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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I carried my Remington R-1 all week. I carry in condition one. Tonight I got home, unholstered the weapon, cleared the weapon, and the round that ejected from the chamber had some gouges (fairly pronounced) on the projectile. I reinserted the mag, racked the slide, and chambered another round. Again I cleared the weapon, ejected the round from the chamber, and found another couple of gouges on the 2nd projectile. Looked the weapon over and found the ejector was not centered in its chamber. Any ideas here? I am a good shooter but not a great smith. I keep my weapons clean, and so on, but I could use a few suggestions from the armorers among us. THANKS, and all the best.
(SEE PICS BELOW)
 

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Weird, subscribed to see what the experts say.
 

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Bent ejector. Maybe you can get it back to spec. Maybe not. For it to be so badly bent it may be weak or flawed. Best of luck. About how many rounds do you have through it out of curiosity? Thanks for your service. * extractor not ejector. Brain fart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Raggedwhole: I have about 1500 rounds through this weapon. Thanks for your input!
 

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Your extractor is clocking. The top edge is at eleven o'clock and the bottom edge is at five o'clock. It should be at 12 and 6, parallel to the hammer slot. You can probably probably rotate it a little with your fingernail fairly easy. It normally only causes erratic ejection at first. As it continues to loosen you will get failures to feed. I do not think your clocking extractor responsible for the gouged bullet or what looks to be mark in the middle of that case. I would take the barrel out and twist the barrel mouth around the tip of my finger and see if I felt a rough spot. I would look inside the chamber and see if I see a rough spot. Drop a round into the barrel while it is out of the gun and see if there is friction. It should just plunk in and pull out easy. Look at the inside of the slide around the leading edge of the ejection port for copper marks.

The usual fix for a clocking extractor is the fitting of an oversized firing pin stop and/or extractor and stop.

A gi sized ejection port will have some bullet bounce as it was designed for ejection of fired cases instead of loaded rounds. It is hard to tell looking at a two dimensional image of a three dimensional mark on a picture.
 

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+1 on a new oversize firing pin stop. EGW or Wilsons flat bottom firing pin stop.....no radius or a small radius just to break the edge. I don't use a radius but many suggest it.

Side note question: with a rd chambered, when you pull the slide back slowly, does the extractor hold the rd in place after it completely clears the chamber?
 

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If you must do the above side note test at your house instead of the range, please remove the firing pin or use an action proving dummy.
Why? :confused: He's an experienced gun handler and he's not testing the trigger while he's racking the slide. Do you remove the firing pin to chamber/unchamber a round?
 

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He is experienced and he gained most of that experience in the military according to his handle. They have very strict regulations regarding uploading and downloading. I could take a picture of one of the safe cans we have but it is dark. I can recall reading here of at least two nds at home from conducting experiments at home with loaded rounds. One required hospitalization.

Having to do something out of necessity is one thing. Making a choice being risk and safe is another matter. My gun smith has a "can" and action proving dummies.

People with small ejection ports have trapped a live round with primer against ejector and had a discharge. Now the bullet does not really go anywhere because the expanding gas is not confined but folks have gotten real nice burns, just to save the round from getting dinged up when it hit the concrete.

I just saw on another thread you counseled against unloading a carry gun at home to prevent compounding bullet set back by successive re-chambering. Now you advocate live round experiments in the home for the purpose of finding out whether the clocking extractor holds the round or not. What will dropping the round or holding it prove when we know his extractor is rotating? He can check that with the slide off turning it upside down.

If your need for instant gratification in having the OP report back to you outweighs the OPs need to select the safest of two methods, that is selfish and not in the best interest of the OP.
 

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People with small ejection ports have trapped a live round with primer against ejector and had a discharge.


I just saw on another thread you counseled against unloading a carry gun at home to prevent compounding bullet set back by successive re-chambering. Now you advocate live round experiments in the home for the purpose of finding out whether the clocking extractor holds the round or not. What will dropping the round or holding it prove when we know his extractor is rotating? He can check that with the slide off turning it upside down.

