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Another one of those "do we show our permits" for a routine traffic stop. I don't know for sure if we in Colorado are required to appraise LE that we are armed and have read conflicting accounts. Don't know for sure if LE makes the connection between our Drivers License and a CCW permit, some say yes others say no.....but here's what happened to me. I was Coming down a twisty mountain road at about 11 pm last Friday night. At the end of the curves is the town of Morrison and a speed transition (to 25 mph). There was a Morrison PD car pointed in the other direction. Turns out he had a speed gun and he was on my tail with his lights on in less than 20 seconds. His gun indicated that I was going 40 and I have to admit that I had been watching the twisty road and not my speedometer although I was surprised that I had been going that fast on the downhill. When asked for license and registration I also handed him my CCW as I had my pistol under the seat. He handed it back without a word and proceeded to issue me my citation. My first reaction was that he sympathized with me and decided not to bust my chops by hauling me out of the car and checking my weapon for which I was grateful. The fact that he was where he was indicated that it may have been a pre-arranged speed trap and he proably felt he had better things to do on a Friday night than busting people at the edge of town. At any rate he was courteous and I would like to think that he he respected the fact that I let him know I was armed.
Interested in hearing about othe experiences here in our state and if anybody knows for sure what the protocol is.
Thanks in advance
 

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You might want to check out this website:
http://www.coloradocarry.com/forums/

From what I found at the Colorado Bureau of Investigation, it looks like you only have to produce "upon demand". If he doesn't ask, then it's your option whether you want to tell him or not.

http://cbi.state.co.us/ccw/Statutes/18-12-204.asp

18-12-204. Permit contents - validity - carrying requirements.
(1) (a) Each permit shall bear a color photograph of the permittee and shall display the signature of the sheriff who issues the permit. In addition, the sheriffs of this state shall ensure that all permits issued pursuant to this part 2 contain the same items of information and are the same size and the same color.
(b) A permit is valid for a period of five years after the date of issuance and may be renewed as provided in section 18-12-211. A permit issued pursuant to this part 2, including a temporary emergency permit issued pursuant to section 18-12-209, is effective in all areas of the state, except as otherwise provided in section 18-12-214.
(2) (a) A permittee, in compliance with the terms of a permit, may carry a concealed handgun as allowed by state law. The permittee shall carry the permit, together with valid photo identification, at all times during which the permittee is in actual possession of a concealed handgun and shall produce both documents upon demand by a law enforcement officer. Failure to produce a permit upon demand by a law enforcement officer raises a rebuttable presumption that the person does not have a permit. Failure to carry and produce a permit and valid photo identification upon demand as required in this subsection (2) is a class 1 petty offense. A charge of failure to carry and produce a permit and valid photo identification upon demand pursuant to this subsection (2) shall be dismissed by the court if, at or before the permittee's scheduled court appearance, the permittee exhibits to the court a valid permit and valid photo identification, both of which were issued to the permittee prior to the date on which the permittee was charged with failure to carry and produce a permit and valid photo identification upon demand.
(b) The provisions of paragraph (a) of this subsection (2) apply to temporary emergency permits issued pursuant to section 18-12-209.
(3) (a) A person who may lawfully possess a handgun may carry a handgun under the following circumstances without obtaining a permit and the handgun shall not be considered concealed:
(I) The handgun is in the possession of a person who is in a private automobile or in some other private means of conveyance and who carries the handgun for a legal use, including self-defense; or
(II) The handgun is in the possession of a person who is legally engaged in hunting activities within the state.
(b) The provisions of this subsection (3) shall not be construed to authorize the carrying of a handgun in violation of the provisions of section 18-12-105 or 18-12-105.5.
Source: L. 2003: Entire part added, p. 639, § 1, effective May 17.
 

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Don't know exactly what the law requires for Oklahoma Concealed Carry permit, but out of respect to any LEO, I always tell them when I have a concealed weapon on me or in my vehicle if I'm pulled over driving.
It's really just a respectful thing that I do, it's what I would expect if I was a LEO and was pulling people over.
If I don't have a weapon on me, I don't bring up the subject of my concealed carry permit.
 

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In Missouri the LEO's don't ask, and we don't tell, unless asked. They know as soon as they run the POV plate number. Which according to procedure, as I understand, is before they get out of their patrol car.
 

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I've always produced my carry permit and my license at the same time every time I've been pulled over, as a courtesy to the officer and I've never not had one thank me for doing so.
 

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In the class I took, we were told that your CCW permit is tied to your DL. The only time that you would inform the LEO is if you are asked to get out of your car. The guy that taught the class was retired FBI.

I live in Colorado.
 

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Fortunately, I have not been pulled over since I've had my CCW, but if I do get pulled over while carrying, I willl tell the LEO, as a courtesy, as I'd want to know if I were a LEO and I too live in Colorado.

Just sayin........
 

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I'm glad I live in Oregon. You don't have to tell the police here. Not that they have anything to fear from me. I would help any of them if I saw they need it.

Stan
 

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I'm glad I live in Oregon. You don't have to tell the police here. Not that they have anything to fear from me. I would help any of them if I saw they need it.

Stan
Yes, in Oregon there is no requirement to advise or present your CHL permit. The information is tied to a driver's license check. It appears many people are taught at the CHL class to advise and present the card because it has been my experience about 90% do, even if they are not carrying at the time.
 

