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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got started reloading and have made a few batches of 45acp now. Dang this is fun stuff, but I have a few questions now that I've gotten started.

1- the local reloading supply store guy warned me not to over crimp the 45acp, how do I know if I'm over crimping?

2- During all my reading and research I read/heard a few times that 9mm Luger is a hard caliber to reload, why is this? 9mm is the other caliber I shoot most often so I'm thinking of getting dies for it too.

3-I have a couple reject cartridges, primed, charged, and bullet over seated. I know I'm not supposed to shoot them b/c of over pressure, but how do I dispose of them?
 

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1 - Pull a bullet out of a finished round and see how much deformity you have from the case mouth being crimped into the bullet. You're going to get some, but you don't want so much that you are say, cutting through the plating if you are loading plated bullets. I try to shoot for a crimp measurment of .471", while others seem to prefer .468" or even less.

2 - Not sure I've read/heard that myself. I don't find reloading 9mm any more or less difficult than reloading .40 or .45.

3 - Spend $25 to buy a bullet puller to take the "reject" rounds apart so you can re-use "all" of the components, or just use a pair of pliers to separate the bullet from the brass and re-use everything but the bullet. If you're just talking a handful of rejects, you might only lose 50 cents or a dollars worth of bullets. If you've got hundreds, you will need to weigh how bad you want to save "all" of the components.
 

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1. Like Kevin said.

2. IME, 9mm is not any harder to load than any other common caliber.

3. Depending on how deeply the bullet is seated and how "hot" your load is, you could just shoot them. The 45acp is a low pressure round and with a large diameter case, shortening the OAL a little bit won't be as catastrophic as with 9mm (for example), assuming you're not at the upper end of the loading scale. If you want to pull them, buy a kinetic bullet puller as Kevin suggested. It's perfectly safe to dis-assemble comleted rounds in that manner, and you get to reuse the components.
 

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I just got started reloading and have made a few batches of 45acp now. Dang this is fun stuff, but I have a few questions now that I've gotten started.

1- the local reloading supply store guy warned me not to over crimp the 45acp, how do I know if I'm over crimping?
You can measure the case mouth, depending on your gun anything below .468 may be to much crimp. It really depends on your chamber most use the .469 to .471 crimp the 45ACP requires very litte crimp.
2- During all my reading and research I read/heard a few times that 9mm Luger is a hard caliber to reload, why is this? 9mm is the other caliber I shoot most often so I'm thinking of getting dies for it too.
The 9MM are not hard to load for but due to the case size you need to be aware of certain issues. This may be what your gun store guy may have been referring to.
The 9MM operates at 33,000 C.U.P. or 35,000 P.S.I.
This is considered a high-pressure pistol case, but the case capacity is rather small.
The problem you can run into is usually loading with fast powders (Red Dot, Clays, and Bullseye) that can create over pressure situations that you may not be able to “catch" in time as you are working up loads.
The cartridge is much more forgiving using slower midrange pistol powders (Power Pistol, Blue Dot, and AA No.7)
These slower powders will generate lower pressure and as you work them up indicate over pressure in a more controlled manor generally giving you “signs” before failure.
Due to the low case capacity you also want to be aware of seating bullets to deeply this can raise pressures in the small case.
If you understand the limitations of the case 9MM is fine to load for.


3-I have a couple reject cartridges, primed, charged, and bullet over seated. I know I'm not supposed to shoot them b/c of over pressure, but how do I dispose of them?
What is the OAL of your short 45 ACP loads? You may be able to shoot them
Are the shorter than 1.190? what powder are they loaded with?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My 2 rejects measure 1.208" and 1.117", cast and blast SWC seated in a case with 3.5gr of bullseye.

What are signs of over pressure?

I'm currently only loading light loads for practice. If I do start loading 9mm, I'd like to use bullseye just to keep things simple (only using ne kind of powder for both calibers I'd be loading), but since its a fast powder is bullseye a bad choice for 9mm?
 

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In my opinion, allowing the round to enter and exit the chamber smoothly and completely is the true measure of whether or not you've got enough crimp.

Obviously you need to take whatever bell out of the case that was created for seating the bullet, but the rounds HAVE to be able to freely drop into the chamber, and my criteria is for them to fall back out when the gun is tipped back with the slide open. You can actually hear the round hitting home (little "clink") if the rounds are tight enough to clear the chamber.

I just don't crimp any farther than needed to remove the bell at the case mouth, and still seat/fall freely from the chamber.

IIRC, the ony overcrimping pictures I've ever seen for the .45, are when the case mouth is pushed so far into the bullet that there is no longer a case mouth lip to stop on the step in the chamber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Definitely shoot those; look at your reloading manual - many AOLs are in the 1.185 range and 3.5grains of bullseye is a puff load
I've tried to take one appart with a pliers, but have only grabbed the skinny part of the swc bullet...is that still ok to fire?
 

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I've tried to take one appart with a pliers, but have only grabbed the skinny part of the swc bullet...is that still ok to fire?
You mean you scratched up the nose of the SWC? You said these were just cast lead SWCs, right? I don't see why it would matter. So long as the case is not damaged and is crimped to the shoulder of the bullet you should be fine to fire.

If your case mouth is extended beyond the shoulder of the bullet and you feed this round, there may not be enough crimp and there's a chance that the tip of the bullet may hang up on the ramp or the top of the chamber and get pushed in too deep.

I have shoved bullets deep into the case before (by not lining up the round with the crimp die). I don't have a bullet puller so in my case I soaked these in WD40 overnight and trashed them.
 

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I've tried to take one appart with a pliers, but have only grabbed the skinny part of the swc bullet...is that still ok to fire?
I've read that the base of the bullet has more to do with accuracy than the nose. Gouges on the nose - not too big a problem. Gouges on the base - big problem (not for firing the bullet, but for accuracy).
 
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