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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, I screwed up on my home-made comp for my .460 Rowland, and I have to make another one. I happened to be speaking to George at EGW earlier today, and it turns out that they offer both cone and bushing comp blanks for $40 each.

Now, I could turn, thread, mill and grind a bushing comp myself at no cost, plus I already have one of their angle-bored bushings, but I could buy their cone comp and save some time on that, at least. As it stands, I've already threaded the half-inch of barrel that's sticking out in front of the bushing (It's .581-40 tpi), so I'm not even sure if I could make this work in a .575-40 comp. Plus, I know that modification of the slide is involved, and I'm not exactly sure what's involved yet.

My question: is there any significant accuracy advantage with cone comps that would justify the expense and trouble involved in going this route?
 

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Okay, I screwed up on my home-made comp for my .460 Rowland, and I have to make another one. I happened to be speaking to George at EGW earlier today, and it turns out that they offer both cone and bushing comp blanks for $40 each.

Now, I could turn, thread, mill and grind a bushing comp myself at no cost, plus I already have one of their angle-bored bushings, but I could buy their cone comp and save some time on that, at least. As it stands, I've already threaded the half-inch of barrel that's sticking out in front of the bushing (It's .581-40 tpi), so I'm not even sure if I could make this work in a .575-40 comp. Plus, I know that modification of the slide is involved, and I'm not exactly sure what's involved yet.

My question: is there any significant accuracy advantage with cone comps that would justify the expense and trouble involved in going this route?
My advice would be to swap that barrel for a threaded barrel and use a real comp with chambers and ports. :) A bushing comp is worth less-than nothing to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If anything, true accuracy is diminshed by a comp. If you are concerned with muzzle flip and recovery, then a muzzle comp is fine.
Well, ultimately I'm using one to reduce slide velocity for the .460 round. At this point, I'm just trying to make up my mind which one to use. Unless a cone thread-on comp is known to give a significant increase in accuracy versus a standard thread-on comp, I'd rather not go through the trouble. I am doing my best to squeeze out accuracy everywhere else, though (gunsmith-fit barrel, rails cut specifically for the slide I'm using, angle-ground minimum-clearance bushing, cylinder & slide fire control group, etc.), so if it would definitely help, I'll do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well, that definitely answers the recoil questions. Too bad they didn't do an accuracy comparison while they had the Ransom Rest.
 

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Well, that definitely answers the recoil questions. Too bad they didn't do an accuracy comparison while they had the Ransom Rest.
Why do you believe there will be a difference in accuracy?

I'm still learning a lot about the 1911 platform and it's accessories but I don't see how a comp would have an effect on accuracy. Well, unless you did a bushing comp maybe and it wasn't properly fit.
 

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Ask a couple of people that use threaded cones on their barrels instead of bushings. They will tell you that they can hold much tighter tolerance on the cone to slide fit than they can with a traditional bushing and barrel setup.
 

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The EGW as you can see from the photos, allows the bullet to exit while trapping some gasses behind it as it moved through the baffles, the Wilson because the barrel has to slide through the bushing cannot trap as much, if any gas behind the bullet. The EGW is heavier which also contributes to recoil reduction through dampening, like a heavy slide.

I did a lot of accuracy testing with comps on .22 olympic pistols years ago and found accuracy diminished as the carbon built up in the chambers, causing uneven pressure as the bullet exited the barrel. The carbon is very hard to remove, and if not kept in check will result in the comps failure (read shoot off) as the exit holes close down. This was common on Model 41's and High Standards years ago. I'm sure it also happens with larger calibers to some degree.
 

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My advice would be to swap that barrel for a threaded barrel and use a real comp with chambers and ports. :) A bushing comp is worth less-than nothing to me.
You're thinking of the wrong kind of bushing comp. There is one design that uses a threaded barrel and traditional compensator, but also includes the use of a traditional bushing. That's the type EGW and Clark sells, and you can see pics here:

http://www.egwguns.com/index.php?p=product&id=1528

http://clarkcustomguns.com/parts-category/1911/

A bushing-replacement comp is the other kind where compensator replaces the bushing and the barrel has to pass through the comp with each shot. That's like the Wilson Multi-Comp, as shown in the pictures BushidoBrown posted.
 

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The EGW as you can see from the photos, allows the bullet to exit while trapping some gasses behind it as it moved through the baffles, the Wilson because the barrel has to slide through the bushing cannot trap as much, if any gas behind the bullet. The EGW is heavier which also contributes to recoil reduction through dampening, like a heavy slide.

I did a lot of accuracy testing with comps on .22 olympic pistols years ago and found accuracy diminished as the carbon built up in the chambers, causing uneven pressure as the bullet exited the barrel. The carbon is very hard to remove, and if not kept in check will result in the comps failure (read shoot off) as the exit holes close down. This was common on Model 41's and High Standards years ago. I'm sure it also happens with larger calibers to some degree.
I haven't seen any reports of comps flying off on the Brian Enos website. Many folks have figured out way to prevent the buildup of carbon and easier ways to clean it out when it does accumulate.

The Wilson MultiComp redirects plenty of gas, as supported by the data in the article that BushidoBrown provided.
 

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The EGW as you can see from the photos, allows the bullet to exit while trapping some gasses behind it as it moved through the baffles, the Wilson because the barrel has to slide through the bushing cannot trap as much, if any gas behind the bullet..
 

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Discussion Starter #14
My advice would be to swap that barrel for a threaded barrel and use a real comp with chambers and ports. :) A bushing comp is worth less-than nothing to me.
It's a threaded comp. What I meant is that it uses a bushing instead of a cone.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Ask a couple of people that use threaded cones on their barrels instead of bushings. They will tell you that they can hold much tighter tolerance on the cone to slide fit than they can with a traditional bushing and barrel setup.
See, that intuitively makes sense, and is why I'm asking. It seems to me that, with a cone comp, you're eliminating one fit variable (the two I'm thinking of: barrel-to-bushing, and bushing-to slide) so that the only fit variable is cone to slide. It seems like this should increase accuracy to some degree, but then again, I know there are things that seem like they would work but, in practice, do little to nothing. That's what I'm wondering; are there real-world significant gains that make it worth the trouble. Like I said, I could crank out another traditional threaded comp in a couple hours or less, whereas the cone would involve buying a blank, then cutting up the slide, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The EGW as you can see from the photos, allows the bullet to exit while trapping some gasses behind it as it moved through the baffles, the Wilson because the barrel has to slide through the bushing cannot trap as much, if any gas behind the bullet. The EGW is heavier which also contributes to recoil reduction through dampening, like a heavy slide.

I did a lot of accuracy testing with comps on .22 olympic pistols years ago and found accuracy diminished as the carbon built up in the chambers, causing uneven pressure as the bullet exited the barrel. The carbon is very hard to remove, and if not kept in check will result in the comps failure (read shoot off) as the exit holes close down. This was common on Model 41's and High Standards years ago. I'm sure it also happens with larger calibers to some degree.
Did you notice an accuracy difference between cone and traditional threaded comps? I have to suffer with an overall accuracy loss regardless, due to it being a .460, but I'll take the lesser of two evils.
 

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FWIW, you may want to research the effectiveness of the comps, such as the chart given in an above post. I used two comped barrels, one a popular setup with two large chambers and the other with three smaller chambers, angled baffles and side ports. There was a definite difference in how effective the comps were. And this was with hot 45 Super class ammo. I can only imagine the difference being much greater with a 460 Rowland.
 

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Nominal 1340 fps iwith a 230 grain jacketed bullet (one source indicated 1241 with 6" barrel)

Nominal 1560 fps with a 185 grain jacketed bullet
 
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