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Discussion Starter #1
Here's my situation,,,,

Currently, I'm using a Lee single stage press with RCBS carbide dies. I've loaded a couple thousand rounds on this press for my .45 but I've got one particular brand of bullet that I'm crushing probably 10 to 15% of the cases I'm trying to reload. All other styles and brands work just dandy. And there is nothing special about the brand in question, they are .451 diameter FMJ ball.

Regardless of how I adjust my case neck expanding die, I continually have this problem with this brand of bullet. I can load an identical style bullet from another manufacturer and never have a problem and not make a single adjustment to the dies.

I'm just about ready to chuck the rest of them, and never buy that brand again.

Thoughts??? I'm I overlooking something?

Thanks,
Byron
 

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Are you seating and crimping in one operation? If so, this could be contributing to the problem.

Try seating in one operation and then crimping as a separate operation. I suspect the problem will then disappear.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I am seating a crimping in one operation.

The cases are a hodge-podge depending on the batches I'm loading. I typically, have a ton of Winchester Whitebox, WinClean, S&B, Speer, UMC,,,,etc. It seems to do it with this one particular brand of FMJ's, so I think I'm just not going to get that brand anymore,,,,,
 

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It sounds like you have the same situation as I do. I have a load of 45 cases from different manufacturers that I have reloaded so many times, some of the head stamps are wearing off so much that I can't read them.

When I get to the powder charging/bullet seating/crimping stage (I'm an old RCBS man), I set the seating die according to a dummy round I have in the die box, then turn the die down about 1/4 to 3/8 turns. Sometimes I turn it down a full 1/2 turn. Then I start loading.

When I encounter a round that has seated the bullet (cast 200 g. SWC, or whatever) and gives me a lot of resistance on the lever for crimping, I don't push it. I press a little bit more, then stop. I'll get a crimp for the cast bullets, and in the case (pun intended) of a FMJ round, just enough to remove the bell, that is enough to do the job. If I can't push the lever (RCBS Rock Chucker Combo, circa 1977) to it's full upward thrust to the stop, so what? I've still seated the bullet to the proper depth, crimped the cast bullet, or removed the bell on a FMJ bullet, and that's what it's all about, isn't it?

The reason for all this is case length. Some cases come out of the sizing process a little longer than others. Overall, they all come out about the same, but over time and many resizings, you see a difference.

I admit that it will take a little time and some components to develop the "calibrated arm" necessary to successfully use this "by feel" approach, and I will concede to all of you "this is exceedingly dangerous" naysayers that my method does require some common sense, a little creative thought, and a focused attention to what is going on at the time the reloading process is going on, free of distraction from things like kids, radios, Jerry Springer, Ohpera (or however the *bleep* you spell it), the 6:00 o'clock news, the wife, dog, neighbors, boss, UFOs or anything else that could distract you from turning out a good round each and every time.

I've been doing this for the last 20 years; shot 200 rounds loaded this way today. Not a squib, not a misfire, not a FTF. Just reliable, dependible ammo. Now, if I was just up to the ammo....
 
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