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travis, sounds like you did alot of work to solve a simple problem. unlike rifle round, where the expander ball doesn't really open up the case mouth. on pistol dies, the expander ball expands the case mouth to hold the bullet. if your shaving lead of your bullets, your belling die needs to be adjusted. screw the expander down a couple turns at a time, until you've expanded the case enough to hold the bullet and you can see a very small gap between the case mouth and the bullet. you should not have to deburr new pistol brass. also if the lock ring on your dies don't have a set screw, get the one from RCBS. with those once you have your dies set, tighten the set screw, and you won't lose your adjustment when you change dies.
 

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Hi,

i was just wondering what the go is when reloading new brass. As some of you's may know, i have brought everything to reload 600rnd's in .40cal,

So the other night i decided i would try and get ahead start on my reloading before the pistol is ready as im loading for the time being with a single stage press.

I set everything up generally as per i have always down when i reload my rifles, and everything seemed good. (The press is a RCBS rockchucker, and the dies are the new dillon 3pce. set) So i sized the first 20 (cos i wonted to make up just a few and then have them checked b4 i go off making them all up to find out ive done something wrong.) So these all seemed to size well and i seated all the primers with no problems, weighed out all the powder and changed dies to the projectile seeting die, and seated my first one. This was met to be the great moment in my pistol loading life
but there was a fair amount of lead "shavings" around the top of the case, where the case "shaved" out a ring around the projectile as it was seated.

So i figured that maybe the new brass needed deburring? So i deburred each of the 20 cases just a little as i would with my rifle brass, and finished loading these rounds. Perfect.... or maybe not? I had one live round that i was given by one of the guys who shoots the a very simular pistol to the one im having made, to compair off, and measure the overall length. (This round was not one made from fresh new brass, so i dont know how many times it had been loaded etc...)

Anyways one of the things that some of the guys have told me was b4 any big match, they always sit down in front of the telly, and remove the barrel from there pistols and drop in each bullet that they had loaded for the comp. and any that doesnt drop right in, they dont take to the match. So the bullet that he gave me to measure off, i used to compair the width of the case's once they were fully loaded.

My 20 rounds measured just a tiny bit thinner then his one. So i presume that they should be ok?

These rounds that im loading up, are only going to be used to run'in the pistol. (When my gunsmith has finished building the pistol, b4 any of the fine cosmetic etc. work is done, he will be giving me the pistol to stick around 500 rnds through it, then i give it back and it will be taken apart again, all the finer details done, "finished/ nickled" then checked/fired again then it should be ready for me to take home)

So i say this because i wont be using these first lot of reloads for comps or anything, so im just making them generic rounds copied from the guy using the a simular pistol.

Does anyone see any problems with my going on and deburring all the new brass?

I spoke to one of my shooting friends, who also uses a very simular built STI to what im having made, and he was saying that i should not have to deburr the new cases, and that the .40 is very 'touchie' round to make and when being used in pistol with match barrels with a very tight chamber as these do, everything must be perfectly setup correct for it to work/cycle and not to get the lead shavings comming off the projectile. So he said that my dies must not be setup correctly. Which i believe he would be right, but the problem is, as im using the single stage press, and it isnt really possible for me to test the dies. As i cannot make a tiny adjustment to the first die, and then try seating the projectile next and then pull it, to check for markings, as i have to remove the first die to put in the second die to seat it, which means i loose the settings of the first die.

So with all this in mind, i have pritty much decided that i have to buy my new press (a progressive one) asap, and i will hold off in getting my holsters etc... but... for now, the 20rnds that i made, deburring them... should they be ok to use?

Another thing my friend was saying was, with the new brass, he said the first time i use it, i will get lots of crap/ bits of brass etc. through the barrel with each shot. Can anyone explain this to me in a bit more detail.

many thanks for any help
Travis.
 

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Concur. I check my brass for burrs with my fingers. I lightly place my finger and thumb on the case mouth, and rotate the case with my other hand. If I feel a rough spot, I lightly deburr it. An alternative I sometimes use is just my thumb or finger alone, but the idea is the same...to feel for a burr. No rough spot, no burr. It also reveals small splits in the case mouth that are hard to see with the eye alone.
 

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I agree that it's a simple matter of just expanding the case mouth more.

New cases need to be deburred and chamfered, especially when using lead bullets. I get wild and deburr the flash hole, but this is a carry-over from rifle loading.

I don't know about the bits off brass from new cases. I've never seen cases that had bits of brass anywhere that would fly off.

Remember that 50% of the people you meet will give you bad reloading advice. Treat this information like anything you may hear in a gun store(highly suspect). We have a guy at our local matches who claims to be the authority on all aspects of reloading. Funny thing is that he has the most ammo related failures of anyone I've ever seen.

Instead of screwing around dropping rounds into your barrel, use the Lee factory crimp die and have no further worries.

Variations in dies mean that all ammo will not measure the same.

[This message has been edited by Walking Point (edited 10-28-2001).]
 

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Hello everyone and thanks a lot for the reply's.

Though.... there was a little something that i see slipped my mind and the same as yours


The dillon dies, do not have a "belling" / case mouth expansion die in there 3 die set. There dies are setup i can only presume to be used with there presses which have the 4 die, which is used to feed the powder into each case, and it is this 4th die that comes with the "conversion" set (to suit your caliber) when you buy the press, and then you can by more as your need them if you wont to load different calibers ... (at least, thats the way its all sold here.)

So i have decided to bite the bullet, and have brought the 550 press. Which i will be picking up on wednesday !!


Once again, thanks for all the help

Travis
 

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Discussion Starter #6
travis,
on the dillon die sets, the powder drop die is the 4th die that should come with the press. the die body is generic for all calibers, but the converson kits comes with a powder through, expansion insert that is caliber specific. it's this setup that is the belling die on the dillon's. i'd suggest that you buy a powder die for every caliber you reload. there cheap,and it a major pain to adjust everytime you switch calibers.
 
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