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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just getting started and considering carry options for when I get there. I am right handed but heavily left eye dominant (I shoot using a Weaver stance and sight with my left eye). I'm thinking a cross draw holster would work best with this scenario. Any comments or suggestions?
 

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I would suggest doing a search on this forum with the words "cross draw". This has been discussed many times before. You will probably have more luck looking at the old posts then getting people to post on a common subject again.
Good luck.



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"Even the most normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag and begin slitting throats"
Mencken
 

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Dear rayomefor45,

I agree with double ought that crossdraw should be avoided if at all possible. I do have a suggestion however which may help your aiming using a strong side holster.

Have you tried just canting the gun slightly to the left? This will bring the sights into line with your dominant left eye with a normal right handed/eye stance. I can't remember where I read it but it works well when shooting with the weak hand which is basically what you are doing. Stay safe, Gary

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What I want most from the government is to be left alone. GWT
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Gary,

I've heard that before, but it doesn't seem to make a difference on the range. After reading opinions on cross draw; though, I started practicing lining up from a strong side draw and it wasn't bad at all. I have found that when I do shoot weak hand (I usually don't) I do about the same as right handed. Should I concentrate on shooting left handed? I have heard that recommended before, but most of my practice has been right handed.
 

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I am confused. How does eye dominance correlate with type/location of holster? For that matter, how does that correlate with shooting positions?

While many people like cross-draw holsters, especially since it looks cool when you draw your gun, there are probelms.

1. You gun is already facing the wrong way before you start your draw, and the gun is going to have to be brought to level and pivoted 180 degrees to target.
2. Cross draw is slower for that reason since the gun and muzzle must travel further to be pointed at the target, assuming you are not trying to shoot someone behind you.
3. Cross draw is optimal for the person you are fighting in CQB as they can reach in, grab the gun and retract it only slightly before they can shoot you with it. It would be very hard to draw your gun and get it rotated in such a situation.

On a positive note, cross draw can be great for a car holster if you are the driver, but in that circumstance, there is little or no chance for a scuffle to develop over the gun if you are belted in your car.
 

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Dear rayomefor45, Maybe you should learn to draw and shoot left handed. It definitely won't hurt you to become proficient with both hands. Though I'm all thumbs doing most things left handed, using the canting method I mentioned in my previous post I became quite adept shooting a pistol with my left hand. Even so far as being able to easily cocking the hammer on a single action revolver. I do however shoot one handed and not having my dominant right hand involved may have made it easier for me. You'll never really know until you try. All you have to lose is a little time. Stay safe, Gary

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What I want most from the government is to be left alone. GWT
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Double naught - eye dominance is important in my case because I can't aim with my right eye. When I try shooting with one hand, I actually do better with my left hand because it is easier to align the sights with my left eye. This is not a problem with a Weaver stance because your body is turned slightly. With a triangle (or whatever the correct term is) stance, the tendency is to sight with the eye on the same side as the dominant hand.

Gary,
fortunately, I'm not all thumbs left handed as I am semi ambidextrous. That is why I wondered if it might be better to practice lefty for a while. As you said, all I can lose is time, and I enjoy shooting anyway.

Finally,
With training and practice, it is possible to cross draw safely by rotating the gun under rather than around (to avoid sweeping the area to your left); and speed of draw is debatable. Still, the other points brought up certainly make sense. The last thing I want is to lose my gun in a struggle and get shot with my own weapon.
 
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