEO who would train disarming a perp. During these drills he would hand the gun back to his training partner. Fast forward to a situation where he actually used his training and disarmed a perp I real life situation, He then automatically handed the gun back to said perp! From my recollection LEO was able to gain control of the gun again.
This was brought up to us during training. The solution was instead of handing it back to your training partner to go again or reverse roles they instructed us to toss the gun (blue plastic) on the mat beside them. I thought that was almost as bad as handing them the gun.
 

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Instinctive or 'point' shooting is a lost gunfight or combat method. Probably/mainly due to lack of safe areas to do it for many. The combat guru gun writers of the 70's (Jordan/Cooper/Askins/Hackathorn/etc) , wrote about it in every magazine back then.
 

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Instinctive or 'point' shooting is a lost gunfight or combat method. Probably/mainly due to lack of safe areas to do it for many. The combat guru gun writers of the 70's (Jordan/Cooper/Askins/Hackathorn/etc) , wrote about it in every magazine back then.
There are a few guys teaching it. Roger Phillips at Fight Focused Concepts does. I took his two day point shooting class a decade ago. It was great and I shot 1,800 rounds when 9mm was $150/case. He described it as a movement class, not necessarily a shooting class. Handgun Course Descriptions
 

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I learned point-shooting at the Gunsite 250 course a long time ago. Would like to take Phillips course, but he is only doing private teaching this year (a mistake). Where is his company located?
 
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Today's BB gun clones of top combat pistols would make for some great point-shooting trainers.
 
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When I was still working I did quite a bit of point shooting practice. Our range had a plate table that was left out all the time. I’d stop out there once a week or so and run a couple mags with just a draw and fire one shot at a plate from ten yards. It was extremely good point shooting practice that was very beneficial. It was also a nice stress reliever during a crappy day at work!
 

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J-snubs can also be fired while still in and THRU the jacket pocket if need be , up close & personal , without jamming. When I carry my M37 in a jacket pocket , usually during the cold months , my hand is usually in my pocket too , and on it.
Thats exactly what I meant. Carried in the jacket pocket, finger on the trigger, ready to rock. Otherwise I have mag fed steel over my butt.
 

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J-snubs can also be fired while still in and THRU the jacket pocket if need be , up close & personal , without jamming. When I carry my M37 in a jacket pocket , usually during the cold months , my hand is usually in my pocket too , and on it.
M38 for me; the same reasoning.
 
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The only question I have about carrying a 1911 is what to do with it at night when I am traveling - leave it cocked and locked, lower the hammer down on a live round, or drop the mag and eject the live round. Most often, I leave it cocked and locked.
Dismounting the holster; pistol stays in the holster: that's my practice, just the same as I do at home.
 

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Yep and those who can only hold a 20" pattern at 10 yards will no doubt start shooting better when fighting for their lives or taking incoming fire. :unsure:
"pattern" ... oh my ...
 
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The only question I have about carrying a 1911 is what to do with it at night when I am traveling - leave it cocked and locked, lower the hammer down on a live round, or drop the mag and eject the live round. Most often, I leave it cocked and locked.
Why would you not leave it in Condition-1? There is no difference between it being on the nightstand and in a holster.
 

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My ready service 1911s stay cocked and locked unless being shot and cleaned or when getting their periodic external clean up of lint and dog/cat hair. I do not advocate dropping a mag and clearing the breech just to put it on the night stand. If you are concerned put it in the holster on the night stand. Eventually, sometimes much sooner than expected, rounds subject to frequent trips in and out of the chamber, will shorten up, potentially causing feeding and pressure problems. Another problem with a pistol sitting, without atleast a magazine inserted, is the tendency to fumble or drop the mag when trying to find it and insert it in the dark under stress.
 

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I've always practiced flipping the thumb safety off as the weapon starts to clear the holster and flipping the thumb safety on when re-holstering until it's become automatic through muscle memory. That combined with speed drawing the weapon makes for not having to think about engaging the thumb safety. Only someone who doesn't practice (or is totally ignorant in the safe handling of a 1911) or is a total idiot would forget to flip off the safety during a real self defense incident.

When I first retired and started going through the LEOSA firearms requalification course, the firearms instructor that I found was a police officer/range instructor. His course of fire was very similar to my federal agency's course of fire. Except, it was strictly Pass/Fail. Course of fire was timed with 50rds at ranges from 1 1/2 ft/ back to 25 yards, with combat reload stages. After a couple of years I was unable to contact him to reschedule another qualification course and I had to try and find a certified instructor through the various shooting ranges in the area. I found one that did the LEOSA certifications and his course of fire was very simple/easy. 50rds but, maximum distance was only 15 yards. I forget the timed fire, but, it was a lot of time and even the combat reloads had plenty of time for me and my 8 rd 1911 magazines to reload and continue firing. Last year was my second year using a civilian range instructor. None of them was as unprofessional/ignorant as your instructor.
 

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The instructor in our firearms training at the prison I and my wife worked at told us all the reason they would not use hollow points was because they would over-penetrate. Most of the class believed him because they had never fired a gun.

The first thing I do when practicing with my 1911 is taking the safety off while drawing it.
 

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I've always practiced flipping the thumb safety off as the weapon starts to clear the holster and flipping the thumb safety on when re-holstering until it's become automatic through muscle memory. That combined with speed drawing the weapon makes for not having to think about engaging the thumb safety. Only someone who doesn't practice (or is totally ignorant in the safe handling of a 1911) or is a total idiot would forget to flip off the safety during a real self defense incident.
And many of us old dinosaurs who've been carrying hammer down on a live round (the way JMB intended!) for over 40yrs , have been practicing cocking the hammer when we draw.
 

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If anyone thinks 1911 is "too dangerous" to anyone except BGs, here is a great read:

Sleeve Bag Luggage and bags Font Personal protective equipment
.
 
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Point shooting, Believe it or not was taught to me in the Achadamy for the Sheriffs Office. In the early 80's with a .357. Won't see that nowadays.
 

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Point shooting, Believe it or not was taught to me in the Achadamy for the Sheriffs Office. In the early 80's with a .357. Won't see that nowadays.
The book I referenced above talks about this. Point shooting was the "in" thing at shorter ranges (<15-yards?) up thru the 1990s. It has since been done away with except at distances of <6-feet. The 3-foot "groin shoot" is point shooting.
 
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