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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had the opportunity this weekend to try a waved MSH.

My first reaction out of the package was that this thing is very well crafted. The lines are cut flawlessly. It is a very solid, nice looking piece.

Before I even put it on my gun, I pushed the MSH into my palm with the same approximate pressure that I would grip it with, if it were installed on the gun. I then tried to rotate the housing. It did not move. The traction in incredible. I then installed it and tried the same test, this time by twisting the gun. The MSH held firm and did not slip or rotate in my hand.

The first 50 rds. I fired were simply to determine in there were any readily apparent negatives to the feel of the waved housing. I didn't find any - it felt very comfortable. I was using my Combat Commander which has always been very "torquey" in my hand. It likes to try to twist itself out of my grip when rapid firing with the potent loads I like.

The next 250 rds. were more formal. I shot hammers, double taps and squeeze-the-trigger-as-fast-as-you-can-and-empty-the-mag drills. The gun did not slip or twist at all. While I did not time any splits, my seat-of-the-pants feel was that the intervals were marginally quicker. The gun seemed to settle back on target quicker in rapid fire, as there was none of the usual counter-clockwise twist that I became used to and compensated for previously.

I still prefer checkering on the frontstrap, but I would imagine that a gun with waves front and back would be incredible, as the difference with just the MSH is very apparent.

I had always preferred a vertically serrated MSH, (my Commander has the factory serrated MSH) as it allowed my hand to slide up the back of the gun and into the grip safety very easily and quickly when presenting from holster. I was concerned that the wave would make this more difficult and slower - it did not. The waves still allow you to slide your hand quickly into a good shooting grip, but once your hand tightens, the gun becomes one with your palm.

My only real dilemma was how good the waves would look cosmetically with the hard, crisp lines of the 1911 platform. It did take me a while to adjust to the curves every time I looked down and saw them staring up at me. The more I looked at them, the more they seemed at home on the gun however. Now I don't think they look out of place at all.

An interesting note is that the waved MSH is available for left and right hand shooters. The difference being in the way the waves are oriented on the housing. They flow in the opposite direction if you are a lefty.

I highly recommend this little gem.



(Photo courtesy of Dane Burns) http://www.burnscustom.com/




[This message has been edited by shane45-1911 (edited 10-28-2001).]
 
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That is pretty neat looking.

I tell ya, you hard core 1911 guys are about as bad as those low rider guys with all the designs and stuff.
I know..I know... It's not a gang, it's a club.....

But really though, 1911's sure dress up nice don't they.
 

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To me it's ugly. But whatever floats your boat.
 

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Originally posted by ArmySon:
I cannot fathom why they are any different than serration cuts.
Son, I couldn't either - you must try one to know what I am talking about. There is a difference!
 

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Out of curiosity. Does the grip safety even work on that gun?
 

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Originally posted by Mayonaise:
Out of curiosity. Does the grip safety even work on that gun?

Hey Mayo

I'm guessing it's probably pinned down.

Ross T.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Originally posted by Mayonaise:
Out of curiosity. Does the grip safety even work on that gun?
Dane likes to pin his grip safeties. The picture is of one of his guns - I like a functional grip safety on mine.

Anyway, focus on the MSH!!!! Jeez.......
 

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shane, so has the grip twisting in your hand been an issue for you previously? I feel the torque when I shoot, but I haven't had any problems with the gun torquing loose with straight cut msh's or checkered. In reading your description, I am just trying to figure out if you whether or not you have solved a problem I don't have and didn't even know was a problem.

Personally, I think the wave looks alright, but for the most part, I could not care less about looks versus function. If it works better than standard grooved or checkered housing, great!

Clint Smith talked about various forms of friction modification to front straps, back straps, etc. of guns. It was pointed out that the cool rubberband grip covers added to Glocks work great so long as one's hands were dry, free from moisture like blood, but that once introduced, the blood acted like a lube on the silicone rubber surface and it would get squirrely to hold. I have to wonder if the smooth curves that work well when dry might not work well when wet. Without significant changes in groove direction, there isn't much cross strength that you might get better from a similar pattern using straight lines with right angle corners to form a jagged pattern, or of course is formed with checkering.

I didn't follow the last comment about left and right handed. How does the flow affect grip if you are left handed versus right handed? Does not not work well or as well one way? If not, then why would you add an item to your gun that would be detrimental to your off-hand shooting? My off hand shooting isn't as good as it needs to be now, so I would hate to make it harder for me if I had to shoot off-hand. I am asking because I don't understand the benefits of the wave pattern.
 

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Shane, were you at the Dallas Range Master show? I also had the opportunity to handle this gun, or one exactly like it, when I trained with Dane in Dallas. And I have to be frank with you, when I saw the pics that Dane had posted previously, it really didn't do much for me. Either esthetically or my perception of improved gun control. But I must say that now that I've seen it in person and handled the piece, I realize that the photos don't do Dane's work justice, really. It seemed to have a nice, tacky feel to it--and I'm used to handling the LB TRS, which has great controlability. It also looks much nicer in person than it does in the pics. You just can't appreciate the superior work Dane does until you really see one in person. I don't own any of his pieces, don't get into Kimbers anymore, but his work is very impressive.

To tell you the truth, if I were in the market to add a gun to my collection ("another one?", as my wife moans), I'd invest in one of Dane's full-house customs with the wave, it's a matter of how you're building the diversity of your gun collection. There's not a whole lot of functional difference in the wave grip but it's worth the investment due to the quality of the work, the esthetic difference in it and just plain mixing up your collection. How many of the same things can you own? It was a fun piece to shoot in Dallas, very nicely done.....

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"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." --Thomas Jefferson to Charles Yancey, 1816.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Guys, check Dane's website - but I believe the price is $75.00 (or $40.00 if you supply the flat - not arched - MSH).

DNS - check this thread at Pistolsmith.

http://www.pistolsmith.com/viewtopic.php?topic=4395&forum=4&2

Peter explains the left hand vs. right hand thing. I never had a problem with torque to the point where my grasp of the pistol was compromised, but when my hand was sweaty, there was definitely more movement than I would have liked. This MSH cured that slight twist.

Paladin, no I missed Dallas. Maybe for the better!


The gun you handled may very well have been the gun in the photo that I "borrowed".
 
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