If your need for instant gratification in having the OP report back to you outweighs the OPs need to select the safest of two methods, that is selfish and not in the best interest of the OP.

I have always advocated on the side of safety, however from your explanation I can see where they my intention might be misunderstood/misconstrued.

Op has a Remington R1, though I have never personally seen or handled one, the pics on the Remington website clearly show a lowered and flared ejection port....not a problem to be able to eject a live rd.

On the other thread where I counseled against unchambering....the gist of the thread was ABOUT bullet setback and my advice was not too unless you needed to and while keeping your gun loaded to secure it at all times.... and in my case, when the gun is not on my person, it gets locked in a one of several GunVaults.

As far as removing the firing pin, my reasoning for NOT is that even though we can see that the extractor is clocked, whether it is physically loose (which is why I suggested the live rd extraction slowly), and turns easily. What this would prove or disprove 2 things...1- whether the extractor moves on its own and 2- whether the firing pin stop is loosely fitted and not holding the extractor tight. Without the firing pin in place, the stop (possibly) wouldn't stay in place to find out for sure. This was my reasoning for my suggestions. And as far as recommending the unchambering, he states he carried it all week condition 1, not chambered/unchambered every day....his bullet setback issues would not be the same as the other thread you referenced. Hopefully I have explained this appropriately. Tracy
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hey, ALL of you Guys are the best!! I learned alot from each and all of your posts. I found a bent extractor. I worked with it and tweaked it. I also found it to be loose-fitting. So I'm chucking it and have ordered new parts.
Anyway--THANKS AGAIN to you brothers.
I wish you and your families a very merry Christmas!
Sincerely,
Curt
 

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I agree with CurtTheMarine that we can learn from one another. Never had this particular issue but the day ain't over. "The beginning of wisdom is this: Get wisdom." (Proverbs 4:7).

Lots of it here concerning 1911s.
 

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You can check with your fingernail. Slide off or on, no ammo. This first one is not giving much visual feed back yet but flunks the fingernail. Firing pin stop does, too.



This one is tight. There is no rotation with the fingernail.

 

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Here is a GI ejection port. You can see ejection port length remained constant.



Thank you, I appreciate the effort and I stand corrected.



Side note...what gun is the Series 80 model, just curious as to the country of Mexico markings?


Now explain to me how a loaded rd clears the ejection port.....just kidding.
 

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It is a Colt 02991 made for the Sedena. It is actually a super but the COL for super, 45 and 10mm is the same. Super and 10 empty cases are longer though. I found it in a store in a town surrounding the DFW metroplex. Most likely a contract overrun. I say overrun because my gun doctor could find nothing to indicate it was a reject. When I was selling in the early eighties, we received a smith model 10 with a Saudi Arabian crest on the side plate. Normally some extras are made on a run with special markings in the event the inspectors find a reason to take one or more out of what is suitable for shipment. Lots of contract overruns out there with no special markings as part of the contract. If this one had made it to the Sedena, it would have been given this on the slide:

 

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It is a Colt 02991 made for the Sedena. It is actually a super but the COL for super, 45 and 10mm is the same. Super and 10 empty cases are longer though. I found it in a store in a town surrounding the DFW metroplex. Most likely a contract overrun. I say overrun because my gun doctor could find nothing to indicate it was a reject. When I was selling in the early eighties, we received a smith model 10 with a Saudi Arabian crest on the side plate. Normally some extras are made on a run with special markings in the event the inspectors find a reason to take one or more out of what is suitable for shipment. Lots of contract overruns out there with no special markings as part of the contract. If this one had made it to the Sedena, it would have been given this on the slide:

Pretty cool......I'd love to come across something like that in a 1911. Years ago, when I still lived in Md, my buddy who worked in a gunstore called me about some special runs for the Md State Police....they carried Berretta 96's and these were the 96 Centurion (shorter bbl than standard 96's) with MSP markings and serial #'s. I was police then, but not MSP and picked one up at a REALLY good price.....wife was actually the one who bought it and later sold it to another police buddy of ours.
 
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