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unless they ask you about a firearm etc. being in the car. there's no need to inform them. In colorado you don't need a permit to carry concealed in your car.
 

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my understanding is also to produce "on demand". however, i do know that while the permit may be tied to your drivers license, that does not mean that an officer will have access to that information.
i was involved in an accident on south wadsworth approaching chatfield (a careless driver who was stopped in his lane tried to jump lanes and hit me). the responding officer was a state trooper (and one of the nicest and most professional leo's i have yet to meet, by the way). i was at work (in a company owned vehicle) and do not carry at work, and just did not think of handing him my permit. after all was said and done he pulled me aside and apologized for the whole ordeal taking so long and said the reason was "your id set off all kinds of alarms and it took us a while to track it down to your permit. in the future, if you inform me that you are a permit holder things will go quicker" i apologized and told him that in this situation i just did not think of it and promised i would in the future. perhaps local leo's have easier access to it, maybe some do, some dont? either way i tend towards letting them know about the permit should i have more encounters with the law.
 

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In Texas we are required to tell even though they know it when they run our driver's license or vehicle tags. They just removed the penalty for not telling them.
 

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I'm amazed at the number of people that post on this forum that have no clue about the CCW laws and such for their own state. If you are reading this, then you have access to the internet and can check the laws for all 50 states.
 

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While most people may know the laws of their state, they may not know gun-related items of importance to them that have nothing to do with the law. Colorado is one such state where this absolutely affects you as a CCW holder. Many sheriffs in Colorado enter CCW holders into the Colorado Bureau of Investigation CCIC database as a "Person of Interest". This means when your license is ran you pop up as a Person of Interest. Other persons of interest include sex offenders, gang members, criminal suspects, etc...

Now this is not universal in all Colorado counties so you may or may not be entered. The following link is to the RMGO site where they listed all the counties whose sheriffs were entering CCWers into the CCIC database. This list is from 2007 and may have changed somewhat.

http://www.rmgo.org/ccwguide/CCIC.shtml

Again, this has nothing to do with Colorado law. The sheriffs take it upon themselves to do it.
 

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Now this is not universal in all Colorado counties so you may or may not be entered...
Again, this has nothing to do with Colorado law. The sheriffs take it upon themselves to do it.

Well that certainly explains why their is some confusion among Colorado gun owners. I suspect that the local Sheriffs that label ccw permit holders as "persons of interest" probably hold a different view of the 2nd amendment than I do.
 

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I do it if the situation calls for it i.e.: he gets out of his patrol car faster than I can get my wallet out of my back pocket, he asks me to step out for some reason, or if I have to reach over to the glove box while he is there. Over in CT we don't have to tell but some do it as a courtesy, but I have read a lot where it creates a huge problem with the officer and he blows it out of proportion. Calls for extra units, pulls his weapon on the driver, hand cuffs him, throws him in back of his car , gives them the third degree, asks to search the vehicle or just searches with out permission, removes EVERY round out of the revolver, magazines, speed loaders and tosses them back into the vehicle or hands them back separate from the clip.
I have had them extract every round out of my magazines and hand them back to me separate. Gun first then magazines then hand fulls of ammo. Talk about breaking balls
 

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Well that certainly explains why their is some confusion among Colorado gun owners. I suspect that the local Sheriffs that label ccw permit holders as "persons of interest" probably hold a different view of the 2nd amendment than I do.

That’s what happens when you get political amateurs instead of professionals.

:(
 

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While most people may know the laws of their state, they may not know gun-related items of importance to them that have nothing to do with the law. Colorado is one such state where this absolutely affects you as a CCW holder. Many sheriffs in Colorado enter CCW holders into the Colorado Bureau of Investigation CCIC database as a "Person of Interest". This means when your license is ran you pop up as a Person of Interest. Other persons of interest include sex offenders, gang members, criminal suspects, etc...

Now this is not universal in all Colorado counties so you may or may not be entered. The following link is to the RMGO site where they listed all the counties whose sheriffs were entering CCWers into the CCIC database. This list is from 2007 and may have changed somewhat.

http://www.rmgo.org/ccwguide/CCIC.shtml

Again, this has nothing to do with Colorado law. The sheriffs take it upon themselves to do it.
Yep, my county does and the one time I was stopped the first thing out of the officer's mouth was "are you carrying tonight" I was and told him where the two CCW's were located. Otherwise the stop went well, he was very polite and professional, as was I, and I'm pretty sure the verbal warning that was issued was a result of the CCW. I was doing 50 or so in a 35 "speed trap" and I acknowledged it, it was right around midnight just after two officers were shot about 5 miles north in a different town.

In my work and life I occasionally interact with those in law enforcement and I usually inform them I have a CCW so we don't have any unpleasant surprises. So far so good.

I think it's probably best to inform as a courtesy and out of respect for their job. There no doubt will be the unpleasant stops like the guy in CT. but not much we can do about it except grin and bear it...there is always a "bad apple" even in LE.

On the other hand I don't want any unpleasant surprises, delays or issues because I've been unwittingly categorized as a "Person of interest". I'll give my Sheriff the benefit of the doubt and assume he did this for a good reason, obviously not all Colorado Sheriff's agree.

Beware the speed trap in Morrison, that guy is as certain to be sitting at the bottom of that Canyon as the sunrise. This is true of many small towns out west, count on it and drive accordingly.
 
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