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hi fellas, i have a couple of questions for you if you would be so kind as to answer.i currently have two handguns,a p99 in .40 and a springfield loaded 45 acp(obviously).anyway i manage to shoot 200 to 300 rounds per month,but would like to shoot more.only problem is it hits the wallet a little hard.the gist of my question is how much money do you actually save handloading,or is more of just a hobby of experimentation with different loads?if there is money to be saved,i only have 200 to 300 dollars to spend on a reloading outfit,and i see that the lee reloaders are the closest to my price range.i have aslo looked at hornady,a little pricey,but would keep the money in the state where i live.any help would be appreciated.

Panzer
 

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I shoot about what you shoot a month every week. Without reloading I would go broke or have to shoot less. My current recipe for .45 ACP costs me $3.10 a box of 50. That is figured down to the amount of powder in each round so it's about as accurate a number as I can get. WinUSA (whitebox) goes for anywhere from $11.99 to $14.99 a box around here. As you can see reloading saves me quite a few dollars a box.

I do recommend you buy a good reloading press. I know a few people who bought cheap progressive presses only to buy another, quality, press later. If you plan to keep reloading, you'll recoup the cost of a good press in no time. If you decide it isn't for you, you will be able to get some money back out of a good press. Me, I like the Dillon 550b for beginners and veterans.
 

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the Law of Demand: "All other things constant, a decrease in price will lead to an increase in quantity demanded."

No one has ever shot the same amount of ammo and just paid less for it by reloading, you always end up shooting more.

You'll hear a lot of recommendations to "just get a Dillon". BELIEVE IT! I went through three presses (2 red, 1 green) before taking the plunge and going blue. Yes, they cost a lot. They should, they're worth it.
 

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My cost per box of reloads is less than $2.50. Cheapest local ammo (CCI Blazer) runs about $7.00 per box more than that.
Range ammo is even higher.
So to shoot the same quantity of ammo, I spend less.
Do I spend less overall? I'm convinced that I do.
Of course it helps that I like to reload.
Dave
 

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After the initial "hit" for all the equipment, you won't believe how fast you recoup that cost or how much cheaper it'll be to shoot. That's only one aspect though - reloading is also alot of fun and relaxing, plus you can use any combo of bullets, powder, brass and primers to make your own special rounds for plinking or competition or whatever.

I went out and bought a Dillon 550B and all the accessories from Brian Enos - I recommend the same set-up for you. Good luck!
 

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panzer:

I think that you could keep your guns going at the rate of 200 - 300 per month easily with a single stage press. I have an RCBS rockchucker and have been using it for almost 30 years. You can probably handle up to 150 - 200 rounds per week on one. I break it down to about an hour a night to keep my guns going bang. You should realistically judge how man rounds you are going to shoot before deciding on a progressive.

Advantages of a single stage press:

1) Easier to use
2) Easier to adjust
3) When you make a boo-boo you will have fewer rounds to fix.
4) Easier to spot mistakes.
5) Sometimes slow is good, especially reloading. If you are going to shoot in a league you will probably need a progressive for practice and shooting ammo.
6) Some progressives will not load all calibers, you have to look at this when you are buying your first. With a single stage you can buy dies for almost any caliber, and wildcats.
7) More flexible, you are not bound by the number of stations on the unit. Since there is only one, you just deal with it, not wish for one more slot. You can add steps between steps (ie decap,clean, deprime).
8) Usually cheaper, you can buy a good single stage for the price of a moderate progressive.

No matter what you buy, buy the best you can afford. You will be able to pass it along to your grandchildren as long as it is a quality press.

When people state costs for reloads, many times they ignore the cost of cases. The way semi auto's spit cases you will be losing more cases than you realize, and they are not free (around 1.5 cents per case ). As monster said before you will probably shoot more and maybe not save as much as you think.
 

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I wholeheartedly agree with MoNsTeR and Valkman; save up for a while & buy your last press at the first purchase.

If you're well disciplined, you'll save money by reloading - but the rest of us just can't stay away from "messing around", trying new loads, etc. Reloading is almost a hobby in itself.

My stuff is 95% Dillon; I don't remember what I paid for it some years ago, but I'm well satisfied, and not looking to upgrade my equipment.

Hope this helps...
 

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The advice you've been given about Dillon is absolutely correct. If you think they cost too much, shop around for a used one. Dillon will stand behind their no BS warranty even on used stuff.

If you buy components in bulk (at least by the 1000) you will save at least 50% over the cheepest factory ammo anywhere.
 
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